21

I want to fork multiple processes and then use a semaphore on them. Here is what I tried:

sem_init(&sem, 1, 1);   /* semaphore*, pshared, value */
.
.
.
if(pid != 0){ /* parent process */
    wait(NULL); /* wait all child processes */

    printf("\nParent: All children have exited.\n");
    .
    .
    /* cleanup semaphores */
    sem_destroy(&sem);      
    exit(0);
}
else{ /* child process */
    sem_wait(&sem);     /* P operation */
    printf("  Child(%d) is in critical section.\n",i);
    sleep(1);
    *p += i%3;  /* increment *p by 0, 1 or 2 based on i */
    printf("  Child(%d) new value of *p=%d.\n",i,*p);
    sem_post(&sem);     /* V operation */
    exit(0);
}

And the output is:

child(0) forked
child(1) forked
  Child(0) is in critical section.
  Child(1) is in critical section.
child(2) forked
  Child(2) is in critical section.
child(3) forked
  Child(3) is in critical section.
child(4) forked
  Child(4) is in critical section.
  Child(0) new value of *p=0.
  Child(1) new value of *p=1.
  Child(2) new value of *p=3.
  Child(3) new value of *p=3.

  Child(4) new value of *p=4.
Parent: All children have exited.

This clearly means the semaphore didn't work as it was supposed to. Can you explain how I should use semaphores on forked processes?

59

The problem you are facing is the misunderstanding of sem_init() function. When you read the manual page you will see this:

The pshared argument indicates whether this semaphore is to be shared between the threads of a process, or between processes.

If you are done reading up to this point, you will think that the non-zero value of pshared will make the semaphore inter-process semaphore. However, this is wrong. You should continue reading and you'll understand that you have to locate the semaphore in a shared memory region. To do that, several functions can be used as you can see below:

If pshared is nonzero, then the semaphore is shared between processes, and should be located in a region of shared memory (see shm_open(3), mmap(2), and shmget(2)). (Since a child created by fork(2) inherits its parent's memory mappings, it can also access the semaphore.) Any process that can access the shared memory region can operate on the semaphore using sem_post(3), sem_wait(3), etc.

I find this approach as a more complicated approach than others, therefore I want to encourage people to use sem_open() instead of sem_init().

Below you can see a complete program illustrates the following:

  • How to allocate shared memory and use shared variables between forked processes.
  • How to initialize a semaphore in a shared memory region and is used by multiple processes.
  • How to fork multiple processes and make the parent wait until all of its children exit.
#include <stdio.h>          /* printf()                 */
#include <stdlib.h>         /* exit(), malloc(), free() */
#include <sys/types.h>      /* key_t, sem_t, pid_t      */
#include <sys/shm.h>        /* shmat(), IPC_RMID        */
#include <errno.h>          /* errno, ECHILD            */
#include <semaphore.h>      /* sem_open(), sem_destroy(), sem_wait().. */
#include <fcntl.h>          /* O_CREAT, O_EXEC          */


int main (int argc, char **argv){
    int i;                        /*      loop variables          */
    key_t shmkey;                 /*      shared memory key       */
    int shmid;                    /*      shared memory id        */
    sem_t *sem;                   /*      synch semaphore         *//*shared */
    pid_t pid;                    /*      fork pid                */
    int *p;                       /*      shared variable         *//*shared */
    unsigned int n;               /*      fork count              */
    unsigned int value;           /*      semaphore value         */

    /* initialize a shared variable in shared memory */
    shmkey = ftok ("/dev/null", 5);       /* valid directory name and a number */
    printf ("shmkey for p = %d\n", shmkey);
    shmid = shmget (shmkey, sizeof (int), 0644 | IPC_CREAT);
    if (shmid < 0){                           /* shared memory error check */
        perror ("shmget\n");
        exit (1);
    }

    p = (int *) shmat (shmid, NULL, 0);   /* attach p to shared memory */
    *p = 0;
    printf ("p=%d is allocated in shared memory.\n\n", *p);

    /********************************************************/

    printf ("How many children do you want to fork?\n");
    printf ("Fork count: ");
    scanf ("%u", &n);

    printf ("What do you want the semaphore value to be?\n");
    printf ("Semaphore value: ");
    scanf ("%u", &value);

    /* initialize semaphores for shared processes */
    sem = sem_open ("pSem", O_CREAT | O_EXCL, 0644, value); 
    /* name of semaphore is "pSem", semaphore is reached using this name */

    printf ("semaphores initialized.\n\n");


    /* fork child processes */
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++){
        pid = fork ();
        if (pid < 0) {
        /* check for error      */
            sem_unlink ("pSem");   
            sem_close(sem);  
            /* unlink prevents the semaphore existing forever */
            /* if a crash occurs during the execution         */
            printf ("Fork error.\n");
        }
        else if (pid == 0)
            break;                  /* child processes */
    }


    /******************************************************/
    /******************   PARENT PROCESS   ****************/
    /******************************************************/
    if (pid != 0){
        /* wait for all children to exit */
        while (pid = waitpid (-1, NULL, 0)){
            if (errno == ECHILD)
                break;
        }

        printf ("\nParent: All children have exited.\n");

