An Arduino Leonardo gets detected in Device Manager, but then it gets disconnected.

So, this is what I am doing. Connecting Arduino Leonardo to my laptop. It gets detected in Device Manager (I have updated the driver as well). However, I soon hear a beep and the Leonardo gets uninstalled. If I push the 'Reset' button it gets detected again. However, after a few seconds it gets disconnected again. The Device Manager displays the message

Currently, this hardware device is not connected to the computer. (Code 45)

Note: It was working fine a couple of weeks ago. I am using Windows 7.

looks like a problem whit the soft-reset of the leonardo, normaly whe you connect the leonardo, it appears on the device manager like Ard...bootloader(COMX), for a few seconds and then Leonardo appears in a different COM port. I know, in your case after that just dessappear. try to select that port in the arduino IDE, then you have to try to load some sketch like blink.ino, and press the reset button at the same time, then when the sketch is beginning to be uploaded release de reset, tha works for me,

  • Just to add on this answer, I hit the Upload and waited until compiling was completed, as soon as it said uploading I hit the reset button on the leonardo and successfully uploaded the blink sketch to my board. Now that the board got a good sketch on it, it shows up properly in my list of COM ports. – seattleandrew Feb 17 at 4:28

I had exactly the same problem. After pushing Reset my Arduino Micro first got detected normally. Here's the corresponding excerpt from my /var/log/syslog (without the timestamps etc.):

usb 6-1: new full-speed USB device number 56 using uhci_hcd
usb 6-1: New USB device found, idVendor=2341, idProduct=0037
usb 6-1: New USB device strings: Mfr=2, Product=1, SerialNumber=0
usb 6-1: Product: Arduino Micro   
usb 6-1: Manufacturer: Arduino LLC
cdc_acm 6-1:1.0: ttyACM3: USB ACM device

But only a few seconds later it got disconnected:

usb 6-1: USB disconnect, device number 56

After a long search I found how you can recover from this fatal situation:

  • Connect your Arduino via USB cable.
  • Open the Arduino IDE and load the "Blink" example.
  • Open a shell and enter: tail -f /var/log/syslog This is for observing with /dev/tty port the Arduino gets associated
  • Now you must be fast: Reset the Arduino, see what /dev/tty port it gets and choose that port in the IDE under the menu Tools / Serial Port. You must do this before the Arduino disconnects again or else the correct menu point won't be accessible. You probably need one or two tries before you get it. That was the hard part.
  • Press again Reset on the Arduino and, immediately after, press the Upload button in the Arduino IDE.
  • Your Arduino should start the blink program shortly after the Upload and is "healed".

After some more investigation I found the reason for the whole misery: In some forgotten source code of some forgotten file there was a main() function (I had written that one for some tests under Linux/g++ some weeks before). The compiler now preferred to use that main() instead of the standard main() from the IDE environment. The result is that the USB gets disconnected, probably because the original main() does some initialisation which now was missing.

  • This solution works perfectly. Reproduced a couple of times. Thanks. Although, I don't have a main() in my code, so I'm still not sure why it causes such problem. – Mohamed Tarek Jan 24 '15 at 0:51
  • figured out the problem, bad memory access in an SPI read. – Mohamed Tarek Jan 24 '15 at 1:06

Make sure that nothing, rather than the USB cable, is connected to the Arduino and try again. If the problem persist, try to replace the cable and test it on a different USB port.

Try also to read the post Windows Not recognizing Uno. If you can see the Arduino in the Device Manager for few seconds, try to reinstall the drivers. The drivers are in the Arduino IDE folder.

  • I tried different USB cable, reinstalled the drivers. Still its not working – alps May 5 '13 at 19:57
  • Have you tested on another computer. This may help you to understand if the problem is the PC or the Arduino. – FeliceM May 6 '13 at 8:36
  • I have tested it on another computer. Same result. I have burnt the bootloader as well. However as soon as I try to upload the driver gets uninstalled. – alps May 7 '13 at 19:40
  • So, it is clear that the Arduino you are using has a problem. Thats it. Your Arduino is faulty. – FeliceM May 8 '13 at 2:31

Since I cannot add a comment (not registered) I will say it here:

Guy's solution above works. However, setting the proper port (after detecting it by running 'tail -f /var/syslog') can be done in a much simpler way. You don't have to quickly open the Tools->port menu and select the proper one after board reset. (Anyway, in my IDE the port does not appear even after I reset the board.) Open the file 'preferences.txt' in $HOME/.arduino and set 'serial.port' to the detected value. Start the IDE and start uploading the 'blink' skecth. Press reset when compiling is finished and uploading starts.

Note: I tested this with a genuine Leonardo on Xubunbtu Linux 64-bit, IDE version 2:1.0.5 (from the Ubuntu repository).

You know about those ICSP "mystery" pins? Take an UNO and add the needed "arduino as programmer" code to it, wire the Leonardo to the UNO and now you can program the Leonardo - but you'll nuke the Leonardo's bootloader. In the YDE, go to "file" and move the mouse to "upload using arduino as programmer" and have your fun. If you resort to this method, do not buy a Lilypad USB as it has the exact same 32U4 chip like a Leonardo and doesn't have the ICSP pins. That is, unless you CAN solder the pins into the 6 holes!

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