53

I have this code. It is supposed to check if a file exists and open it if it does. It does work if the file exists, and if it doesn't, however, whenever I leave the textbox blank and click the submit button, it fails. What I want, if the textbox is blank is to display the error message just like if the file didn't exist.

Runtime-error "1004"

Dim File As String
File = TextBox1.Value
Dim DirFile As String

DirFile = "C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Desktop\" & File
If Dir(DirFile) = "" Then
  MsgBox "File does not exist"
Else
    Workbooks.Open Filename:=DirFile
End If
2
  • You haven't provided the problem part of the code (ie the Form that contains the Submit button). Can you share your file?
    – brettdj
    Commented May 3, 2013 at 3:52
  • the code above is the content of my submit button Commented May 3, 2013 at 3:58

10 Answers 10

66

something like this

best to use a workbook variable to provide further control (if needed) of the opened workbook

updated to test that file name was an actual workbook - which also makes the initial check redundant, other than to message the user than the Textbox is blank

Dim strFile As String
Dim WB As Workbook
strFile = Trim(TextBox1.Value)
Dim DirFile As String
If Len(strFile) = 0 Then Exit Sub

DirFile = "C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Desktop\" & strFile
If Len(Dir(DirFile)) = 0 Then
  MsgBox "File does not exist"
Else
 On Error Resume Next
 Set WB = Workbooks.Open(DirFile)
 On Error GoTo 0
 If WB Is Nothing Then MsgBox DirFile & " is invalid", vbCritical
End If
3
  • 1
    This method is not 100% reliable since it does not differentiate file name from a folder name.
    – iDevlop
    Commented Aug 19, 2015 at 11:15
  • 1
    @iDevlop I've gone a step to test the filename is valid.
    – brettdj
    Commented Feb 26, 2016 at 11:26
  • Won't work when file name is in unicode. check my posted answer below.
    – Jalal
    Commented Nov 19, 2021 at 0:28
52

I use this function to check for file existence:

Function IsFile(ByVal fName As String) As Boolean
'Returns TRUE if the provided name points to an existing file.
'Returns FALSE if not existing, or if it's a folder
    On Error Resume Next
    IsFile = ((GetAttr(fName) And vbDirectory) <> vbDirectory)
End Function
14
  • 2
    Since you have On Error Resume Next, after your main line I would introduce On Error GoTo 0 just to prevent the error from hanging. Anyways, I like this approach as one can check existence of a file without accidentally checking the existence of a folder.
    – ZygD
    Commented Nov 18, 2015 at 5:37
  • 1
    Does this handle the case where fName is neither a file nor a directory? Seems like a combination of @brettdj and iDevlop's answers would be best: IsFile = ((GetAttr(fName) And vbDirectory) <> vbDirectory) And Len(Dir(DirFile)) <> 0
    – riderBill
    Commented Dec 10, 2015 at 3:21
  • 2
    Investigating further, it appears that GetAttr(fName) will raise exception 53 - FileNotFoundException, invoking Resume Next, and IsFile will keep its prior value (False). So your function does handle all cases. I probably won't test it, but it may also run faster than brettdj's since it doesn't invoke Dir, which looks suspiciously like the system command (?). From my C/C++ experience, invoking a system command takes around 1 second, and maybe another second to resume the executable. Excellent! I up-voted your answer previously. I don't see why this is not the top vote getter.
    – riderBill
    Commented Dec 10, 2015 at 5:13
  • 1
    @iDevlop - I have tested the case once again. if an error is received in this function, when we are back to the caller function, we still have that error. (Error 53: File not found)
    – ZygD
    Commented Dec 10, 2015 at 10:43
  • 4
    @ZygD then you can add an err.clear before the end function. Personnally I always clear err before code area where I'll really handle them.
    – iDevlop
    Commented Dec 10, 2015 at 10:46
34

For checking existence one can also use (works for both, files and folders):

Not Dir(DirFile, vbDirectory) = vbNullString

The result is True if a file or a directory exists.

