150

I want to capture the browser window/tab close event. I have tried the following with jQuery:

jQuery(window).bind(
    "beforeunload", 
    function() { 
        return confirm("Do you really want to close?") 
    }
)

But it works on form submission as well, which is not what I want. I want an event that triggers only when the user closes the window.

17 Answers 17

212

The beforeunload event fires whenever the user leaves your page for any reason.

For example, it will be fired if the user submits a form, clicks a link, closes the window (or tab), or goes to a new page using the address bar, search box, or a bookmark.

You could exclude form submissions and hyperlinks (except from other frames) with the following code:

var inFormOrLink;
$('a').on('click', function() { inFormOrLink = true; });
$('form').on('submit', function() { inFormOrLink = true; });

$(window).on("beforeunload", function() { 
    return inFormOrLink ? "Do you really want to close?" : null; 
})

For jQuery versions older than 1.7, try this:

var inFormOrLink;
$('a').live('click', function() { inFormOrLink = true; });
$('form').bind('submit', function() { inFormOrLink = true; });

$(window).bind("beforeunload", function() { 
    return inFormOrLink ? "Do you really want to close?" : null; 
})

The live method doesn't work with the submit event, so if you add a new form, you'll need to bind the handler to it as well.

Note that if a different event handler cancels the submit or navigation, you will lose the confirmation prompt if the window is actually closed later. You could fix that by recording the time in the submit and click events, and checking if the beforeunload happens more than a couple of seconds later.

| improve this answer | |
  • 8
    yup, working great! The newer versions of jquery support $('form').live('submit, function() { }). – Venkat D. Aug 27 '11 at 4:44
  • 4
    Your solution is good but how do I cancel the event in case of refresh ? I want the event only if the browser is closed, no case of refresh – Refael Oct 22 '13 at 8:57
  • It seems that the browser displays the return value of beforeunload as a confirm dialog. So I think this answer is more accurate: link – tahagh Aug 4 '14 at 2:37
  • 2
    does this handle refresh of a page using Ctrl + r, F5, Ctrl + Shift + r and changing the browser URL? – Arti Aug 13 '15 at 5:01
  • 1
    @Jonny: It's now just .on(). – SLaks Dec 26 '17 at 18:14
45

Maybe just unbind the beforeunload event handler within the form's submit event handler:

jQuery('form').submit(function() {
    jQuery(window).unbind("beforeunload");
    ...
});
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Isn't this just as easy not using jQuery by specifying this in the form tag definition? : `<form onsubmit="window.onbeforeunload=null;"> – awe Apr 12 '11 at 8:15
  • 4
    @awe But you'd need to include that onsubmit=... in each form. (I have many forms per page, in a certain webapp) – KajMagnus Sep 17 '11 at 15:28
16

For a cross-browser solution (tested in Chrome 21, IE9, FF15), consider using the following code, which is a slightly tweaked version of Slaks' code:

var inFormOrLink;
$('a').live('click', function() { inFormOrLink = true; });
$('form').bind('submit', function() { inFormOrLink = true; });

$(window).bind('beforeunload', function(eventObject) {
    var returnValue = undefined;
    if (! inFormOrLink) {
        returnValue = "Do you really want to close?";
    }
    eventObject.returnValue = returnValue;
    return returnValue;
}); 

Note that since Firefox 4, the message "Do you really want to close?" is not displayed. FF just displays a generic message. See note in https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/window.onbeforeunload

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This one works consistently across browsers. Just a quick note; I updated both the live and the bind statements to on, which works great with the latest level of jQuery. Thanks! – Sablefoste Jan 31 '13 at 22:15
16
window.onbeforeunload = function () {
    return "Do you really want to close?";
};
| improve this answer | |
4

For a solution that worked well with third party controls like Telerik (ex.: RadComboBox) and DevExpress that use the Anchor tags for various reasons, consider using the following code, which is a slightly tweaked version of desm's code with a better selector for self targeting anchor tags:

var inFormOrLink;
$('a[href]:not([target]), a[href][target=_self]').live('click', function() { inFormOrLink = true; });
$('form').bind('submit', function() { inFormOrLink = true; });

$(window).bind('beforeunload', function(eventObject) {
    var returnValue = undefined;
    if (! inFormOrLink) {
        returnValue = "Do you really want to close?";
    }
    eventObject.returnValue = returnValue;
    return returnValue;
});
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This answer is correct but for those who have had issues with this event happening when you refresh the browser change your if to the following code: if (inFormOrLink !== undefined && !inFormOrLink) – LeonPierre May 5 '15 at 17:38
4

My answer is aimed at providing simple benchmarks.

