21

See this jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/8bENp/66/

If you look at the JavaScript console, you'll see something like this:

TypeError: Object NaN has no method 'replace'
    at makeHtml (https://raw.github.com/coreyti/showdown/master/compressed/showdown.js:62:705)
    at render (http://fiddle.jshell.net/_display/:50:42)
    at link (http://fiddle.jshell.net/_display/:54:13)
    at k (https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.0.1/angular.min.js:42:321)
    at e (https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.0.1/angular.min.js:38:198)
    at k (https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.0.1/angular.min.js:42:261)
    at e (https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.0.1/angular.min.js:38:198)
    at https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.0.1/angular.min.js:37:332
    at https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.0.1/angular.min.js:15:440
    at Object.e.$eval (https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.0.1/angular.min.js:85:416) <markdown ng-model="someCode" class="ng-pristine ng-valid"> angular.min.js:60

The problem is that model.$modelValue is NaN when its type shouldn't even be a number. Nevertheless, the markdown renders. I could add a typeof model.$modelValue == 'string' check, but I'd rather treat the underlying cause. Any idea?

4 Answers 4

30

I was not aware that $modelValue was initialized to NaN and ran into a similar issue. If the $modelValue is really needed at initialization, a solution may be to watch it until it has been assigned a new value:

.directive('contentEditor', function(){
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        require: 'ngModel',
        link: function($scope, $element, $attrs, ngModel){

            var unregister = $scope.$watch(function(){
                return ngModel.$modelValue;
            }, initialize);

            function initialize(value){
                ngModel.$setViewValue(value);
                unregister();
            }

            //...
        }
    };
});

The $watch returns a deregistration function, so it can be unregistered as soon as a new value has been assigned to $modelValue.

3
  • I didn't understand how did that work, but it worked. :) Oct 5, 2015 at 7:18
  • 1
    Very helpful and correct work with ngModelController
    – BILL
    Apr 8, 2016 at 14:56
  • When the return value of the first function changes, the second function runs. NaN is never equal to NaN (why it's default), so initialize always runs after the first model change.
    – Kevin Beal
    May 23, 2017 at 17:51
19

I think you can also wrap it in a ngModel.$render function.

Like so:

.directive('classOnValue', function($timeout) {
           return {
               restrict: 'A',
               require: 'ngModel',
               link: function(scope, element, attrs, ngModel) {

                   ngModel.$render = function(){
                       //Do something with your model
                       var actualValue = ngModel.$modelValue;
                   }

               }}
       })
2
  • Voting up this answer. For those want to interact with the model you can have the actual model value without errors. Mar 3, 2016 at 13:33
  • it fixed my issue as well!! Jul 20, 2016 at 6:09
13

The problem in your directive is that angular triggers the watch once before the expression has been evaluated. So the very first time the value is undefined. I don't believe that can be prevented, but is how AngularJS works.

I added a val parameter to your render function to show the actual watched value (logged to the console--see the fiddle at the bottom). The ngModelController initializes $modelValue to NaN, that's why NaN is passed to the function instead of undefined.

But since it seems as if the makeHtml function expects a string, an easy fix is to pass it an empty string if the value is falsy (might be even better to convert it to a string).

var htmlText = converter.makeHtml(model.$modelValue || '');

Updated fiddle.

2
  • Thanks Martin. Good to know this.
    – Steve
    May 5, 2013 at 13:19
  • Thank you very much. And have to say that it's very counter-intuitive behavior, I spent a hour in console where I saw value but my code - not.
    – OZ_
    Jul 31, 2013 at 22:12
4

Another variant (just if somebody will find that question here): just wrap execution of directive in $timeout function. As example, my directive which use it:

.directive('classOnValue', function($timeout) {
               return {
                   restrict: 'A',
                   require: 'ngModel',
                   link: function(scope, element, attrs, ngModel) {
                       $timeout(function() {
                           var value = (attrs.value || ngModel.$modelValue || ngModel.$viewValue );
                           if (value) {
                               element.addClass(attrs.classOnValue);
                           }
                       });
                   }}
           })
5
  • 1
    This fixed my issue :)
    – Kevin Beal
    Nov 13, 2013 at 22:09
  • Since ngModel is made facultative, errors may occur unless a check is made, such as : if (!ngModel) {return;}.
    – user2015707
    Aug 22, 2014 at 13:02
  • 1
    @timmy because timeout will be called in digest cycle of Angular.
    – OZ_
    Nov 28, 2014 at 0:25
  • Where in the digest cycle will the code be executed? I couldn't find any docs on this. How did someone even know how to perform this technique? Seems like magic if one doesn't understand the cycle and how to tap into it :)
    – timmy
    Nov 28, 2014 at 3:50
  • It's a good solution, better then using watches. Using timeouts is actually an ok, and angular-style.
    – Vladius
    Jul 16, 2015 at 15:08

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