78

Is there a standard way of using exception chains in Python? Like the Java exception 'caused by'?

Here is some background.

I have a module with one main exception class DSError:

 class DSError(Exception):
     pass

Somewhere within this module there will be:

try:
    v = my_dict[k]
    something(v)
except KeyError as e:
    raise DSError("no key %s found for %s" % (k, self))
except ValueError as e:
    raise DSError("Bad Value %s found for %s" % (v, self))
except DSError as e:
    raise DSError("%s raised in %s" % (e, self))

Basically this snippet should throw only DSError and tell me what happened and why. The thing is that the try block might throw lots of other exceptions, so I'd prefer if I can do something like:

try:
    v = my_dict[k]
    something(v)
except Exception as e:
    raise DSError(self, v, e)  # Exception chained...

Is this standard pythonic way? I did not see exception chains in other modules so how is that done in Python?

  • 3
    Woah, Thanks @jamylak! You fixed my quotes before I even saw them :-) – Ayman May 7 '13 at 8:44
  • Yes and I had to add a redundant word because SO didn't let me make those small changes :( – jamylak May 7 '13 at 8:46
  • What do you want the output to be? I can't tell if you actually want the original exception's stack trace, or if you want to hide it and just have your own exception with a single message that summarizes the original exception? – BrenBarn May 7 '13 at 8:49
  • The original trace would be much better, since the try block may be called recursively from the module. – Ayman May 7 '13 at 8:56
118

Exception chaining is only available in Python 3, where you can write:

try:
    v = {}['a']
except KeyError as e:
    raise ValueError('failed') from e

which yields an output like

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "t.py", line 2, in <module>
    v = {}['a']
KeyError: 'a'

The above exception was the direct cause of the following exception:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "t.py", line 4, in <module>
    raise ValueError('failed') from e
ValueError: failed

In most cases, you don't even need the from; Python 3 will by default show all exceptions that occured during exception handling, like this:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "t.py", line 2, in <module>
    v = {}['a']
KeyError: 'a'

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "t.py", line 4, in <module>
    raise ValueError('failed')
ValueError: failed

What you can do in Python 2 is adding custom attributes to your exception class, like:

class MyError(Exception):
    def __init__(self, message, cause):
        super(MyError, self).__init__(message + u', caused by ' + repr(cause))
        self.cause = cause

try:
    v = {}['a']
except KeyError as e:
    raise MyError('failed', e)
  • 2
    For python 2 if one wants to save the traceback - which one must want - raise MyError(message + u', caused by ' + repr(cause)), None, sys.exc_info()[2] – Mr_and_Mrs_D May 29 '15 at 23:39
  • 1
    "In most cases, you don't even need the from" Do you have an example where it is needed or useful? – timgeb Jan 12 '16 at 22:46
  • 3
    @timgeb PEP 3134 has two situations for chaining: one where error handling code results in another exception being raised, and the other where an exception was deliberately translated to a different exception. The from e is for the deliberate case, and changes the message in the output as shown in the answer above. – Eric Smith Jan 19 '17 at 17:14
  • 2
    This response is, in my opinion, better than the duplicated question's selected answer, as this covers Python 3. Also, kudos for noting that the from isn't even necessary, as Python 3 tracebacks already print all current exceptions in the stack. – Alvaro Gutierrez Perez Oct 31 '17 at 2:21
  • upvoted! what would you do if you also want to return a value from this – PirateApp Jul 14 '18 at 13:24
5

Is this what you're asking for?

class MyError(Exception):
    def __init__(self, other):
        super(MyError, self).__init__(other.message)

>>> try:
...     1/0
... except Exception, e:
...     raise MyError(e)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#27>", line 4, in <module>
    raise MyError(e)
MyError: division by zero

If you want to store the original exception object, you can certainly do so in your own exception class's __init__. You might actually want to store the traceback as the exception object itself doesn't provide much useful information about where the exception occurred:

class MyError(Exception):
    def __init__(self, other):
        self.traceback = sys.exc_info()
        super(MyError, self).__init__(other.message)

After this you can access the traceback attribute of your exception to get info about the original exception. (Python 3 already provides this as the __traceback__ attribute of an exception object.)

  • Almost right, but I considered this would be 'cheating', since it only takes the message of the chained exception, not the actual exception object. I.e. I would not know where the actual division by zero occurred, just that it was caught somewhere. – Ayman May 7 '13 at 8:53
  • @Ayman: See my edited answer. All you have to do is grab the traceback and store it. However, if you really want all the information from the original exception to show up in the traceback like a real exception, then phihag is right that this can't be accomplished in Python 2. You'd have to just manually print the old traceback as part of your exception's message. – BrenBarn May 7 '13 at 9:00
  • Thanks. I didn't know about the sys.exc_info(). I would accept this as the answer too :-) – Ayman May 7 '13 at 9:07
  • is other.message always present ? – Mr_and_Mrs_D Jan 21 '15 at 19:10

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