9

I have a class, PlayerInputComponent:

.h:

class PlayerInputComponent
{
public:
    PlayerInputComponent(PlayerMoveComponent& parentMoveComponent_, std::unique_ptr<IRawInputConverter> inputConverter_);
    PlayerInputComponent(PlayerInputComponent&& moveFrom);
    void update();

private:
    std::unique_ptr<IRawInputConverter> inputConverter;
    PlayerMoveComponent& parentMoveComponent;
};
}

.cpp:

PlayerInputComponent::PlayerInputComponent(PlayerMoveComponent& parentMoveComponent_, std::unique_ptr<IRawInputConverter> inputConverter_) :
    parentMoveComponent(parentMoveComponent_),
    inputConverter(std::move(inputConverter_))
{
}

PlayerInputComponent::PlayerInputComponent(PlayerInputComponent&& moveFrom) :
    parentMoveComponent(moveFrom.parentMoveComponent),
    inputConverter(moveFrom.inputConverter.release())
{
}

and a class, PlayerMoveComponent, that contains a PlayerInputComponent member and initializes it using a std::unique_ptr passed as a parameter. Its constructor:

PlayerMoveComponent::PlayerMoveComponent(/* other parameters */ std::unique_ptr<IRawInputConverter> inputConverter) :
    //other initializations
    inputComponent(PlayerInputComponent(*this, std::move(inputConverter)))
{
}

I defined my own move constructor for the PlayerInputComponent class since my understanding is that a default move constructor won't be constructed for a class which contains a reference member. In this case though I know that the reference will remain in scope for duration of the PlayerInputComponent object's lifetime.

Since I'm initializing the PlayerMoveComponent's inputComponent variable from a temporary, I believe one of the following two things is supposed to happen:

  1. PlayerInputComponent's move constructor is used to initialize the playerInputComponent member variable.
  2. The move is elided by the compiler.

However, Visual Studio 2012 spits this out:

error C2248: 'std::unique_ptr<_Ty>::unique_ptr' : cannot access private member declared in class 'std::unique_ptr<_Ty>'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              _Ty=SDLGame::IRawInputConverter
1>          ]
1>          c:\program files\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\memory(1447) : see declaration of 'std::unique_ptr<_Ty>::unique_ptr'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              _Ty=SDLGame::IRawInputConverter
1>          ]
1>          This diagnostic occurred in the compiler generated function 'PlayerInputComponent::PlayerInputComponent(const PlayerInputComponent &)'

Why is the copy constructor being called here? Making the PlayerInputComponent class's parentMoveComponent member a regular ParentMoveComponent instance, rather than a reference, gets rid of the error, but I don't understand why - I've tested and verified that move constructing objects with reference members works so long as you provide your own move constructor, so what's the deal?

  • @MooingDuck: I don't see how that answers the question. I'm pretty sure this is a bug in MSVC. – Jesse Good May 1 '13 at 0:03
  • 1
    @JesseGood: oh you're right, I misread part of the code. Then it's This bug report of mine :P – Mooing Duck May 1 '13 at 0:15
  • The declarations of the aforementioned classes, stripped down to only include reproducible results (which doesn't appear to be too difficult) would be nice to see as well, specifically PlayerMoveComponent – WhozCraig May 1 '13 at 0:25
  • 3
    @yngum: Assuming inputComponent is a PlayerInputComponent, then you told it to construct a PlayerInputComponent from the parameters, and then move construct inputComponent from that temporary. Presumably you meant inputComponent(*this, std::move(inputConverter)) instead. – Mooing Duck May 1 '13 at 0:34
  • 1
    @JonathanWakely, yes, it can move from the rvalue, but without knowing what type inputComponent actually is, I can't know that the rvalue can be used to initialize it without a copy being invoked. In particular, if inputComponent is of a class that contains a copyable-but-not-movable member, it will also (by default) be copyable-but-not-movable, meaning the move constructor will actually be a copy constructor. Similar side-effects can crop up depending on what constructors inputComponent's type provides. That's why I think we need to know its type, and I don't see it in the OP. – Adam H. Peterson May 1 '13 at 22:50
1

I'm sorry in advance if this doesn't really answer your question, I just want to react on the apparent complexity of your problem. If I may, wouldn't this be a thousand times simpler:

/********************     **********     ********************/

class C {};
class B;



class A
{
public:

    A(): _b(nullptr), _c(nullptr) {}
    A( B *b, C *c ): _b(b), _c(c) {}
    A( A&& a ): _b(a._b), _c(a._c) {}

private:

    C *_c;
    B *_b;
};



class B
{
public:

    B( /* other parameters */ C *c ): _a( A(this,c) ) {}

private:

    A _a;
};


    /********************     **********     ********************/


int main()
{
    C c;
    B b(&c);
}

and yet achieve the same thing? I have nothing against using the new features in c++11, like std::unique_ptr, but IMHO, ensuring that a pointer can never be dereferenced from two places should not be a matter of run-time checking (except maybe in very rare cases), but a matter of design.. shouldn't it?

  • I really agree with you, but I think the main reason to not use raw pointers is to have some security over who is using it. For instance in your code, I could pass a c pointer to your B class, and after this call delete on it! (BOOM ... it will crash sometime later). Using the unique_ptr as stated, would prevent this because the control would be passed to the new B instance and nobody outside of it could delete it. – Julio Raffaine May 7 '13 at 21:34
  • Ahn ... and by the way, I don't know if unique_ptr do any kind of check when dereferencing ... if you create a brand new one (nullptr) and try to access it, it will crash like any pointer. It's useful when you want to ensure who is the owner and it must be ONE owner (unique). – Julio Raffaine May 7 '13 at 21:38
  • @JulioRaffaine Thanks a lot for these comments! :) What I meant about dereferencing was this; the only reason you would want a unique_ptr is because you don't want anyone else to access it. AFA the deletion is concerned, funily enough, I think it should actually be simpler if you intended to use unique_ptr and that you eventually don't: the only class that contained the unique c-pointers here was A, so logically A should delete the memory allocated for c in its destructor, and "nullify" it instead when it is simply being copied. – Sheljohn May 7 '13 at 21:53
1

If you initialize a new Object using =, the copy constructor will be triggered by default. To trigger the move constructor, you need to alter the behavior of operator= You can find an example here Hope I helped you.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.