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I need a function that will take a char pointer like char *s = "abc def gf ijklmn". If it is passed through the function int space_remove(char *) it should return the number of extra spaces and modify the string and take out the extra spaces.

int space_remove(char *s)
{
    int i = 0, ic = 1, r = 0,space = 0;
    //char *sp = (char *) malloc(strlen(s) * sizeof(char));
    char sp[256];
    while (*(s+i) != '\0'){
        if (*(s+i) == ' ' && *(s+i+1) == ' '){
            space = 1;
            r++;
        }
        if (space){
            sp[i] = *(s+i+r);
            i++;
        }

        else if (!space){
            sp[i] = *(s+i+r);
            i++;

        }
        else {
            sp[i] = *(s+i+r);
            i++;
        }
    }
    sp[i+1] = '\0';
    printf("sp:%s \n",sp);
    s = sp;
    //free(sp);
    return r;
}

any help here?

if the the string is "abc (10 spaces) def (20 spaces) hijk" it should return "abc(1 space) def (1 space) hijk"

  • OT: As always i < i+r all sp can be replaced by s. Which allows to parse strings longer then 255 characters. – alk May 6 '13 at 5:58
  • OT^2: On behalf of readabiltiy just decide whether to use *(s+x) or s[x] notation to addess an array's element. It's up to you which one, but just do not mix both. – alk May 6 '13 at 6:02
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There are 2 issues

  1. Reset space to 0 in while loop.

  2. Do not return sp in as it is local char array. You can copy string in s instead.

    strcpy(s, sp);

instead of

s = sp;

strcpy would be safe as length of sp should be at max length of s when there is nothing to trim.

  • i reset space to 0 and i did strcpy but it does not take away extra spaces – user2234820 May 6 '13 at 19:56
  • @KeyMaker, I think you need to relook at your logic. Your code halves the spaces. Generally, the logic is if you find space, skip more spaces (do not put them in sp. – Rohan May 7 '13 at 5:16
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Here is the working code:

    #include<stdio.h>
int space_remove(char *s)
{
    char *s1=s;
    int count=0;
    while(*s){
        *s1++=*s++; // copy first even if space, since we need the 1st space
        if(*(s-1) == ' '){ //if what we just copied is a space
            while(*s ==' '){
                count++;
                s++; // ignore the additional spaces
            }
        }
    }
    *s1='\0'; //terminate
    return count;
}

void main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    //char *str="hi     how r     u";
    int count=space_remove(argv[1]);
    printf("%d %s",count,argv[1]);
}

The modified answer:

#include<stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
int space_remove(char *s)
{
    char *s1=malloc(strlen(s)*sizeof(char));
    char *s2=s1; // for printing
    int count=0;
    while(*s){
        *s1++=*s++; // copy first even if space, since we need the 1st space
        if(*(s-1) == ' '){ //if what we just copied is a space
            while(*s ==' '){
                count++;
                s++; // ignore the additional spaces
            }
        }
    }
    *s1='\0'; //terminate
    printf("%s",s2);
    return count;
}

void main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    char *str="hi     how r     u";
    int count=space_remove(str);
    printf("\n%d",count);
}
  • You should put the s1++ and s++ after the if statement, to make the code easier to read. – Lundin May 6 '13 at 6:36
  • i tried it and it didn't work for and I am suppose to return how many extra spaces and it seg faults at this line - *s1++=*s++; – user2234820 May 6 '13 at 15:23
  • It works just fine in my computer (i have tried in two, a mac and a windows). I have added the whole code. What it the input for which it is giving the segmentation fault? What compiler are you using? – faisal May 6 '13 at 17:11
  • I am compiling on a linux machine using gccx i just used gcc and it still gave me a seg fault. – user2234820 May 6 '13 at 17:49
  • I found the problem. If you compile with the new edit it works on linux machine. run with ./a.out "adasd asdas " The problem is when you assign a string to a char * it converts it to const char *. I am trying to find out how to fix it. – faisal May 6 '13 at 18:12

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