64

I have the following div element:

.description {
  color: #b4afaf;
  font-size: 10px;
  font-weight: normal;
}
<div class="description">Some text here</div>

Then I have a click function on an element to hide the above div:

$('#target').click(function(){
  $(".description").hide();
});

When I hide the div, it collapses and stops taking up space. This messes up the layout of my page.

Is there a way to hide the div, but still maintain the space it was taking before? I don't want to change the font color because it would be still selectable.

124

Use visibility css property for this

visibility:

The visibility property specifies whether the boxes generated by an element are rendered.

$(".description").css('visibility', 'hidden');

Demo: Fiddle

9

And another option for the sake of completeness. Toggle opacity:

$(".description").css('opacity', 0); // hide
$(".description").css('opacity', 1); // show

http://jsfiddle.net/KPqwt/

However using visibility is prefered for this task.

7

Try:

$(".description").css("visibility", "hidden")

hide() is the equivalent to: $(".description").css("display", "none");

Which does not reserve the space the element was taking.

Hidden makes the element invisible, but stills reserves the space.

2

It's important to note that dfsq's example using Opacity:0 will still allow the contents to be selected, copy/pasted, etc., although there is no visible text-highlighting when selecting.

1

you can wrap another div around the outside of it, and probably tell it a specific height to occupy. that way your inner div can show and hide and fadeOut, etc, and the outer div will hold down the real-estate on the page.

  • You could. But under what circumstances would you want to do this, when the accepted answer (from a year ago!) is simpler (no extra div needed), and does not require hard-coding a specific height? Even if you wanted a specific height, you wouldn't do this, you would just put the height in css on the already existing element. I don't mean to be rude, and I appreciate that it is good to have alternative solutions. I am just baffled by the suggestion of what appears to be an always-inferior solution, a year after the question was resolved? Am I missing something? – ToolmakerSteve Aug 11 '14 at 18:38

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