73

I want to evaluate a string with a switch but when I read the string entered by the user throws me the following error.

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

    int main() {
        string a;
        cin>>a;
        switch (string(a)) {
        case "Option 1":
            cout<<"It pressed number 1"<<endl;
            break;
        case "Option 2":
            cout<<"It pressed number 2"<<endl;
            break;
        case "Option 3":
            cout<<"It pressed number 3"<<endl;
            break;
        default:
            cout<<"She put no choice"<<endl;
            break;
        }
        return 0;
    }

error: invalid cast from type 'std::string {aka std::basic_string}' to type 'int

9
  • 2
    std::string doesn't work with switch well.
    – David G
    May 5, 2013 at 19:56
  • Switch expressions must evaluate to an integral type. May 5, 2013 at 19:57
  • hash the string if you really want. Some hashing algorithm. Or could you just get the option number, i.e., 1, 2, 3, ...? May 5, 2013 at 19:58
  • if (a >= "Option 1" && a <= "Option 3") {std::cout << "It pressed number " + std::string(a.rbegin(), a.rbegin() + 1) << '\n';} else {std::cout << "She put no choice\n";}
    – chris
    May 5, 2013 at 19:59
  • 1
    @antitrust: No, again, try/catch won't protect from UB. You need to test the length with an if before accessing the character. Or were you thinking of the bounds-checked at() method rather than the unchecked operator[]()?
    – syam
    May 5, 2013 at 20:14

7 Answers 7

93

As said before, switch can be used only with integer values. So, you just need to convert your "case" values to integer. You can achieve it by using constexpr from c++11, thus some calls of constexpr functions can be calculated in compile time.

something like that...

switch (str2int(s))
{
  case str2int("Value1"):
    break;
  case str2int("Value2"):
    break;
}

where str2int is like (implementation from here):

constexpr unsigned int str2int(const char* str, int h = 0)
{
    return !str[h] ? 5381 : (str2int(str, h+1) * 33) ^ str[h];
}

Another example, the next function can be calculated in compile time:

constexpr int factorial(int n)
{
    return n <= 1 ? 1 : (n * factorial(n-1));
}  

int f5{factorial(5)};
// Compiler will run factorial(5) 
// and f5 will be initialized by this value. 
// so programm instead of wasting time for running function, 
// just will put the precalculated constant to f5 
10
  • 2
    The compiler might do so, or might not. If you made f5 constexpr, it would have to. Oct 28, 2014 at 20:38
  • 22
    This is exactly the reason why i hate working with c++. It violates the principle of least surprise in so many ways. This is one of them.
    – Richard
    Apr 12, 2015 at 17:06
  • 21
    Be careful using only the hash to test for string equality. For example, with this str2int() function, str2int("WS") == str2int("tP") and str2int("5g") == str2int("sa"). See dmytry.blogspot.com/2009/11/horrible-hashes.html As unlikely as a hash collision among the strings you're actually comparing might be, in my opinion it's better to use a lookup table that converts strings to an enum (as suggested by in mskfisher's answer). Mar 24, 2016 at 23:38
  • 1
    str2int(s) should be str2int(s.c_str()) if s is a std::string. A good solution would be to make another str2int function that accept std::strings but isn't constexpr
    – Winter
    Jan 18, 2017 at 14:14
  • 1
    @schlebe Yes I see, Honestly I cannot say which Hash function is better, the purpose of this answer was to show how to use constexpr for the question. In any case compiler will emit an error if this hash function gives the same result for different strings in switch block.
    – Serhiy
    Feb 13, 2019 at 8:52
34

You can map the strings to enum values, then switch on the enum:

enum Options {
    Option_Invalid,
    Option1,
    Option2,
    //others...
};

Options resolveOption(string input);

//  ...later...

switch( resolveOption(input) )
{
    case Option1: {
        //...
        break;
    }
    case Option2: {
        //...
        break;
    }
    // handles Option_Invalid and any other missing/unmapped cases
    default: {
        //...
        break;
    }
}

Resolving the enum can be implemented as a series of if checks:

 Options resolveOption(std::string input) {
    if( input == "option1" ) return Option1;
    if( input == "option2" ) return Option2;
    //...
    return Option_Invalid;
 }

Or a map lookup:

 Options resolveOption(std::string input) {
    static const std::map<std::string, Option> optionStrings {
        { "option1", Option1 },
        { "option2", Option2 },
        //...
    };

    auto itr = optionStrings.find(input);
    if( itr != optionStrings.end() ) {
        return itr->second;
    }
    return Option_Invalid; 
}
7
  • Is resolveOption another function or is that something in the standard library?
    – Rob Rose
    Oct 12, 2016 at 2:02
  • resolveOption is the custom function that calculates the value of the enumerator Options based on the current program input,
    – LastBlow
    Nov 29, 2017 at 7:22
  • For clarity, I've added two possible implementations of a resolveOption() function.
    – mskfisher
    Feb 8, 2018 at 20:07
  • 2
    Finally, with this solution, it seems really faster to replace the switch by a if/else statement. In fact, you do that in the first version of the function resolveOption.
    – user6547518
    Jun 19, 2020 at 14:12
  • 1
    Thanks, @coincoin - fixed.
    – mskfisher
    Oct 19, 2021 at 15:17
19

A switch statement can only be used for integral values, not for values of user-defined type. (And even if it could, your input operation doesn't work, either. The >> operation extracts single tokens, separated by whitespace, so it can never retrieve a value "Option 1".)

You might want this:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>


std::string input;

if (!std::getline(std::cin, input)) { /* error, abort! */ }

if (input == "Option 1")
{
    // ... 
}
else if (input == "Option 2")
{ 
   // ...
}

// etc.
0
15

You can only use switch-case on types castable to an int.

You could, however, define a std::map<std::string, std::function> dispatcher and use it like dispatcher[str]() to achieve same effect.

1
4

You can't. Full stop.

switch is only for integral types, if you want to branch depending on a string you need to use if/else.

3

what about just have the option number:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string s;
    int op;

    cin >> s >> op;
    switch (op) {
    case 1: break;
    case 2: break;
    default:
    }

    return 0;
}  
1

Switch value must have an Integral type. Also, since you know that differenciating character is in position 7, you could switch on a.at(7). But you are not sure the user entered 8 characters. He may as well have done some typing mistake. So you are to surround your switch statement within a Try Catch. Something with this flavour

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main() {
    string a;
    cin>>a;

    try
    {
    switch (a.at(7)) {
    case '1':
        cout<<"It pressed number 1"<<endl;
        break;
    case '2':
        cout<<"It pressed number 2"<<endl;
        break;
    case '3':
        cout<<"It pressed number 3"<<endl;
        break;
    default:
        cout<<"She put no choice"<<endl;
        break;
    }
    catch(...)
    {

    }
    }
    return 0;
}

The default clause in switch statement captures cases when users input is at least 8 characters, but not in {1,2,3}.

Alternatively, you can switch on values in an enum.

EDIT

Fetching 7th character with operator[]() does not perform bounds check, so that behavior would be undefined. we use at() from std::string, which is bounds-checked, as explained here.

0

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