Example:

If Not Dir("C:\Temp\test.xlsx", vbDirectory) = vbNullString Then
    MsgBox "exists"
Else
    MsgBox "does not exist"
End If
1
  • Won't work when file name is in unicode. check my posted answer below.
    – Jalal
    Commented Nov 27, 2021 at 7:55
5

A way that is clean and short:

Public Function IsFile(s)
    IsFile = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject").FileExists(s)
End Function
1
  • it returns True even if "s" is a folder name :-( Commented Sep 3, 2021 at 19:04
5
Function FileExists(ByRef strFileName As String) As Boolean
' TRUE if the argument is an existing file
' works with Unicode file names
    On Error Resume Next
    Dim objFSO As Object
    Set objFSO = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    FileExists = objFSO.FileExists(strFileName)
    On Error GoTo 0
End Function

To make the function run faster, objFSO can be made a global variable and the code can be modified and saved in a module like this:

Option Explicit
Dim objFSO As Object
Function FileExists(ByRef strFileName As String) As Boolean
' TRUE if the argument is an existing file
' works with Unicode file names
    On Error Resume Next
    If objFSO Is Nothing Then Set objFSO = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    FileExists = objFSO.FileExists(strFileName)
    On Error GoTo 0
End Function

For strFileName to be a unicode string, you can, for example, either get it from a cell value or define it in a special way, as Excel's VBE doesn't save string constants in Unicode. VBE does support Unicode strings already saved in string variables. You're gonna have to look this up for further details.

Hope this helps somebody ^_^

4

Speed of Various FileExists Methods

I needed to check file existence for many of my projects, so I wanted to determine the fastest option. I used the micro timer code (see Benchmarking VBA Code) to run the File Exist functions below the table against a local folder with 2865 files to see which was faster. Winner used GetAttr. Using FSO method for Test 2 was a bit faster with the object defined as a global than not, but not as fast as the GetAttr method.

------------------------------------------------------
% of Fastest                Seconds       Name
------------------------------------------------------
100.00000000000%             0.0237387    Test 1 - GetAttr
7628.42784145720%            1.8108896    Test 2 - FSO (Obj Global)
8360.93687615602%            2.0522254    Test 2 - FSO (Obj in Function)
911.27399562739%             0.2163246    Test 3 - Dir
969.96844814586%             0.2302579    Test 4 - Dir$
969.75108156723%             0.2302063    Test 5 - VBA.Dir
933.82240813524%             0.2216773    Test 6 - VBA.Dir$
7810.66612746275%            1.8541506    Test 7 - Script.FSO

Function FileExistsGA(ByVal FileSpec As String) As Boolean
  ' Karl Peterson MS VB MVP
  Dim Attr As Long
  ' Guard against bad FileSpec by ignoring errors
  ' retrieving its attributes.
  On Error Resume Next
  Attr = GetAttr(FileSpec)
  If Err.Number = 0 Then
    ' No error, so something was found.
    ' If Directory attribute set, then not a file.
    FileExistsGA = Not ((Attr And vbDirectory) = vbDirectory)
  End If
End Function

Function FSOFileExists(sFilePathNameExt As String) As Boolean
    Dim fso As Object
    Set fso = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    FSOFileExists = fso.FileExists(sFilePathNameExt)
    Set fso = Nothing
End Function

Function FileExistsDir(sFilePathNameExt As String) As Boolean
    If Len(Dir(sFilePathNameExt)) > 0 Then FileExistsDir = True
End Function

Function FileExistsDirDollar(sFilePathNameExt As String) As Boolean
    If Len(Dir$(sFilePathNameExt)) > 0 Then FileExistsDirDollar = True
End Function

Function FileExistsVBADirDollar(sFilePathNameExt As String) As Boolean
    If Len(VBA.Dir$(sFilePathNameExt)) > 0 Then FileExistsVBADirDollar = True
End Function

Function FileExistsVBADir(sFilePathNameExt As String) As Boolean
    If Len(VBA.Dir(sFilePathNameExt)) > 0 Then FileExistsVBADir = True
End Function

Public Function IsFileSFSO(s)
    IsFileSFSO = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject").FileExists(s)
End Function

I realize that this does not fully answer the OP, but is provides information on which of the answers provided seems to be most efficient.

