220

Currently, I have this code:

@-webkit-keyframes blinker {
  from { opacity: 1.0; }
  to { opacity: 0.0; }
}

.waitingForConnection {
  -webkit-animation-name: blinker;
  -webkit-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
  -webkit-animation-timing-function: cubic-bezier(.5, 0, 1, 1);
  -webkit-animation-duration: 1.7s;
}

It blinks, but it only blinks in "one direction". I mean, it only fades out, and then it appears back with opacity: 1.0, then again fades out, appears again, and so on... I would like it to fade out, and then "raise" from this fade back again to opacity: 1.0. Is that possible?

  • 1
    If you take a look on the right of this page, there is a column entitled Related with many 'related' topics. Take a look at some of those .. you'll be able to study all that you need. – Milche Patern May 2 '13 at 17:43
  • 2
    You can take a quick course about css transitions on bradshaw : css3.bradshawenterprises.com – Milche Patern May 2 '13 at 17:45
  • 61
    No offense, if he wants to blink his text, he wants to blink his text. It doesn't matter what year it is. The most innovative people in the world are those who don't live by rules. Quite the opposite, they usually break them and next, everyone copies them. I guess Apple is a great example. So is Mackie etc etc. I'd feel better if people just keep their opinions for themselves and just answer the question to the point :-) As said, no offense. Sounds a little harsh but I don't want to provoke not offend anyone. No hard feelings. ;-) – Lawrence May 1 '15 at 19:17
  • 2
    Possible duplicate of Imitating a blink tag with CSS3 animations – Michael Freidgeim Feb 9 '16 at 20:27
  • Possible duplicate of Using CSS for fade-in effect on page load – zloctb Sep 30 '17 at 3:59
524

You are first setting opacity: 1; and then you are ending it on 0, so it starts from 0% and ends on 100% so instead just set opacity to 0 at 50% and rest will take care of itself.

Demo

.blink_me {
  animation: blinker 1s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes blinker {
  50% {
    opacity: 0;
  }
}
<div class="blink_me">BLINK ME</div>

Here, am setting animation duration should be 1 second, than am setting the timing to linear that means it will be constant throughout, and last am using infinite that means it will go on and on.

Note: If this doesn't work for you, use browser prefixes like -webkit, -moz and so on as required for animation and @keyframes. You can refer to my detailed code here


As commented, this won't work on older versions of Internet Explorer, for that, you need to use jQuery or JavaScript....

(function blink() { 
  $('.blink_me').fadeOut(500).fadeIn(500, blink); 
})();

Thanks to Alnitak for suggesting a better approach.

Demo (Blinker using jQuery)

  • 6
    Just noticed that this, applied to one text element, consumes ridiculous amount of CPU on my computer using firefox. Beware. – Alex Sep 10 '14 at 9:00
  • 1
    best answer for being the most easy to understand solution avialable – elad silver May 17 '15 at 14:27
  • 4
    @Mr.Alien there's no synchronisation between the two - the fades will take a bit longer than the timer (and timers aren't reliable anyway) and eventually you'll likely end up with unbounded queue of animations queued up on the element. The correct approach would be to do without the timer and "recursively" call blinker as the completion callback to the .fadeIn call. – Alnitak Oct 27 '15 at 13:04
  • 1
    @Mr.Alien cf jsfiddle.net/alnitak/wm3808va/1 – Alnitak Oct 27 '15 at 13:20
  • 3
    @Mr.Alien also the whole thing could just be an IIFE - this one line will do the whole thing including initial invocation: (function blink() { $('.blink_me').fadeOut(500).fadeIn(500, blink); })(); – Alnitak Oct 28 '15 at 9:43
64

Use the alternate value for animation-direction (and you don't need to add any keframes this way).

alternate

The animation should reverse direction each cycle. When playing in reverse, the animation steps are performed backward. In addition, timing functions are also reversed; for example, an ease-in animation is replaced with an ease-out animation when played in reverse. The count to determinate if it is an even or an odd iteration starts at one.

CSS:

.waitingForConnection {
  animation: blinker 1.7s cubic-bezier(.5, 0, 1, 1) infinite alternate;  
}
@keyframes blinker { to { opacity: 0; } }

I've removed the from keyframe. If it's missing, it gets generated from the value you've set for the animated property (opacity in this case) on the element, or if you haven't set it (and you haven't in this case), from the default value (which is 1 for opacity).

And please don't use just the WebKit version. Add the unprefixed one after it as well. If you just want to write less code, use the shorthand.

  • How to make it blink faster? Changing 1.7s messes it up. – Alex G Jul 6 '16 at 3:21
  • 1
    @AlexG you could replace the cubic-bezier part with ease-in-out or something else: cubic-bezier.com – Danilo Bargen Aug 4 '16 at 11:27
  • +One for cubic-bezier, because all interesting things are non-linear – Agnius Vasiliauskas Feb 21 at 21:00
39

The best way to get a pure "100% on, 100% off" blink, like the old <blink> is like this:

.blink {
  animation: blinker 1s step-start infinite;
}

@keyframes blinker {
  50% {
    opacity: 0;
  }
}
<div class="blink">BLINK</div>

  • 3
    The only true "blink" solution. And also works with color property etc. Other stuff are workarounds or "fade" animations. – MA-Maddin Feb 4 '18 at 12:48
15

Alternatively if you do not want a gradual transition between show and hide (e.g. a blinking text cursor) you could use something like:

/* Also use prefixes with @keyframes and animation to support current browsers */
@keyframes blinker {  
  from { visibility: visible }
  to { visibility: hidden }

  /* Alternatively you can do this:  
  0% { visibility: visible; }
  50% { visibility: hidden; }
  100% { visibility: visible; }
  if you don't want to use `alternate` */
}
.cursor {
  animation: blinker steps(1) 500ms infinite alternate;
}

Every 1s .cursor will go from visible to hidden.

