71

I'm learning how to use pickle. I've created a namedtuple object, appended it to a list, and tried to pickle that list. However, I get the following error:

pickle.PicklingError: Can't pickle <class '__main__.P'>: it's not found as __main__.P

I found that if I ran the code without wrapping it inside a function, it works perfectly. Is there an extra step required to pickle an object when wrapped inside a function?

Here is my code:

from collections import namedtuple
import pickle

def pickle_test():
    P = namedtuple("P", "one two three four")
    my_list = []
    abe = P("abraham", "lincoln", "vampire", "hunter")
    my_list.append(abe)
    with open('abe.pickle', 'wb') as f:
        pickle.dump(abe, f)
    
pickle_test()
8
  • 1
    Unfortunately, pickle doesn't seem to work well with namedtuples.
    – Antimony
    Commented May 4, 2013 at 17:48
  • 10
    @Antimony: pickle handles namedtuple classes just fine; classes defined in a function local namespace not so much. Commented May 4, 2013 at 23:37
  • 2
    possible duplicate of Python: Can't pickle type X, attribute lookup failed
    – Air
    Commented Jun 17, 2014 at 2:23
  • @AirThomas This question was asked/answered a year ago :) Commented Jun 17, 2014 at 20:01
  • 2
    None taken. I just thought it was funny. Question linking is very useful indeed :) Commented Jun 17, 2014 at 20:23

5 Answers 5

97

Create the named tuple outside of the function:

from collections import namedtuple
import pickle

P = namedtuple("P", "one two three four")

def pickle_test():
    my_list = []
    abe = P("abraham", "lincoln", "vampire", "hunter")
    my_list.append(abe)
    with open('abe.pickle', 'wb') as f:
        pickle.dump(abe, f)

pickle_test()

Now pickle can find it; it is a module global now. When unpickling, all the pickle module has to do is locate __main__.P again. In your version, P is a local, to the pickle_test() function, and that is not introspectable or importable.

Note that pickle stores just the module and the class name, as taken from the class's __name__ attribute. Make sure that the first argument of the namedtuple() call matches the global variable you are assigning to; P.__name__ must be "P"!

It is important to remember that namedtuple() is a class factory; you give it parameters and it returns a class object for you to create instances from. pickle only stores the data contained in the instances, plus a string reference to the original class to reconstruct the instances again.

11
  • 10
    So, what if I am creating the namedtuple dynamically because I don't know the fields until runtime? Is there still a way to bypass this issue? I tried creating another method outside of the class but that didn't work.
    – Chuim
    Commented Jun 26, 2013 at 19:53
  • 8
    @Chuim: Assign it to your module globals (use globals() to get a mapping) under the same name, and pickle can find it still. Commented Jun 26, 2013 at 21:12
  • If you are creating multiple namedtuples with dynamic fields, unpickling won't work after you override P in globals. Commented Aug 1, 2020 at 19:20
  • @DavitTovmasyan: No, each class needs a separate name. Commented Aug 1, 2020 at 19:28
  • It doesn't seem to be working on Python 3.x
    – facehugger
    Commented Nov 29, 2021 at 5:45
14

I found this answer in another thread.

For pickling to work correctly, the variable assigned to the namedtuple must have the same name as the namedtuple itself

group_t =            namedtuple('group_t', 'field1, field2')  # this will work
mismatched_group_t = namedtuple('group_t', 'field1, field2')  # this will throw the error
0
11

After I added my question as a comment to the main answer I found a way to solve the problem of making a dynamically created namedtuple pickle-able. This is required in my case because I'm figuring out its fields only at runtime (after a DB query).

All I do is monkey patch the namedtuple by effectively moving it to the __main__ module:

def _CreateNamedOnMain(*args):
    import __main__
    namedtupleClass = collections.namedtuple(*args)
    setattr(__main__, namedtupleClass.__name__, namedtupleClass)
    namedtupleClass.__module__ = "__main__"
    return namedtupleClass

Mind that the namedtuple name (which is provided by args) might overwrite another member in __main__ if you're not careful.

3
  • 20
    Simply set it on globals() instead: globals()[namedtupleClass.__name__] = namedtupleClass. Then there is no need to set the __module__. Commented Jun 26, 2013 at 21:13
  • When I tried globals()[namedtupleClass.__name__] = namedtupleClass it did indeed allow me to pickle my object, but when I tried to unpickle it didn't have the namedtupleClass it needed. My advice is to just use a dictionary until they make pickle smart enough to do this.
    – Teque5
    Commented Jan 20, 2017 at 21:55
  • @Teque5 it works as long as then name you pass to namedtuple() is unique in the the module Commented Feb 2, 2022 at 13:31
6

Alternatively, you can use cloudpickle or dill for serialization:

from collections import namedtuple

import cloudpickle
import dill



def dill_test(dynamic_names):
    P = namedtuple('P', dynamic_names)
    my_list = []
    abe = P("abraham", "lincoln", "vampire", "hunter")
    my_list.append(abe)
    with open('deleteme.cloudpickle', 'wb') as f:
        cloudpickle.dump(abe, f)
    with open('deleteme.dill', 'wb') as f:
        dill.dump(abe, f)


dill_test("one two three four")
0
2

The issue here is the child processes aren't able to import the class of the object -in this case, the class P-, in the case of a multi-model project the Class P should be importable anywhere the child process get used

a quick workaround is to make it importable by affecting it to globals()

globals()["P"] = P

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