I've got a class salesman in the following format:

class salesman
{
    public string name, address, email;
    public int sales;
}

I've got another class where the user inputs name, address, email and sales. This input is then added to a list

List<salesman> salesmanList = new List<salesman>();

After the user has input as many salesman to the list as they like, they have the option to save the list to a file of their choice (which I can limit to .xml or .txt(which ever is more appropriate)). How would I add this list to the file? Also this file needs to be re-read back into a list if the user wishes to later view the records.

  • 3
    Well, what format do you want the file to be in? You could use XML, .NET binary serialization, Protocol Buffers, Thrift, JSON... lots of choices. Additionally, I strongly recommend that you start following .NET naming conventions, and stop using public fields. – Jon Skeet May 3 '13 at 6:25
  • 1
    I recommend using DataContracts: MSDN Documentation: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms733127.aspx and msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Matthew Watson May 3 '13 at 6:25
  • 1
    Yeah It depends the format you want to store it. You could use xml, protobuf, json. A lot of choices – Carlos Landeras May 3 '13 at 6:36
up vote 40 down vote accepted

Something like this would work. this uses a binary format (the fastest for loading) but the same code would apply to xml with a different serializer.

using System.IO;

    [Serializable]
    class salesman
    {
        public string name, address, email;
        public int sales;
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<salesman> salesmanList = new List<salesman>();
            string dir = @"c:\temp";
            string serializationFile = Path.Combine(dir, "salesmen.bin");

            //serialize
            using (Stream stream = File.Open(serializationFile, FileMode.Create))
            {
                var bformatter = new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();

                bformatter.Serialize(stream, salesmanList);
            }

            //deserialize
            using (Stream stream = File.Open(serializationFile, FileMode.Open))
            {
                var bformatter = new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();

                List<salesman>  salesman = (List<salesman>)bformatter.Deserialize(stream);
            }
        }
    }
  • 1
    thanks! managed to find out what I needed with your help! – Pindo May 3 '13 at 17:48
  • No problem, Glad I could help. – Matt Johnson May 3 '13 at 21:04
  • Was looking for a alternative to writing each item as text.. Great alternative. – Switch Nov 21 '13 at 16:44

I just wrote a blog post on saving an object's data to Binary, XML, or Json; well writing an object or list of objects to a file that is. Here are the functions to do it in the various formats. See my blog post for more details.

Binary

/// <summary>
/// Writes the given object instance to a binary file.
/// <para>Object type (and all child types) must be decorated with the [Serializable] attribute.</para>
/// <para>To prevent a variable from being serialized, decorate it with the [NonSerialized] attribute; cannot be applied to properties.</para>
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of object being written to the XML file.</typeparam>
/// <param name="filePath">The file path to write the object instance to.</param>
/// <param name="objectToWrite">The object instance to write to the XML file.</param>
/// <param name="append">If false the file will be overwritten if it already exists. If true the contents will be appended to the file.</param>
public static void WriteToBinaryFile<T>(string filePath, T objectToWrite, bool append = false)
{
    using (Stream stream = File.Open(filePath, append ? FileMode.Append : FileMode.Create))
    {
        var binaryFormatter = new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();
        binaryFormatter.Serialize(stream, objectToWrite);
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Reads an object instance from a binary file.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of object to read from the XML.</typeparam>
/// <param name="filePath">The file path to read the object instance from.</param>
/// <returns>Returns a new instance of the object read from the binary file.</returns>
public static T ReadFromBinaryFile<T>(string filePath)
{
    using (Stream stream = File.Open(filePath, FileMode.Open))
    {
        var binaryFormatter = new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();
        return (T)binaryFormatter.Deserialize(stream);
    }
}

XML

Requires the System.Xml assembly to be included in your project.

/// <summary>
/// Writes the given object instance to an XML file.
/// <para>Only Public properties and variables will be written to the file. These can be any type though, even other classes.</para>
/// <para>If there are public properties/variables that you do not want written to the file, decorate them with the [XmlIgnore] attribute.</para>
/// <para>Object type must have a parameterless constructor.</para>
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of object being written to the file.</typeparam>
/// <param name="filePath">The file path to write the object instance to.</param>
/// <param name="objectToWrite">The object instance to write to the file.</param>
/// <param name="append">If false the file will be overwritten if it already exists. If true the contents will be appended to the file.</param>
public static void WriteToXmlFile<T>(string filePath, T objectToWrite, bool append = false) where T : new()
{
    TextWriter writer = null;
    try
    {
        var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        writer = new StreamWriter(filePath, append);
        serializer.Serialize(writer, objectToWrite);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (writer != null)
            writer.Close();
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Reads an object instance from an XML file.
/// <para>Object type must have a parameterless constructor.</para>
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of object to read from the file.</typeparam>
/// <param name="filePath">The file path to read the object instance from.</param>
/// <returns>Returns a new instance of the object read from the XML file.</returns>
public static T ReadFromXmlFile<T>(string filePath) where T : new()
{
    TextReader reader = null;
    try
    {
        var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        reader = new StreamReader(filePath);
        return (T)serializer.Deserialize(reader);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (reader != null)
            reader.Close();
    }
}

Json

You must include a reference to Newtonsoft.Json assembly, which can be obtained from the Json.NET NuGet Package.

