4

Bit of a simple question really, but I can't seem to crack it. I have a string that is formatted in the following way:

["category1",("data","data","data")]
["category2", ("data","data","data")]

I call the different categories posts and I want to get the most frequent words from the data section. So I tried:

from nltk.tokenize import wordpunct_tokenize
from collections import defaultdict
freq_dict = defaultdict(int)

for cat, text2 in posts:
   tokens = wordpunct_tokenize(text2)
   for token in tokens:
       if token in freq_dict:
           freq_dict[token] += 1
       else:
           freq_dict[token] = 1
   top = sorted(freq_dict, key=freq_dict.get, reverse=True)
   top = top[:50]
   print top

However, this will give me the top words PER post in the string.

I need a general top words list.
However if I take print top out of the for loop, it only gives me the results of the last post.
Does anyone have an idea?

  • Do you want to count the occurrence of every unique word in all the tuples combined? – Janus Troelsen May 4 '13 at 14:35
  • What does wordpunct_tokenize do? It would be easier to help you if we could execute the code you posted. Does it always take a triple or would it work with any length? – Janus Troelsen May 4 '13 at 14:36
  • wordpunct comes from the nltk package and tokenizes the string from nltk.tokenize import wordpunct_tokeniz, changed it in the question. And no, I just want the most frequent words from all the posts combined. – Shifu May 4 '13 at 14:38
  • 5
    you probably want to take a look at Counter – soulcheck May 4 '13 at 14:40
  • 3
    @Nikolaas: Please use a better headline next time. You question is not "for loop, pretty simple". You question is "how do I find the most common words in multiple seperate texts?" – Janus Troelsen May 4 '13 at 15:04
3

Why not just use Counter?

In [30]: from collections import Counter

In [31]: data=["category1",("data","data","data")]

In [32]: Counter(data[1])
Out[32]: Counter({'data': 3})

In [33]: Counter(data[1]).most_common()
Out[33]: [('data', 3)]
  • Still doesn't show how to best chain the texts (after tokenization) and get a specific number of most common words. Check my answer. – Janus Troelsen May 4 '13 at 15:11
  • but, is there no way to make it work like I did it? – Shifu May 4 '13 at 15:26
  • 2
    @Nikolaas: Of course, we already did that. But it is unnecessarily complex to write your own counter when you can just use the one in the standard library. The best code is no code at all. – Janus Troelsen May 4 '13 at 15:32
  • You already did? where would that be? – Shifu May 4 '13 at 16:11
3

This is a scope problem. Also, you don't need to initialize the elements of defaultdict, so this simplifies your code:

Try it like this:

posts = [["category1",("data1 data2 data3")],["category2", ("data1 data3 data5")]]

from nltk.tokenize import wordpunct_tokenize
from collections import defaultdict
freq_dict = defaultdict(int)

for cat, text2 in posts:
   tokens = wordpunct_tokenize(text2)
   for token in tokens:
      freq_dict[token] += 1

top = sorted(freq_dict, key=freq_dict.get, reverse=True)
top = top[:50]
print top

This, as expected, outputs

['data1', 'data3', 'data5', 'data2']

as a result.

If you really have something like

posts = [["category1",("data1","data2","data3")],["category2", ("data1","data3","data5")]]

as an input, you won't need wordpunct_tokenize() as the input data is already tokenized. Then, the following would work:

posts = [["category1",("data1","data2","data3")],["category2", ("data1","data3","data5")]]

from collections import defaultdict
freq_dict = defaultdict(int)

for cat, tokens in posts:
   for token in tokens:
      freq_dict[token] += 1

top = sorted(freq_dict, key=freq_dict.get, reverse=True)
top = top[:50]
print top

and it also outputs the expected result:

['data1', 'data3', 'data5', 'data2']
  • actually I did already initiate the freq_dict, I just did not write it in my post, I will edit it now. – Shifu May 4 '13 at 14:40
  • freq_dict is a default dict, and anyway freq_dict cannot be a list as token is not an integer but a Token object. So, it cannot be a list index! – pradyunsg May 4 '13 at 14:44
  • @Nikolaas I removed the offending line from the listing. – likeitlikeit May 4 '13 at 14:47
  • @Nikolaas added more information about the different input formats that might apply. If you really have the input format stated in your question, have a look at the second listing because you won't need wordpunct_tokenize() at all. Have fun... – likeitlikeit May 4 '13 at 16:35
2
from itertools import chain
from collections import Counter
from nltk.tokenize import wordpunct_tokenize
texts=["a quick brown car", "a fast yellow rose", "a quick night rider", "a yellow officer"]
print Counter(chain.from_iterable(wordpunct_tokenize(x) for x in texts)).most_common(3)

outputs:

[('a', 4), ('yellow', 2), ('quick', 2)]

As you can see in the documentation for Counter.most_common, the returned list is sorted.

To use with your code, you can do

texts = (x[1] for x in posts)

or you can do

... wordpunct_tokenize(x[1]) for x in texts ...

If your posts actually look like this:

posts=[("category1",["a quick brown car", "a fast yellow rose"]), ("category2",["a quick night rider", "a yellow officer"])]

You can get rid of the categories:

texts = list(chain.from_iterable(x[1] for x in posts))

(texts will be ['a quick brown car', 'a fast yellow rose', 'a quick night rider', 'a yellow officer'])

You can then use that in the snippet of the top of this answer.

  • instead of list comprehension it would be better to use a generator expression – soulcheck May 4 '13 at 15:02
  • @soulcheck: Why? All of it would be read anyway. I think you'll get better spatial locality like this, and better performance. – Janus Troelsen May 4 '13 at 15:05
  • i imagine posts can be quite large. it also doesn't make sense to create a collection only to iterate it once and throw it away. – soulcheck May 4 '13 at 15:07
  • Ahh, you meant for the posts, thought you meant for the tokenized data. – Janus Troelsen May 4 '13 at 15:08
  • That's a good approach, but why not chain.from_iterable(wordpunct_tokenize(x) for x in texts)? Soulcheck is right, you can get rid of the list comprehension. – Adam May 4 '13 at 15:16
1

Just change your code to allow for the posts to be processed and then get the top words:

from nltk.tokenize import wordpunct_tokenize
from collections import defaultdict

freq_dict = defaultdict(int)

for cat, text2 in posts:
   tokens = wordpunct_tokenize(text2)
   for token in tokens:
       freq_dict[token] += 1
# get top after all posts have been processed.
top = sorted(freq_dict, key=freq_dict.get, reverse=True)
top = top[:50]
print top
  • 1
    You're first, you win – Janus Troelsen May 4 '13 at 14:40
  • still only get the results from the last post in the loop, so it does not work. – Shifu May 4 '13 at 14:46
  • 1
    @Nikolaas: Why do you think that? – Janus Troelsen May 4 '13 at 14:46
  • @Nikolaas Could you post the value of posts?? Because if that's the case it would be helpful for us to see the input, to verify the output... – pradyunsg May 4 '13 at 14:47
  • 1
    @eandersson: Fixed – Janus Troelsen May 4 '13 at 15:35

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