19

I have a class that accepts a generic type, and I want to override the equals method in a non-awkward way (i.e. something that looks clean and has minimal amount of code, but for a very general use case).

Right now I have something like this:

public class SingularNode<T> {
    private T value;

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object other){
        if(other instanceof SingularNode<?>){
            if(((SingularNode<T>)other).value.equals(value)){
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
}

Which, I'm guessing, is pretty flawed - I'm doing a cast to SingularNode<T> on the other object, which could potentially throw an error.

Another thing is - when I do if(other instanceof SingularNode<?>) I'm actually not checking exactly the right thing. I actually want to check against type T and not type ?. Whenever I try to make the ? into T, I get some error like:

Cannot perform instanceof check against parameterized type SingularNode<T>. Use the form SingularNode<?> instead, since further generic type information will be erased at runtime

How can I get around this? Is there some way to do T.class.isInstance(other); ?

I suppose there's one really ugly hack solution like this:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public boolean isEqualTo(Class<?> c, Object obj){
    if(c.isInstance(obj) && c.isInstance(this)){
        if(((SingularNode<T>)obj).value.equals(value)){
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

But that just looks really awkward with the extra method parameter, and it's also not a built-in function like equals is.

Any one who understand generics please explain this? I'm not that proficient with Java, as you can clearly see, so please explain with a tad bit more detail!

  • 2
    The error you have is because anyway the generic types are erased. I think the "T" should take care of the check of whether passed element is of the same class – Michal Borek May 5 '13 at 8:52
  • @MichalBorek mmm could you please elaborate a bit? i'm not fully grasping. So in another class, if i do: new SingularNode<Integer>(5).equals(new SingularNode<Character>('k')); do you happen to know where the check is happening? – David T. May 5 '13 at 9:14
  • I added answer to put a bunch of code. – Michal Borek May 5 '13 at 9:18
21

This version gives no warnings

public boolean equals(Object other){
    if (other instanceof SingularNode<?>){
        if ( ((SingularNode<?>)other).value.equals(value) ){
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

As for casting to SingularNode<T> it does not help anything, you cannot assume that T can be anything but Object.

Learn more about how generics are compiled in Java at

https://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/erasure.html

  • Thanks for the answer. Yes, that code will not give any warning because you are casting (SingularNode<?>)other up to type ? instead of T. however, i'd like to only use instances of type T in case that in the future I decide there's something special i wanted to do with type T. if that makes sense? – David T. May 5 '13 at 9:28
  • I dont think it makes sense since you cannot assume that T is anything but Object, cause it can be anything. Possibly it could be different in case of T extends Something – Evgeniy Dorofeev May 5 '13 at 9:34
  • ah okay. So then actually ? is pretty much the same as T here? – David T. May 5 '13 at 9:39
  • 1
    @newacct that was an error on my assumption. I had thought that in Java, bad stuff happens if the ? is not exactly T; and also later if i could do something with T, i dont want an error because i didn't type check – David T. May 5 '13 at 11:56
  • 2
    Sometimes you simply cannot avoid SuppressWarnings or using raw types. See JDK Collections.swap impl -> List l = list; in some cases even J.Bloch has to ignore generics and use raw types – Evgeniy Dorofeev May 5 '13 at 12:08
5

Evgeniy's solution and Michal's reasoning are correct - you don't need to worry about the type of T here. The reason is that the equals method doesn't depend on generics to work correctly. Instead, it is declared by Object and it takes an Object. Thus, it's responsible for checking the runtime type of whatever was passed in.

If this happens to be SingularNode<String> and you compare it with a SingularNode<Integer>, then ((SingularNode<?>)other).value.equals(value) is perfectly fine because calling Integer.equals with a String argument will correctly return false.

1

I put answer here to put code..

In your example you have (in pseudo code) Integer(5).equals(Char('k')) which is false, according to following equals implementation on java.lang.Integer:

public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (obj instanceof Integer) {
        return value == ((Integer)obj).intValue();
    }
    return false;
}

Going that way you don't have to worry about casting.

  • 1
    Oh okay, i see what you mean now. thank you. For some reason, I was under wrong the impression that Java throws an InvalidClassCast exception or something when you try to cast Character with an Integer. but it just returns false instead of erroring. i see it now – David T. May 5 '13 at 9:22
  • 1
    Usually the first think we check in equals method is class of the other object, and all Java equals implementations do it that way. – Michal Borek May 5 '13 at 9:23
  • 1
    So in the cast (SingularNode<T>)obj, what's actually happening is that it is casting obj to SingularNode, rather than T. which means that the obj.value is actually type T, right? – David T. May 5 '13 at 9:25
  • 2
    Yes. Precisely it is of type java.lang.Object, since after compilation generics are removed. Generics are needed only at compile time to check for type safety (this is called type erasure). So generics are not the same as templates in C++ – Michal Borek May 5 '13 at 9:26
0

I have the same problem, however it is more general. I have a class where I do have 3 generic types. I do not need to store any variable of those types because this class is used for transformation. However there are stored 'request' variables and I do use cache based on this class, so I need to implement equals() method that is based on those generics.

Do you know if there is any approach how to do it without reflection? Maybe internal variable of that type.. However it's null then.

public class TheClass<I, O, M> {

    private ClassA param1;
    private ClassB param2;
    private ClassC<M> param3;
    private BiFunction<ClassC<M>, I, Optional<O>> mapping;

    public ClassD<O, M> doSomething(ClassD<I, M> param) {
        ...
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if (this == o) {
            return true;
        }
        if (o == null) {
            return false;
        }
        if (getClass() != o.getClass()) {
            return false;
        }
        TheClass<?, ?, ?> that = (TheClass<?, ?, ?>) o;

        return Objects.equals(getParam1(), that.getParam1()) &&
                Objects.equals(getParam2(), that.getParam2()) &&
                Objects.equals(getParam3(), that.getParam3());
    }
}

For a better imagination... I have set of DAO objects getting data from database. On the other hand, we do have another set of API providers that provide similar data in different format (REST, internal systems..) We need a mapping function from one type to another. We use caching for better performance and the only man-in-the-middle is this class.

  • Should have posted it in a separate question. But it actually looks reasonable enough. getClass() != o.getClass() is equivalent to !(o instanceof TheClass<?,?,?>) or, with warnings, to !(o instanceof TheClass). – Paul Stelian Dec 30 '18 at 18:02
-4

You dont need to use any casting. Best equals to implementation I see like this

@Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if (this == o) return true;
        if (!(o instanceof VehicleModel)) return false;

        VehicleModel that = (VehicleModel) o;

        if (vehicleName != null ? !vehicleName.equals(that.vehicleName) : that.vehicleName != null)
            return false;

        return true;
    }

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