79
 function leapYear(year){
    var result; 
    year = parseInt(document.getElementById("isYear").value);
    if (years/400){
      result = true
    }
    else if(years/100){
      result = false
    }
    else if(years/4){
      result= true
    }
    else{
      result= false
    }
    return result
 }

This is what I have so far (the entry is on a from thus stored in "isYear"), I basically followed this here, so using what I already have, how can I check if the entry is a leap year based on these conditions(note I may have done it wrong when implementing the pseudocode, please correct me if I have) Edit: Note this needs to use an integer not a date function

2
184
function leapYear(year)
{
  return ((year % 4 == 0) && (year % 100 != 0)) || (year % 400 == 0);
}
14
  • Glad I could help. You can just use ´((year % 4 == 0) && (year % 100 != 0)) || (year % 400 == 0)´ where you need it if you don't want a function. I find functions helpful for having good human readable code though. – MMeersseman May 3 '13 at 7:04
  • 2
    FYI: This seems to be much more performant than isLeap (below) -- jsfiddle.net/atwright147/7dqzvzpr – atwright147 Jul 10 '15 at 14:39
  • 4
    the fastest ever!!! can be reduced to that ... which speeds up a bit function isLeap (y) { return !((y % 4) || (!(y % 100) && y % 400)); } – fedeghe Aug 26 '15 at 14:23
  • 2
    @fedeghe And I thought I had made the most concise one !(y%4)&&(!(y%400)||!!(y%100)); until I read your comment, but you did the inverse logic and saved two characters yet! Haha. Very well done. – bit-less Jun 30 '17 at 16:26
  • 1
    @fedeghe What about !(y&3||y&15&&!(y%25));? See stackoverflow.com/q/9852837/3167040 for details! – ReinstateMonica3167040 Jul 26 '17 at 23:59
55

The function checks if February has 29 days. If it does, then we have a leap year.

ES5

function isLeap(year) {
  return new Date(year, 1, 29).getDate() === 29;
}

ES6

const isLeap = year => new Date(year, 1, 29).getDate() === 29;

Result

isLeap(1004) // true
isLeap(1001) // false
3
  • 11
    I actually like this solution the best, because it doesn't require any underlying knowledge of the gregorian calendar. – Matt Korostoff Nov 4 '17 at 0:37
  • Does not work for inputs 0000 to 0099 – inetphantom Aug 22 '18 at 21:35
  • 5
    @inetphantom the issue you just described is like reverse y2k – Matt Korostoff Jul 26 '19 at 3:36
6

A faster solution is provided by Kevin P. Rice here:https://stackoverflow.com/a/11595914/5535820 So here's the code:

function leapYear(year)
{
    return (year & 3) == 0 && ((year % 25) != 0 || (year & 15) == 0);
}
1
2

If you're doing this in an Node.js app, you can use the leap-year package:

npm install --save leap-year

Then from your app, use the following code to verify whether the provided year or date object is a leap year:

var leapYear = require('leap-year');

leapYear(2014);
//=> false 

leapYear(2016);
//=> true 

Using a library like this has the advantage that you don't have to deal with the dirty details of getting all of the special cases right, since the library takes care of that.

5
  • 16
    But you're adding yet another dependency to your project for such a simple function. That's a no-no for me. – Frondor Jul 23 '18 at 16:57
  • 10
    Pulling in a package to check for three division remainders is frankly ridiculous. – Kuba Szymanowski Aug 1 '18 at 9:56
  • 2
    Is it? If you take a look at the wrong answers in this question (people simply dividing by 4 and checking the remainder), using a library would probably be a wise decision for some people. The advantage of the library is that it includes test cases and has a better chance of working than people coming up with their own wrong implementation (see below for a couple of examples). Having said that, I understand that writing your own quick function (if you get it right) saves you from including one dependency - to each their own. – nwinkler Aug 1 '18 at 9:59
  • 3
    On the other hand, all of this might be overkill anyway. The next year where the simply year % 4 does not work is 2100, which most of the software built today is not going to see anyway. Add <irony> tags if you like... – nwinkler Aug 1 '18 at 10:03
  • right, and while a decent amount of software needs to handle 2000, 2000 also is a leap year. so unless your software needs to handle 1900 you're good – MalcolmOcean Oct 17 '20 at 0:03
0

You can use the following code to check if it's a leap year:

ily = function(yr) {
    return (yr % 400) ? ((yr % 100) ? ((yr % 4) ? false : true) : false) : true;
}
4
  • 1
    Could you elaborate a bit? – tsnorri Mar 30 '15 at 17:46
  • 2
    This seems like just a refactoring of the accepted answer. It's not any more compact or performing any different operations, so I'm not sure what value it would add. – Matt Johnson-Pint Mar 30 '15 at 17:55
  • 10
    this is pretty much molesting the ternary operator – Willem D'Haeseleer Feb 10 '16 at 1:39
  • 1
    This will be inefficient as it is always checking if a year is divisible by 400. You are getting 399 times False and one time True – Daut Feb 4 '19 at 13:49
-10

You can try using JavaScript's Date Object

new Date(year,month).getFullYear()%4==0

This will return true or false.

1
  • 7
    It doesn't handle special cases (divisibility by 100 and 400). – Pif Nov 20 '13 at 13:41
-11

My Code Is Very Easy To Understand

var year = 2015;
var LeapYear = year % 4;

if (LeapYear==0) {
    alert("This is Leap Year");
} else {
    alert("This is not leap year");
}
2
  • 7
    Your code is incorrect. 1900 was not a leap year, but your code will say that it was. – user149341 Aug 22 '16 at 1:38
  • 2
    Neither is it very easy to understand nor it is correct. – Eugen Sunic Jul 29 '18 at 12:23

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