13

I am not sure if there is a standard way of doing this. I have implemented the following function to dump all contents of an object. It must recursively dump sub-objects, so I am checking for InstanceType, but it does not work:

import types

def dump_obj(obj, level=0):
    for a in dir(obj):
        try:
            if type(obj.__dict__[a]) == types.InstanceType:
                dump_obj(obj.__dict__[a], level + 2)
            else:
                try:
                    print " " * level + "%s -> %s" % (a, obj.__dict__[a])
                except:
                    pass
        except:
            pass

How can I verify if an element is itself an object?

What I actually want is the following. Given:

class B:
  def __init__(self):
    self.txt = 'bye'

class A:
  def __init__(self):
    self.txt = 'hello'
    self.b = B()

a = A()

dump_obj(a)

I want the following output:

txt -> hello
  txt -> bye
2
  • Everything is an object in Python.
    – Matthias
    May 3 '13 at 8:18
  • Ok: how can I verify if an element is of types.InstanceType (or whatever is needed), so that I can trigger recursion?
    – blueFast
    May 3 '13 at 8:19
18

This will recursively dump any object and all sub-objects. The other answers worked for simple examples, but for complex objects, they were missing some data.

import jsonpickle # pip install jsonpickle
import json

serialized = jsonpickle.encode(obj)
print(json.dumps(json.loads(serialized), indent=2))

EDIT: If you use YAML format, it will be even closer to your example.

import yaml # pip install pyyaml
print(yaml.dump(yaml.load(serialized), indent=2))
1
  • Great, general answer. Because I just had to spend time working out which combination of load and loads recovered the dump, here is the decoder: frozen = json.load(save_file) thawed = jsonpickle.decode(json.dumps(frozen)) print(thawed)
    – AlDante
    Aug 16 at 14:55
8

Your code works for me, except that things get printed in the wrong order (inner first, which is what I actually would expect with recursion).

So, I changed the order (and used isinstance() as well as iterating over the __dict__):

import types

def dump_obj(obj, level=0):
    for key, value in obj.__dict__.items():
        if not isinstance(value, types.InstanceType):
             print " " * level + "%s -> %s" % (key, value)
        else:
            dump_obj(value, level + 2)

class B:
  def __init__ (self):
    self.txt = 'bye'

class A:
  def __init__(self):
    self.txt = 'hello'
    self.b = B()

a = A()

dump_obj(a)

produces

txt -> hello
  txt -> bye
2
  • This worked for simple examples, but for a complex object, it was missing some data in the sub-objects.
    – wisbucky
    Mar 4 '16 at 19:12
  • This worked nice! Was getting AttributeError in answer above. Jun 1 '18 at 17:48
4

It is always better to use isinstance(x, y) instead of type(x) == y.

Since everything is an object in Python, it doesn't make sense to do isinstance(attr, object), because (I guess) it always returns true.

Your best bet is to "blacklist" certain types. For example, you check if it's other than int, float, str, unicode, list, dict, set, ... you go deeper, otherwise you just print it.

For example:

def dump(obj, level=0):
   for a in dir(obj):
      val = getattr(obj, a)
      if isinstance(val, (int, float, str, unicode, list, dict, set)):
           print level*' ', val
      else:
           dump(val, level=level+1)

UPDATE: isinstance takes into account inheritance, so if you try to see if an object is an instance of a parent class, it will return True while it may not when using type.

Since in this case you'll be testing against primitive types, it may not make any difference in this case, but in general isinstance is preferable.

See this example:

>>> class A(object): pass
... 
>>> class B(A): pass
... 
>>> a, b = A(), B()
>>> type(a)
<class '__main__.A'>
>>> type(a) == A
True
>>> type(b)
<class '__main__.B'>
>>> type(b) == B
True
>>> type(b) == A
False
>>> 

You can check out the docs

3
  • Thanks, I ended doing something similar to this, but using type() ==. Could you elaborate on why it is better to use isinstance?
    – blueFast
    May 3 '13 at 8:44
  • You are right, and my example was simplified: actually I want to dump complex objects from standard libraries, so your caveat is relevant. On the other hand, getattr also returns methods and other things, which cause infinite recursion.
    – blueFast
    May 3 '13 at 9:12
  • 3
    for a in dir(obj): instead of for attr in dir(obj): Jan 16 '15 at 15:50

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