13

I have 2 lists:

first_lst = [('-2.50', 0.49, 0.52), ('-2.00', 0.52, 0.50)]
second_lst = [('-2.50', '1.91', '2.03'), ('-2.00', '1.83', '2.08')]

I want to do the following math to it:

Multiply 0.49 by 1.91 (the corresponding values from first_lst and second_lst), and multiply 0.52 by 2.03 (corresponding values also). I want to do that under condition that values at position 0 in each corresponding tuple is idential so -2.50 == -2.50 etc. Obviously, we do the same math for remaning tuples as well.

My code:

[((fir[0], float(fir[1])*float(sec[1]), float(fir[2])*float(sec[2])) for fir in first_lst) for sec in second_lst if fir[0] == sec[0]]

Generates however some object:

[<generator object <genexpr> at 0x0223E2B0>]

Can you help me fix the code?

3
  • 1
    Your tuples have mismatching types of string and float. Is that intentional or just an error? Your LC would fail if you have these as your tuples. Since float cannot be multiplied to a string. See my answer to fix that error. May 4 '13 at 11:12
  • I had written this code before I realized I needed to convert everything to float. Will edit it now not to confuse anyone. Thanks for pointing it out.
    – nutship
    May 4 '13 at 11:14
  • Well Ashwini's answer solves the problem. Generally when you are using list comprehensions, you have to typecast/store the final result into either a list or a tuple.
    – Sagar_c_k
    Jul 18 '17 at 20:21
22

You need to use tuple() or list() to convert that generator expression to a list or tuple:

[tuple((fir[0], fir[1]*sec[1], fir[2]*sec[2]) for fir in first_lst)\
                               for sec in second_lst if fir[0] == sec[0]]

Working version of your code:

>>> first_lst = [tuple(float(y) for y in x) for x in first_lst]
>>> second_lst = [tuple(float(y) for y in x) for x in second_lst]

>>> [((fir[0],) + tuple(x*y for x, y in zip(fir[1:], sec[1:]))) \
                  for fir in first_lst for sec in second_lst if fir[0]==sec[0]]
[(-2.5, 0.9359, 1.0555999999999999), (-2.0, 0.9516000000000001, 1.04)]
5
  • Strangely though, this code gives a fir is not defined. error. Is that a problem on my side? May 4 '13 at 11:00
  • @SukritKalra the names used in this LC are different from what OP posted. May 4 '13 at 11:01
  • His comprehension gives the same error instead of creating a generator object. May 4 '13 at 11:02
  • @SukritKalra You must be using first_lst and second_lst as the variables names for your tuples. May 4 '13 at 11:04
  • Yes, I am. I don't get why that fails the LC. Also, OP has half of his tuple in float and half in string, so, the LC would fail, you could convert the string to float explicitly. May 4 '13 at 11:09
2

Considering that your first_lst and second_lst are defined as follows.

>>> first_lst = [('-2.50', '0.49', '0.52'), ('-2.00', '0.52', '0.50')]
>>> second_lst = [('-2.50', '1.91', '2.03'), ('-2.00', '1.83', '2.08')]

The following list comprehension may be useful.

>>> [tuple((float(elem[0][0]), float(elem[0][1])*float(elem[1][1]), float(elem[0][2])*float(elem[1][2]))) for elem in zip(first_lst, second_lst) if elem[0][0]==elem[1][0]]
[(-2.5, 0.9359, 1.0555999999999999), (-2.0, 0.9516000000000001, 1.04)]
4
  • btw. why if I wanted to add else statement at the end would raise an error invalid syntax. like this: if elem[0][0]==elem[1][0] else pass] It's not at odds with python docs I checked it up now.
    – nutship
    May 4 '13 at 11:20
  • zip will only work for elements on the same index, and If I am not wrong then OP is trying to multiply any two tuple whole first elements are same. May 4 '13 at 11:25
  • He says each corresponding tuple, so I thought he wanted to work on those with same index. May 4 '13 at 11:27
  • 1
    To answer OP's question, you can do that just put the for statement in the end. Like so. [tuple((float(elem[0][0]), float(elem[0][1])*float(elem[1][1]), float(elem[0][2])*float(elem[1][2]))) if elem[0][0]==elem[1][0] else '' for elem in zip(first_lst, second_lst)] For some reason pass and continue don't work, but you won't need them anyways, if you're trying to skip, the LC will do it anyway. May 4 '13 at 11:27
2

i had the same problem and found a simpler answer for your question. only thing you need to do is using original for loop syntax and it works nicely!

