74

How come date is converting to wrong time?

result=$(ls /path/to/file/File.*)
#/path/to/file/File.1361234760790

currentIndexTime=${result##*.}
echo "$currentIndexTime"
#1361234760790

date -d@"$currentIndexTime"
#Tue 24 Oct 45105 10:53:10 PM GMT
6
  • 2
    1361234760790 / (60*60*24*365) = 43164.47 years
    – perreal
    May 1, 2013 at 2:03
  • not sure what that explains?
    – bobbyrne01
    May 1, 2013 at 2:07
  • 2
    Roughly 43164 + 1970 ~= 45105 (43135.8 + 1970 to be more accurate) so the date is right
    – perreal
    May 1, 2013 at 2:09
  • interesting, how can this date be printed correctly?
    – bobbyrne01
    May 1, 2013 at 2:12
  • using epochconverter.com, i get GMT: Tue, 19 Feb 2013 00:46:00 GMT which is desired result
    – bobbyrne01
    May 1, 2013 at 2:21

3 Answers 3

136

This particular timestamp is in milliseconds since the epoch, not the standard seconds since the epoch. Divide by 1000:

$ date -d @1361234760.790
Mon Feb 18 17:46:00 MST 2013
1
  • 2
    Yes, its due to timestamp in milliseconds. I have also checked here epochconvert.com and get correct result Tuesday, 19 February 2013, 12:46:00 AM GMT
    – Laeeq
    Feb 19, 2017 at 13:42
27

For Mac OS X, it's date -r <timestamp_in_seconds_with_no_fractions>

$ date -r 1553024528
Tue Mar 19 12:42:08 PDT 2019

or

$ date -r `expr 1553024527882 / 1000`
Tue Mar 19 12:42:07 PDT 2019

or

$ date -r $((1553024527882/1000))
Tue Mar 19 12:42:07 PDT 2019
19

You can use bash arithmetic expansion to perform the division:

date -d @$((value/1000))

Note that "value" is a bash variable with the $ being optional; i.e., $value or value can be used.

0

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