68

I have a small issue I want to fix, but can't find any good answer :

When I use a scale on a div (which contains other divs), it leave white space around, from the "original" width and height of my div :

enter image description here

How can I remove the withe space around the div while scaled ?

I can use js if needed !

EDIT: Here is some code :

HTML

<div class="pull-right nextpack">

                    <div class="quarter scale-thumb">

                        <div class="up">
                            <div class="inner" style="background-image: url({{URL::base().'/galery/th293x711/'.$nextpack->src}})"></div>
                        </div>

                        <div class="face">
                            <div class="top" style="background-image: url({{URL::base().'/galery/th293x711/'.$nextpack->src}})"></div>
                            <div class="bot" style="background-image: url({{URL::base().'/galery/th293x711/'.$nextpack->src}})"></div>
                        </div>

                        <div class="cote-droit">
                            <div class="inner">
                                <div class="cote-droit-top" style="background-image: url({{URL::base().'/galery/th293x711/'.$nextpack->src}})"></div>
                                <div class="cote-droit-bot" style="background-image: url({{URL::base().'/galery/th293x711/'.$nextpack->src}})"></div>
                            </div>
                        </div>

                    </div>


                </div>

CSS (you really don't need to know how the pack is done, it's a lot of css3 for nothing, basically just skew, rotate, scale to make a 3D render from a flat template)

.quarter.scale-thumb
{
-webkit-transform: scale(0.2);
-moz-transform: scale(0.2);
-o-transform: scale(0.2);
transform: scale(0.2);
}

PS : The first pic is when I don't add the scale-thumb class

5
  • Show some relevant code. Question is impossible to answer from a screenshot. – Dirk McQuickly May 5 '13 at 15:05
  • 1
    Is this more clear? The code is no big deal, it's really the scale and the white space around it that keeps me stuck :) – Pretty Good Pancake May 5 '13 at 15:11
  • You could put it all inside another div which has overflow:hidden, then resize that div. – Dave May 5 '13 at 15:12
  • When I add this : .nextpack { overflow: hidden; display: block; -webkit-transform: scale(0.2); -moz-transform: scale(0.2); -o-transform: scale(0.2); transform: scale(0.2); } I still have white space around... – Pretty Good Pancake May 5 '13 at 15:21
  • 1
    Adjust the transform-origin property, which centers a scaled box vertically and horizontally, by default. stackoverflow.com/q/43020800/3597276 – Michael Benjamin Jun 14 '17 at 17:04
34

solution is to wrap the element inside a container, and resize it too while the scale() is done

Jsfiddle demo: http://jsfiddle.net/2KxSJ/

relevant code is:

#wrap
{
    background:yellow;
    height:66px;
    width:55px;
    padding:10px;
    float:left;
    -webkit-transition:0.5s all;
    -moz-transition:0.5s all;
    /* more transition here */
}

#wrap:hover
{
    height:300px;
    width:260px;
}

.quarter
{
    padding:20px;
    -webkit-transform: scale(0.2);
    -moz-transform: scale(0.2);
    -o-transform: scale(0.2);
    transform: scale(0.2);
    background:red;
    width:250px;
    -webkit-transform-origin:left top;
    -webkit-transition:0.5s all;
    -moz-transition:0.5s all;
    /* more transition here */
}


#wrap:hover .quarter
{
    -webkit-transform: scale(0.9);
    -moz-transform: scale(0.9);
    -o-transform: scale(0.9);
    transform: scale(0.9);
    -webkit-transform-origin:left top;
    -moz-transform-origin:left top;
    /* more transform-origin */
}
1
38

how transform works is:

  1. your element gets rendered
  2. your element gets transformed (moved, rotated, scaled)
  3. other elements stay where they got rendered - around the "original element"

so the white space is really just the way the element was rendered in the first place.

You should use width and height in CSS if you want to render the size of elements differently and have the surrounding elements respond to it.

Or you could use something like javascript to resize things.