this is working version of your code:

ans=[]
for fir in first_lst:
    for sec in second_lst:
        if float(fir[0])==float(sec[0]):
             ans.append([fir[0],float(fir[1])*float(sec[1]),float(fir[2])*float(sec[2])])

print(ans)

output=[['-2.50', 0.9359, 1.0555999999999999], ['-2.00', 0.9516000000000001, 1.04]]
0

There are 2 issues to look at.

The original code will generate the error:

>>> first_lst = [('-2.50', 0.49, 0.52), ('-2.00', 0.52, 0.50)]
>>> second_lst = [('-2.50', '1.91', '2.03'), ('-2.00', '1.83', '2.08')]
>>> [((fir[0], float(fir[1])*float(sec[1]), float(fir[2])*float(sec[2])) for fir in first_lst) for sec in second_lst if fir[0] == sec[0]]
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <listcomp>
NameError: name 'fir' is not defined
>>>

and <generator object <genexpr> message is mentioned.

1) Let's fix the the code with minimum amount of changes by creating list comprehension:

>>> first_lst = [('-2.50', 0.49, 0.52), ('-2.00', 0.52, 0.50)]
>>> second_lst = [('-2.50', '1.91', '2.03'), ('-2.00', '1.83', '2.08')]
>>> [(fir[0],fir[1]*float(sec[1]),fir[2]*float(sec[2])) for fir in first_lst for sec in second_lst if fir[0] == sec[0]] # list comprehension
[('-2.50', 0.9359, 1.0555999999999999), ('-2.00', 0.9516000000000001, 1.04)]
>>>

2) In the original code, the bracket after first_lst ) is misplaced. If we place that bracket after the sec[0] instead of list comprehension we get generator expression. And that will cause the <generator object <genexpr> message:

>>> [((fir[0],fir[1]*float(sec[1]),fir[2]*float(sec[2])) for fir in first_lst for sec in second_lst if fir[0] == sec[0])]  # generator object
[<generator object <genexpr> at 0x00000184EEDE29E8>]

In terms of syntax, the only difference is that one uses parenthesis instead of square brackets.

Note: If needed, there are two ways to convert a generator object to the list:

2a) Use asterisk (*) operator to unpack object to the list

>>> [*((fir[0],fir[1]*float(sec[1]),fir[2]*float(sec[2])) for fir in first_lst for sec in second_lst if fir[0] == sec[0])]
[('-2.50', 0.9359, 1.0555999999999999), ('-2.00', 0.9516000000000001, 1.04)]
>>>

2b) Use explicitly list()

>>> list((fir[0],fir[1]*float(sec[1]),fir[2]*float(sec[2])) for fir in first_lst for sec in second_lst if fir[0] == sec[0])
[('-2.50', 0.9359, 1.0555999999999999), ('-2.00', 0.9516000000000001, 1.04)]
>>>
0

Instead of tuple or list, you are making the generators

first_lst = [('-2.50', 0.49, 0.52), ('-2.00', 0.52, 0.50)]
second_lst = [('-2.50', '1.91', '2.03'), ('-2.00', '1.83', '2.08')]
[(fir[0],fir[1]*float(sec[1]),fir[2]*float(sec[2])) for fir in first_lst for sec in 
second_lst if fir[0] == sec[0]] 
output:-[('-2.50', 0.9359, 1.0555999999999999), ('-2.00', 0.9516000000000001, 1.04)]

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