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The code I've inherited is too nested to try and paraphrase here. Basically I have a class method defined that makes a copy of a complex graph structure (e.g. graph=NetworkX_graph.copy()) and returns it as part of a named tuple.

The returned named tuple is compared against a max value, and if it's higher, it's kept. e.g.

if value > max_value:
    best_value = {"index": index, "value": value, "graph": graph}

How do I release the memory allocated for my copied object?!? I've tried everything I can think of. I'm currently using memory_profiler and attaching the @profile decorator to the method that include the .copy(). That copy in the test case I'm working with increments by 7.8MB, (could be higher or lower depending on the case) and is never released. It just keeps climbing until the application itself exceed the available system memory and it starts swapping to disk. (ugly...)

I've tried setting the no longer required tuple to None, the 'del' it, then gc.collect(), and gc.collect(2). The memory usage keeps growing.

BTW, I'm stuck with Python 2.6, I could force a move to 2.7.

Could it be because I'm using tuples?

  • 1
    Something else somewhere else is probably holding a reference to it. – yiding May 2 '13 at 2:38
  • Thanks for the quck reply. The increase according to memory_profiler occurs when I perform the NetworkX_graph.copy(), which makes sense. There's a lot that's been implemented that works with that copy. (the methods in question are part of the copied object. e.g. self.process_something()) Any idea how I could determine (in the PDB or otherwise) what's referencing an object? – garlicman May 2 '13 at 2:45
  • Perhaps gc.get_referrers – yiding May 2 '13 at 2:52
  • Hmmm... sys.getrefcount(on_my_tuple) nets me 4 references. sys.getrefcount(on_my_tuple["copied_graph"]) nets me 3 references. Using gc.get_referrers(on_my_tuple) returns quite a long output. (that NetworkX graph was taking up 7.8MB after all) How do, or can I, tell which references are the ones keeping gc from collecting the object? I'm kind of at a loss here, and I know this is not easy to help without an example, so any advice is appreciated! – garlicman May 2 '13 at 4:38
  • The garbage collector will reclaim anything that is not eventually referenced by some "root" object, with root objects being things like globals. I would try removing references (guided by the list that you got from get_referrers) until the object goes away, perhaps someone else has a better solution. – yiding May 2 '13 at 17:33
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Ok, I solved it. It required a little refactoring. When I was passing in a object reference (as a parameter to a method/function call) any changes to that reference would result in new memory being allocated. The memory wouldn't be released/gc.collect() until after the reference was out of scope. e.g. the code pointer returned to the function/method that passed the reference in question in the first place, and that function/method exited.

The following is the most time I can spend trying to illustrate the problem:

_compute(self, graph):
    maxValue = 5
    values = {}
    keeper = {}
    values ["graph"] = graph.copy()
    for i in range(1,1000):
        self._process(values )
        if values ["value"] > maxValue:
            keeper = {"graph":values ["graph"], "value":values ["value"]}

_process(self, values):
    graph = values["graph"]
    # Do some graph processing, like make a copy, allocate some memory, add some vertex values, etc... 
    values["value"] = <some value, like 0 to 10>
    values["graph"] = graph

Any changes to the "values" object passed into _process as a reference will result in the Python runtime holding old and new versions of the changed data. It won't get released until you'r back in _compute and it's exited.

My fix was to modify the _process method to actually return the graph object. Once I was returning objects instead of modifying passed in references, the garbage collection was back to release the allocated memory properly.

_compute(self, graph):
    maxValue = 5
    values = {}
    keeper = {}
    values ["graph"] = graph.copy()
    for i in range(1,1000):
        newGraph = self._process(values )
        if values ["value"] > maxValue:
            keeper = {"graph":newGraph, "value":values ["value"]}

_process(self, values):
    graph = values["graph"]
    # Do some graph processing, like make a copy, allocate some memory, add some vertex values, etc... 
    values["value"] = <some value, like 0 to 10>
    return graph

I'm not saying my answer is the best or that I even have a clue what's going on as I'm not a Python expert, but hopefully this helps someone looking for clues on memory consumption like I was.

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