HOW TO

See @SLaks answer.

$(window).on("beforeunload", function() { 
    return inFormOrLink ? "Do you really want to close?" : null; 
})

How long does the browser take to finally shut your page down?

Whenever an user closes the page (x button or CTRL + W), the browser executes the given beforeunload code, but not indefinitely. The only exception is the confirmation box (return 'Do you really want to close?) which will wait until for the user's response.

Chrome: 2 seconds.
Firefox: ∞ (or double click, or force on close)
Edge: ∞ (or double click)
Explorer 11: 0 seconds.
Safari: TODO

What we used to test this out:

  • A Node.js Express server with requests log
  • The following short HTML file

What it does is to send as many requests as it can before the browser shut downs its page (synchronously).

<html>
<body>
    <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script>
    function request() {
        return $.ajax({
            type: "GET",
            url: "http://localhost:3030/" + Date.now(),
            async: true
        }).responseText;
    }
    window.onbeforeunload = () => {
        while (true) {
            request();
        }
        return null;
    }
    </script>
</body>
</html>

Chrome output:

GET /1480451321041 404 0.389 ms - 32  
GET /1480451321052 404 0.219 ms - 32  
...  
GET /hello/1480451322998 404 0.328 ms - 32

1957ms ≈ 2 seconds // we assume it's 2 seconds since requests can take few milliseconds to be sent.
| improve this answer | |
3

I used Slaks answer but that wasn't working as is, since the onbeforeunload returnValue is parsed as a string and then displayed in the confirmations box of the browser. So the value true was displayed, like "true".

Just using return worked. Here is my code

var preventUnloadPrompt;
var messageBeforeUnload = "my message here - Are you sure you want to leave this page?";
//var redirectAfterPrompt = "http://www.google.co.in";
$('a').live('click', function() { preventUnloadPrompt = true; });
$('form').live('submit', function() { preventUnloadPrompt = true; });
$(window).bind("beforeunload", function(e) { 
    var rval;
    if(preventUnloadPrompt) {
        return;
    } else {
        //location.replace(redirectAfterPrompt);
        return messageBeforeUnload;
    }
    return rval;
})
| improve this answer | |
1

Perhaps you could handle OnSubmit and set a flag that you later check in your OnBeforeUnload handler.

| improve this answer | |
1
jQuery(window).bind(
                    "beforeunload",
                      function (e) {
                          var activeElementTagName = e.target.activeElement.tagName;
                          if (activeElementTagName != "A" && activeElementTagName != "INPUT") {
                              return "Do you really want to close?";
                          }
                      })
| improve this answer | |
1

Unfortunately, whether it is a reload, new page redirect, or browser close the event will be triggered. An alternative is catch the id triggering the event and if it is form dont trigger any function and if it is not the id of the form then do what you want to do when the page closes. I am not sure if that is also possible directly and is tedious.

You can do some small things before the customer closes the tab. javascript detect browser close tab/close browser but if your list of actions are big and the tab closes before it is finished you are helpless. You can try it but with my experience donot depend on it.

window.addEventListener("beforeunload", function (e) {
  var confirmationMessage = "\o/";
  /* Do you small action code here */
  (e || window.event).returnValue = confirmationMessage; //Gecko + IE
  return confirmationMessage;                            //Webkit, Safari, Chrome
});

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Reference/Events/beforeunload?redirectlocale=en-US&redirectslug=DOM/Mozilla_event_reference/beforeunload

| improve this answer | |
0

If your form submission takes them to another page (as I assume it does, hence the triggering of beforeunload), you could try to change your form submission to an ajax call. This way, they won't leave your page when they submit the form and you can use your beforeunload binding code as you wish.

| improve this answer | |
0

My Issue: The 'onbeforeunload' event would only be triggered if there were odd number of submits(clicks). I had a combination of solutions from similar threads in SO to have my solution work. well my code will speak.