2

Maybe it caused by Filename variable

File = TextBox1.Value

It should be

Filename = TextBox1.Value
1
  • 4
    This is not a bad answer. Using "File" or any other keyword as a variablename has caused trouble for a lot of people. Even though this is not a solution to the problem it is still a good point.
    – AnyOneElse
    Commented Dec 17, 2014 at 16:12
0

I'll throw this out there and then duck. The usual reason to check if a file exists is to avoid an error when attempting to open it. How about using the error handler to deal with that:

Function openFileTest(filePathName As String, ByRef wkBook As Workbook, _
                      errorHandlingMethod As Long) As Boolean
'Returns True if filePathName is successfully opened,
'        False otherwise.
   Dim errorNum As Long

'***************************************************************************
'  Open the file or determine that it doesn't exist.
   On Error Resume Next:
   Set wkBook = Workbooks.Open(fileName:=filePathName)
   If Err.Number <> 0 Then
      errorNum = Err.Number
      'Error while attempting to open the file. Maybe it doesn't exist?
      If Err.Number = 1004 Then
'***************************************************************************
      'File doesn't exist.
         'Better clear the error and point to the error handler before moving on.
         Err.Clear
         On Error GoTo OPENFILETEST_FAIL:
         '[Clever code here to cope with non-existant file]
         '...
         'If the problem could not be resolved, invoke the error handler.
         Err.Raise errorNum
      Else
         'No idea what the error is, but it's not due to a non-existant file
         'Invoke the error handler.
         Err.Clear
         On Error GoTo OPENFILETEST_FAIL:
         Err.Raise errorNum
      End If
   End If

   'Either the file was successfully opened or the problem was resolved.
   openFileTest = True
   Exit Function

OPENFILETEST_FAIL:
   errorNum = Err.Number
   'Presumabley the problem is not a non-existant file, so it's
   'some other error. Not sure what this would be, so...
   If errorHandlingMethod < 2 Then
      'The easy out is to clear the error, reset to the default error handler,
      'and raise the error number again.
      'This will immediately cause the code to terminate with VBA's standard
      'run time error Message box:
      errorNum = Err.Number
      Err.Clear
      On Error GoTo 0
      Err.Raise errorNum
      Exit Function

   ElseIf errorHandlingMethod = 2 Then
      'Easier debugging, generate a more informative message box, then terminate:
      MsgBox "" _
           & "Error while opening workbook." _
           & "PathName: " & filePathName & vbCrLf _
           & "Error " & errorNum & ": " & Err.Description & vbCrLf _
           , vbExclamation _
           , "Failure in function OpenFile(), IO Module"
      End

   Else
      'The calling function is ok with a false result. That is the point
      'of returning a boolean, after all.
      openFileTest = False
      Exit Function
   End If

End Function 'openFileTest()
0

Here is my updated code. Checks to see if version exists before saving and saves as the next available version number.

Sub SaveNewVersion()
    Dim fileName As String, index As Long, ext As String
    arr = Split(ActiveWorkbook.Name, ".")
    ext = arr(UBound(arr))

    fileName = ActiveWorkbook.FullName

    If InStr(ActiveWorkbook.Name, "_v") = 0 Then
        fileName = ActiveWorkbook.Path & "\" & Left(ActiveWorkbook.Name, InStr(ActiveWorkbook.Name, ".") - 1) & "_v1." & ext
    End If

   Do Until Len(Dir(fileName)) = 0

        index = CInt(Split(Right(fileName, Len(fileName) - InStr(fileName, "_v") - 1), ".")(0))
        index = index + 1
        fileName = Left(fileName, InStr(fileName, "_v") - 1) & "_v" & index & "." & ext

    'Debug.Print fileName
   Loop

    ActiveWorkbook.SaveAs (fileName)
End Sub
-8

You should set a condition loop to check the TextBox1 value.

If TextBox1.value = "" then
   MsgBox "The file not exist" 
   Exit sub 'exit the macro
End If

Hope it help you.

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