35

So we have a page:

<span id='container'>
    <a href='#' id='first'>First Link</a>
    <a href='#' id='second'>Second Link</a>
</span>

And want to add some click events:

first.addEventListener('click', function(){alert('sup!');})

Works like a charm! However, when you make the second argument an external function:

function message_me(m_text){
    alert(m_text)
}

second.addEventListener('click', message_me('shazam'))

It calls the function immediately. How can I stop this? So annoying!

Here's a live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ey7pB/1/

4
  • 5
    Since the second parameter expects a function reference, you need to provide one. With your problematic code, you're immediately calling the function and passing its result (which is undefined). Either call the function in an anonymous function (like your first example) or alter the function to return a function (probably not ideal).
    – Ian
    Apr 30 '13 at 23:17
  • 2
    Why is this not ideal? It seems against D.R.Y. to copypasta my function in the 4 or so addEventListeners that im setting, no? Apr 30 '13 at 23:20
  • Another option is to store the required message as an attribute on the element, then bind the function as second.addEventListener('click', message_me) and have it retrieve the message from the attribute rather than from a parameter.
    – nnnnnn
    Apr 30 '13 at 23:23
  • 1
37

Quoting Ian's answer:

Since the second parameter expects a function reference, you need to provide one. With your problematic code, you're immediately calling the function and passing its result (which is undefined...because all the function does is alert and doesn't return anything). Either call the function in an anonymous function (like your first example) or alter the function to return a function.

function message_me(m_text){
    alert(m_text)
} 

second.addEventListener('click', 
    function() {
        message_me('shazam');
    }
);

Here's an updated fiddle.

2
  • I think you should update your accepted answer because passing the function without calling it, and bind - is probably a better choice here. Nov 2 '16 at 14:53
  • 4
    Can you explain why you think bind is a better choice?
    – clav
    Nov 2 '16 at 16:07
23

Since the second parameter expects a function reference, you need to provide one. With your problematic code, you're immediately calling the function and passing its result (which is undefined...because all the function does is alert and doesn't return anything). Either call the function in an anonymous function (like your first example) or alter the function to return a function.

You can do this:

function message_me(m_text){
    alert(m_text);
}

second.addEventListener('click', function () {
    message_me('shazam')
});

or this:

function message_me(m_text){
    return function () {
        alert(m_text);
    };
}

second.addEventListener('click', message_me('shazam'));

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/tcCvw/

15

or you can use .bind

function message_me(m_text){
    alert(m_text);
}

second.addEventListener('click', message_me.bind(this, 'shazam'));

check MDN Documentation about 'closures'

2
  • 1
    +1 binding should be the way to go — not sure if that was available 4 years ago, but is definitely the preferred way to today, as opposed to creating an anonymous function
    – vol7ron
    Mar 7 '17 at 0:40
  • 1
    Nice suggestion for the bind, definitely should be the accepted answer. Can OP change? May 31 '18 at 10:50
11

Modern ES6 solution using arrow functions

second.addEventListener('click', () => message_me('shazam'))

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