1
  • 5
    Well, I can't do it with width and height because the elements I want to resize are not in percentage, and it's really complicated to make it so. How would you do it in js ? – Pretty Good Pancake May 5 '13 at 15:54
5

I encountered this problem and I solved it in this way, I used SCSS in order to don't repeat the same numbers along the code. The below code just moves the element right as the zoom decreases, in order to re-align it.

$originalWidth: 100px;
$rate: 0.5;

parent {
  width: $originalWidth;
}

parent > div {
  transform: scale(1);
}

parent:hover {
  width: $originalWidth*$rate;
}

parent:hover > div {
  transform: translateX(($originalWidth * ($rate - 1))/2) scale($rate); /* the order matters*/
}

You can get rid of SCSS just using CSS variables and calc(), if you prefer.

2
  • I think the community benefits from reading an explanation as to why that worked, even if it is a small explanation. Not just "Here's my code". – Juan Hurtado Aug 15 '18 at 16:09
  • 1
    I think it's self-explanatory, it just pushes the element right as the zoom decreases. I'll add some comment though – Cristian Traìna Aug 15 '18 at 16:11
5

I resolved my problem like yours that way.

I have a main container and I want decrease it

my css: .grid-container.full { transform: scale(0.6); transform-origin: top center; }

but my container had the bigger margin bottom. then I do it:

$mainGrid = $('.grid-container.full') $mainGrid.css('height', $mainGrid.height() * .6);

1
  • 1
    the transform-origin: top center option was the thing I was missing - my parent container was huge, and it decided to transform from the bottom up - so it created a ton of "white space". – Brian Powell Jul 3 '19 at 20:03
2

Another idea for white spaces when you transform objects

<div class="outer">
    <div class="inner">
        transformme
    </div>
</div>

css

.outer { overflow:hidden }
.inner {
    transform-origin:left top;
}

js

var rate = 0.5;
var outerheight = $('.inner').outerHeight()*rate;
$('.inner').css({ transform: "scale("+rate+")" });
$('.outer').css({ height: outerheight });

Also you can add other browser tags; -webkit-transform, -moz-transform, -o-transform

0

Solved the issue with margin-bottom (it will be negative in case of scaling down):

#container {
  display: inline-block;
  border: 3px solid blue;
}

#content {
  --scale: 0.5;

  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  background: lightgreen;
  transform: scale(var(--scale));
  transform-origin: top left;
  margin-bottom: calc((var(--scale) - 1) * 100%);
}
<div id="container">
  <div id="content"></div>
</div>

0

try multiplying both width and height of image using decimal numbers. Like this -> (I used SCSS)

img{
 width : 100px * 0.5;  // width reduced to half
 height : 100px * 0.5; // height reduced to half
}

I hope this helps in 2021 !

1
  • This will only cause an error in the CSS for the element it won't without using the calc function – a.mola Mar 16 at 2:10
-2

I solved this with by adding an 'outline: 1px solid transparent' to the element where the scale is applied on.

#wrap:hover .quarter
{
   -webkit-transform: scale(0.9);
   -moz-transform: scale(0.9);
   -o-transform: scale(0.9);
   transform: scale(0.9);
   -webkit-transform-origin:left top;
   -moz-transform-origin:left top;

   outline: 1px solid transparent;
}
4
  • I have no idea why, but this actually works amazingly in all browsers! How did you get to this? – italo.nascimento Sep 26 '17 at 14:17
  • Doesn't work, and if it did, it would be nice to know why. – The Onin Jan 4 '18 at 0:53
  • I removed the outline:1px solid transparent and it still works for me. All I needed was the origin statements. Beforehand the -transform was scaling all the whitespace and centering the shrunken image so this answer helped me – weekapaug Apr 29 '18 at 18:07
  • This works, just tested and works in JavaScript also - just set the element style: .transformOrigin='left top'; .. after this just re-size the element's parent/wrapper by using .getBoundingClientRect().width .. (or height) respectively. – user4244405 Oct 17 '18 at 14:05

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