        /* shared memory detach */
        shmdt (p);
        shmctl (shmid, IPC_RMID, 0);

        /* cleanup semaphores */
        sem_unlink ("pSem");   
        sem_close(sem);  
        /* unlink prevents the semaphore existing forever */
        /* if a crash occurs during the execution         */
        exit (0);
    }

    /******************************************************/
    /******************   CHILD PROCESS   *****************/
    /******************************************************/
    else{
        sem_wait (sem);           /* P operation */
        printf ("  Child(%d) is in critical section.\n", i);
        sleep (1);
        *p += i % 3;              /* increment *p by 0, 1 or 2 based on i */
        printf ("  Child(%d) new value of *p=%d.\n", i, *p);
        sem_post (sem);           /* V operation */
        exit (0);
    }
}

OUTPUT

./a.out 
shmkey for p = 84214791
p=0 is allocated in shared memory.

How many children do you want to fork?
Fork count: 6 
What do you want the semaphore value to be?
Semaphore value: 2
semaphores initialized.

  Child(0) is in critical section.
  Child(1) is in critical section.
  Child(0) new value of *p=0.
  Child(1) new value of *p=1.
  Child(2) is in critical section.
  Child(3) is in critical section.
  Child(2) new value of *p=3.
  Child(3) new value of *p=3.
  Child(4) is in critical section.
  Child(5) is in critical section.
  Child(4) new value of *p=4.
  Child(5) new value of *p=6.

Parent: All children have exited.

It is not bad to check shmkey since when ftok() fails, it returns -1. However if you have multiple shared variables and if the ftok() function fails multiple times, the shared variables that have a shmkey with value -1 will reside in the same region of the shared memory resulting in a change in one affecting the other. Therefore the program execution will get messy. To avoid this, it is better checked if the ftok() returns -1 or not (better to check in source code rather than printing to screen like I did, although I wanted to show you the key values in case there is a collision).

Pay attention to how the semaphore is declared and initialized. It's different than what you have done in the question (sem_t sem vs sem_t* sem). Moreover, you should use them as they appear in this example. You cannot define sem_t* and use it in sem_init().

  • 1
    The problem is that some man pages are not so explicit. Look at SUSv2 (for example) : If the pshared argument has a non-zero value, then the semaphore is shared between processes; in this case, any process that can access the semaphore sem can use sem for performing sem_wait(), sem_trywait(), sem_post(), and sem_destroy() operations. It is much harder to understand that one should use shared memory! – Jean-Baptiste Yunès Jun 26 '13 at 15:33
  • unfortunately.. It took me 2 homeworks to figure out:) This is what Linux lacks in my opinion: they assume people already know things as if they are a part of the developer community. Again, in my opinion, it should be explanatory, unlike those manuals. – Varaquilex Jun 26 '13 at 17:51
  • I think you should detach the shared memory from the child processes as well, as After a fork(2) the child inherits the attached shared memory segments (man shmdt). – Chris Dec 2 '13 at 11:42
  • I was struggling to figure this out as well. This post really held. +1 to the question and answers. – RootPhoenix May 2 '14 at 17:48
  • @GNA I know the struggle, I though people might use such an example:) Thank you for +1s. Hope it helped. – Varaquilex May 2 '14 at 23:50
1

Linux minimal anonymous sem_init + mmap MAP_ANONYMOUS example

I like this setup as it does not pollute any global namespace as sem_open does.

The only downside is that MAP_ANONYMOUS is not POSIX, and I don't know any replacement: Anonymous shared memory? shm_open for example takes a global identifier just like sem_open.

main.c:

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <assert.h>
#include <semaphore.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    pid_t pid;
    typedef struct {
        sem_t sem;
        int i;
    } Semint;

    Semint *semint;
    size_t size = sizeof(Semint);
    semint = (Semint *)mmap(NULL, size, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_ANONYMOUS | MAP_SHARED, 0, 0);
    assert(semint != MAP_FAILED);
    /* 1: shared across processes
     * 0: initial value, wait locked until one post happens (making it > 0)
     */
    sem_init(&semint->sem, 1, 0);
    semint->i = 0;
    pid = fork();
    assert(pid != -1);
    if (pid == 0) {
        sleep(1);
        semint->i = 1;
        msync(&semint->sem, size, MS_SYNC);
        sem_post(&semint->sem);
        exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
    }
    if (argc == 1) {
        sem_wait(&semint->sem);
    }
    /* Was modified on the other process. */
    assert(semint->i == 1);
    wait(NULL);
    sem_destroy(&semint->sem);
    assert(munmap(semint, size) != -1);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Compile:

gcc -g -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -o main main.c -lpthread

Run with sem_wait:

./main

Run without sem_wait:

./main 1

Without this synchronization, the assert is very likely to fail, since the child sleeps for one whole second:

main: main.c:39: main: Assertion `semint->i == 1' failed.

Tested on Ubuntu 18.04. GitHub upstream.

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