<!--The definition of event and initializing the trigger flag--->


$(document).ready(function() {
updatefgallowPrompt(true);
window.onbeforeunload = WarnUser;   
}

function WarnUser() {
var allowPrompt = getfgallowPrompt();
    if(allowPrompt) {
    saveIndexedDataAlert();
    return null;
    } else {
        updatefgallowPrompt(true);
        event.stopPropagation
    }
}

<!--The method responsible for deciding weather the unload event is triggered from submit or not--->
function saveIndexedDataAlert() {
    var allowPrompt = getfgallowPrompt();
    var lenIndexedDocs = parseInt($('#sortable3 > li').size()) + parseInt($('#sortable3 > ul').size());

    if(allowPrompt && $.trim(lenIndexedDocs) > 0) {
        event.returnValue = "Your message";
    } else {
        event.returnValue = "   ";
        updatefgallowPrompt(true);
    }
}

<!---Function responsible to reset the trigger flag---->
$(document).click(function(event) {  
$('a').live('click', function() { updatefgallowPrompt(false); });
 });

<!--getter and setter for the flag---->
function updatefgallowPrompt (allowPrompt){ //exit msg dfds
    $('body').data('allowPrompt', allowPrompt); 
}   

function getfgallowPrompt(){        
    return $('body').data('allowPrompt');   
}
| improve this answer | |
0

As of jQuery 1.7, the .live() method is deprecated. Use .on() to attach event handlers. Users of older versions of jQuery should use .delegate() in preference to .live()

$(window).bind("beforeunload", function() {
    return true || confirm("Do you really want to close?"); 
}); 

on complete or link

$(window).unbind();
| improve this answer | |
0

Try this also

window.onbeforeunload = function ()
{       
    if (pasteEditorChange) {
        var btn = confirm('Do You Want to Save the Changess?');
           if(btn === true ){
               SavetoEdit();//your function call
           }
           else{
                windowClose();//your function call
           }
    }  else { 
        windowClose();//your function call
    }
};
| improve this answer | |
-1

Just verify...

function wopen_close(){
  var w = window.open($url, '_blank', 'width=600, height=400, scrollbars=no, status=no, resizable=no, screenx=0, screeny=0');
  w.onunload = function(){
    if (window.closed) {
       alert("window closed");
    }else{ 
       alert("just refreshed");
    }
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • It doesn't work. At the moment the unload event fires (btw, it fires from document), the window.closed === false; – Sergey P. aka azure Nov 4 '16 at 11:58
-1
var validNavigation = false;
            jQuery(document).ready(function () {

                wireUpEvents();
            });

            function endSession() {
                // Browser or broswer tab is closed
                // Do sth here ...
                alert("bye");
            }

            function wireUpEvents() {
                /*
                * For a list of events that triggers onbeforeunload on IE
                * check http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms536907(VS.85).aspx
                */
                window.onbeforeunload = function () {
                    debugger
                    if (!validNavigation) {
                        endSession();
                    }
                }

                // Attach the event keypress to exclude the F5 refresh
                $(document).bind('keypress', function (e) {
                    debugger
                    if (e.keyCode == 116) {
                        validNavigation = true;
                    }
                });

                // Attach the event click for all links in the page
                $("a").bind("click", function () {
                    debugger
                    validNavigation = true;
                });

                // Attach the event submit for all forms in the page
                $("form").bind("submit", function () {
                    debugger
                    validNavigation = true;
                });

                // Attach the event click for all inputs in the page
                $("input[type=submit]").bind("click", function () {
                    debugger
                    validNavigation = true;
                });

            }`enter code here`
| improve this answer | |
-7

Following worked for me;

 $(window).unload(function(event) {
    if(event.clientY < 0) {
        //do whatever you want when closing the window..
    }
 });
| improve this answer | |
  • it is a jquery function. – maxisam Jan 9 '12 at 20:37
  • 7
    The event.clientY is negative if you click on the browser close button or tab close button. However, this value is positive when you reload the page using keyboard shortcuts (F5, Ctrl-R) or close the browser using keyboard shortcurts (e.g. Alt-F4). Thus, you cannot rely the event position to differenciate browser close event from page reload event. – Julien Kronegg Dec 17 '12 at 14:33

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