/// <summary>
/// Writes the given object instance to a Json file.
/// <para>Object type must have a parameterless constructor.</para>
/// <para>Only Public properties and variables will be written to the file. These can be any type though, even other classes.</para>
/// <para>If there are public properties/variables that you do not want written to the file, decorate them with the [JsonIgnore] attribute.</para>
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of object being written to the file.</typeparam>
/// <param name="filePath">The file path to write the object instance to.</param>
/// <param name="objectToWrite">The object instance to write to the file.</param>
/// <param name="append">If false the file will be overwritten if it already exists. If true the contents will be appended to the file.</param>
public static void WriteToJsonFile<T>(string filePath, T objectToWrite, bool append = false) where T : new()
{
    TextWriter writer = null;
    try
    {
        var contentsToWriteToFile = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(objectToWrite);
        writer = new StreamWriter(filePath, append);
        writer.Write(contentsToWriteToFile);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (writer != null)
            writer.Close();
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Reads an object instance from an Json file.
/// <para>Object type must have a parameterless constructor.</para>
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of object to read from the file.</typeparam>
/// <param name="filePath">The file path to read the object instance from.</param>
/// <returns>Returns a new instance of the object read from the Json file.</returns>
public static T ReadFromJsonFile<T>(string filePath) where T : new()
{
    TextReader reader = null;
    try
    {
        reader = new StreamReader(filePath);
        var fileContents = reader.ReadToEnd();
        return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(fileContents);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (reader != null)
            reader.Close();
    }
}

Example

// Write the list of salesman objects to file.
WriteToXmlFile<List<salesman>>("C:\salesmen.txt", salesmanList);

// Read the list of salesman objects from the file back into a variable.
List<salesman> salesmanList = ReadFromXmlFile<List<salesman>>("C:\salesmen.txt");
  • Awesome answer, thanks! Exactly what i was searching for (the XML version is what i needed). :) – Jo Smo May 8 '14 at 13:36
  • Awesome answer, got me exactly what I needed in 30 minutes. – Alex Moreno Nov 24 '15 at 17:23

If you want xml serialization, you can use the built-in serializer. To achieve this, add [Serializable] flag to the class:

[Serializable()]
class salesman
{
    public string name, address, email;
    public int sales;
}

Then, you could override the "ToString()" method which converts the data into xml string:

public override string ToString()
    {
        string sData = "";
        using (MemoryStream oStream = new MemoryStream())
        {
            XmlSerializer oSerializer = new XmlSerializer(this.GetType());
            oSerializer.Serialize(oStream, this);
            oStream.Position = 0;
            sData = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(oStream.ToArray());
        }
        return sData;
    }

Then just create a method that writes this.ToString() into a file.

UPDATE The mentioned above will serialize single entry as xml. If you need the whole list to be serialized, the idea would be a bit different. In this case you'd employ the fact that lists are serializable if their contents are serializable and use the serialization in some outer class.

Example code:

[Serializable()]
class salesman
{
    public string name, address, email;
    public int sales;
}

class salesmenCollection 
{
   List<salesman> salesmanList;

   public void SaveTo(string path){
       System.IO.File.WriteAllText (path, this.ToString());
   }    

   public override string ToString()
   {
     string sData = "";
     using (MemoryStream oStream = new MemoryStream())
      {
        XmlSerializer oSerializer = new XmlSerializer(this.GetType());
        oSerializer.Serialize(oStream, this);
        oStream.Position = 0;
        sData = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(oStream.ToArray());
      }
     return sData;
    }
}
  • 1
    a) No need for Serializable when using XmlSerializer b) OP tries to serialize a List not a single instance of salesman – I4V May 3 '13 at 6:46
  • @I4V Regarding b): The SaveTo() Function will serialize the salesmanList... – Meister Schnitzel Sep 21 '17 at 8:23

If you want to use JSON then using Json.NET is usually the best way to go.

If for some reason you are unable to use Json.NET you can use the built in JSON support found in .NET.

You will need to include the following using statement and add a reference for System.Web.Extentsions.

using System.Web.Script.Serialization;

Then you would use these to Serialize and Deserialize your object.

//Deserialize JSON to your Object
YourObject obj = new JavaScriptSerializer().Deserialize<YourObject>("File Contents");

//Serialize your object to JSON
string sJSON = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(YourObject);

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.script.serialization.javascriptserializer_methods(v=vs.110).aspx

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