If CSS animation is not supported (e.g. in some versions of Safari) you can fallback to this simple JS interval:

(function(){
  var show = 'visible'; // state var toggled by interval
  var time = 500; // milliseconds between each interval

  setInterval(function() {
    // Toggle our visible state on each interval
    show = (show === 'hidden') ? 'visible' : 'hidden';

    // Get the cursor elements
    var cursors = document.getElementsByClassName('cursor');
    // We could do this outside the interval callback,
    // but then it wouldn't be kept in sync with the DOM

    // Loop through the cursor elements and update them to the current state
    for (var i = 0; i < cursors.length; i++) {
      cursors[i].style.visibility = show;
    }
  }, time);
})()

This simple JavaScript is actually very fast and in many cases may even be a better default than the CSS. It's worth noting that it is lots of DOM calls that make JS animations slow (e.g. JQuery's $.animate()).

It also has the second advantage that if you add .cursor elements later, they will still animate at exactly the same time as other .cursors since the state is shared, this is impossible with CSS as far as I am aware.

  • This works well EXCEPT for iOS Safari. Any ideas how to get it working on Safari? – Joe Orost Jul 20 '15 at 7:44
  • @JoeOrost I've included a JS alternative for browsers that don't support CSS animations. In my opinion it may actually be a better solution generally! – MattSturgeon Nov 13 '15 at 0:33
12

I don't know why but animating only the visibility property is not working on any browser.

What you can do is animate the opacity property in such a way that the browser doesn't have enough frames to fade in or out the text.

Example:

span {
  opacity: 0;
  animation: blinking 1s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes blinking {
  from,
  49.9% {
    opacity: 0;
  }
  50%,
  to {
    opacity: 1;
  }
}
<span>I'm blinking text</span>

  • 1
    Thanks!!! You saved the day. – Shachi Oct 10 '17 at 7:20
  • 1
    This is silly - just use step-start (see my answer). – Timmmm Jan 18 '18 at 11:43
  • Perfect, just what I was looking for. Thumbs Up. – Samuel Ramzan Sep 21 '18 at 1:41
8
@-webkit-keyframes blinker {  
  0% { opacity: 1.0; }
  50% { opacity: 0.0; }
  100% { opacity: 1.0; }
}
8

Change duration and opacity to suit.

.blink_text { 
    -webkit-animation-name: blinker;
    -webkit-animation-duration: 3s;
    -webkit-animation-timing-function: linear;
    -webkit-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
    -moz-animation-name: blinker;
    -moz-animation-duration: 3s;
    -moz-animation-timing-function: linear;
    -moz-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
    animation-name: blinker;
    animation-duration: 3s;
    animation-timing-function: linear; 
    animation-iteration-count: infinite; color: red; 
} 

@-moz-keyframes blinker {
    0% { opacity: 1.0; }
    50% { opacity: 0.3; }
    100% { opacity: 1.0; } 
}

@-webkit-keyframes blinker { 
    0% { opacity: 1.0; }
    50% { opacity: 0.3; }
    100% { opacity: 1.0; } 
} 

@keyframes blinker { 
    0% { opacity: 1.0; } 
    50% { opacity: 0.3; } 
    100% { opacity: 1.0; } 
}
2

Late but wanted to add a new one with more keyframes ... here is an example on CodePen since there was an issue with the built-in code snippets:

.block{
  display:inline-block;
  padding:30px 50px;
  background:#000;
}
.flash-me {
  color:#fff;
  font-size:40px;
  -webkit-animation: flash linear 1.7s infinite;
  animation: flash linear 1.7s infinite;
}

@-webkit-keyframes flash {
  0% { opacity: 0; } 
  80% { opacity: 1; color:#fff; } 
  83% { opacity: 0; color:#fff; } 
  86% { opacity: 1; color:#fff;}  
  89% { opacity: 0} 
  92% { opacity: 1; color:#fff;} 
  95% { opacity: 0; color:#fff;}
  100% { opacity: 1; color:#fff;}
}
@keyframes flash {
  0% { opacity: 0; } 
  80% { opacity: 1; color:#fff; } 
  83% { opacity: 0; color:#fff; } 
  86% { opacity: 1; color:#fff;}  
  89% { opacity: 0} 
  92% { opacity: 1; color:#fff;} 
  95% { opacity: 0; color:#fff;}
  100% { opacity: 1; color:#fff;}
}
<span class="block">
  <span class="flash-me">Flash Me Hard</span>
</span>

0
<style>
    .class1{
        height:100px;
        line-height:100px;
        color:white;
        font-family:Bauhaus 93;
        padding:25px;
        background-color:#2a9fd4;
        border:outset blue;
        border-radius:25px;
        box-shadow:10px 10px green;
        font-size:45px;
    }
     .class2{
        height:100px;
        line-height:100px;
        color:white;
        font-family:Bauhaus 93;
        padding:25px;
        background-color:green;
        border:outset blue;
        border-radius:25px;
        box-shadow:10px 10px green;
        font-size:65px;
    }
</style>
<script src="jquery-3.js"></script>
<script>
    $(document).ready(function () {
        $('#div1').addClass('class1');
        var flag = true;

        function blink() {
            if(flag)
            {
                $("#div1").addClass('class2');
                flag = false;
            }
            else
            { 
                if ($('#div1').hasClass('class2'))
                    $('#div1').removeClass('class2').addClass('class1');
                flag = true;
            }
        }
        window.setInterval(blink, 1000);
    });
</script>

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