5

Is it possible to stop a form from submitting and then resubmitting the same form from within the success of an ajax call?

At the moment it gets to the success bit but it doesn't resubmit the form which should submit and redirect the user to the http://example.com website.

Thank you very much for any help in advance

If it's not possible to do it this way, is there another way of getting it to work?

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('form').submit(function(e) {
        e.preventDefault();

        $.ajax({
            url: $('form').attr('action'),
            type: 'post',
            data: $('form').serialize(),
            success: function(data) {
                if (data == 'true')
                {
                    $('form').attr('action', 'http://example.com');
                    $('form').unbind('submit').submit(); // mistake: changed $(this) to $('form') - Problem still persists though it does not resubmit and redirect to http://example.com
                }
                else
                {
                    alert('Your username/password are incorrect');
                }
            },
            error: function() {
                alert('There has been an error, please alert us immediately');
            }
        });
    });
});

Edit:

Stackoverflow posts checked out for the code below:

I just thought I'd mention I have also tried this code without avail.

var ajaxSent = false;
$(document).ready(function() {
    $('form').submit(function(e) {

        if ( !ajaxSent)
            e.preventDefault();

        $.ajax({
            url: $('form').attr('action'),
            type: 'post',
            data: $('form').serialize(),
            success: function(data) {
                if (data == 'true')
                {
                    alert('submit form');
                    ajaxSent = true;
                    $('form').attr('action', 'http://example.com');
                    $('form').submit();
                    return true;
                }
                else
                {
                    alert('Your username/password are incorrect');
                    return false;
                }
            },
            error: function() {
                alert('There has been an error, please alert us immediately');
                return false;
            }
        });
    });
});

I have also tried this code without any luck as well.

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('form').submit(function(e) {
        e.preventDefault();

        $.ajax({
            url: $('form').attr('action'),
            type: 'post',
            data: $('form').serialize(),
            success: function(data) {
                if (data == 'true')
                {
                    $('form').attr('action', 'http://example.com');
                    $('form').unbind('submit').submit();
                    return true;
                }
                else
                {
                    alert('Your username/password are incorrect');
                    return false;
                }
            },
            error: function() {
                alert('There has been an error, please alert us immediately');
                return false;
            }
        });
    });
});
7
  • 1
    this will most probably submit form infinitely. At first ajax submits form, on success it again goes through same ajax and on success again .. then again.. then again. – SachinGutte May 7 '13 at 9:39
  • @SachinG Why? They're removing (well, attempting to remove) the submit event handler before submitting the form the second time. – Anthony Grist May 7 '13 at 9:40
  • @AnthonyGrist but after unbinding, same handler is getting called because submit is followed by it. Won't it? Or i'm wrong ? – SachinGutte May 7 '13 at 9:42
  • @SachinG You're wrong. When the event handler is unbound, it's gone - it can't then be called by anything. – Anthony Grist May 7 '13 at 9:46
  • 1
    You can post your own answer, but as an answer, not by editing your original question! – enb081 May 7 '13 at 11:06
14

Solution was quite simple and involved adding and setting async to false in .ajax(). In addition, I have re-worked the code to work of the submit button instead which submits the form when the AJAX passes successfully.

Here is my working code:

$(document).ready(function() {
    var testing = false;
    $('#btn-login').on('click', function() {
        $.ajax({
            url: $('form').attr('action'),
            type: 'post',
            data: $('form').serialize(),
            async: false,
            success: function(data) {
                if (data == 'true')
                {
                    testing = true;
                    $('form').attr('action', 'https://example.com');
                    $('form').submit();
                }
                else
                {
                    alert('Your username/password are incorrect');
                }
            },
            error: function() {
                alert('There has been an error, please alert us immediately');
            }
        });

        return testing;
    });
});
4
  • 1
    What happens when you hit enter on any inputs? It will submit which breaks this logic. – Ruben Arevalo Jan 5 '17 at 16:26
  • @RubenArevalo Disable the enter key until all fields are filled in? Why would you allow someone to submit the form if it doesn't have all the required data anyways? – adamj Jan 5 '17 at 23:05
  • async:false doesn't matter in this case. – Kevin B Jul 12 '18 at 15:23
  • @KevinB "Doesn't matter" in what way? – adamj Jul 14 '18 at 0:41
7

It's no good practice to reselect all form tags throughout your code, what if you have multiple forms on the page? Also you'd better use .on() and .off() with jQuery.

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('form').on('submit', function(e) {
        e.preventDefault();

        // cache the current form so you make sure to only have data from this one
        var form = this,
            $form = $(form);

        $.ajax({
            url: form.action,
            type: form.method,
            data: $form.serialize(),
            success: function(data) {
                if (data == 'true')
                {
                    $form.attr('action', 'http://example.com').off('submit').submit();
                }
                else
                {
                    alert('Your username/password are incorrect');
                }
            },
            error: function() {
                alert('There has been an error, please alert us immediately');
            }
        });
    });
});
2
  • I'll give the .on() a shot see if that helps it. Regards not using the form tag, you're right, but in this case there will always be only the single form on the page. If it were any other case I would have slapped an ID attribute on the form and targeted it on that. – adamj May 7 '13 at 10:08
  • Even if you add an ID I'd still cache the object, simply for performance and code consistency. – Simon May 7 '13 at 11:25
3

In one line you use $('form') to select the form to change its action, but then you use $(this) to try to select that same form. I would guess that this inside the callback function isn't what you expect it to be, and is something other than your form (possibly the window object).

Just chain the calls:

$('form').attr('action', 'http://example.com').unbind('submit').submit();
3
  • $(this) was actually supposed to be $('form'), this was a mistake which i had corrected in the code forgot to edit it in the stackoverflow post before i posted. Do'h. Regards the chaining, yea i know i can do it all in one go, I just prefer doing it separately for better overview – adamj May 7 '13 at 9:50
  • @adamj Honestly, the code looks correct to me with that change. You'll probably have to debug it, see what's being returned by the AJAX request, see what parts of the code are firing, etc. – Anthony Grist May 7 '13 at 9:53
  • AJAX is fine no problems there. When it runs the .submit() for the first time it hits the AJAX it gets back the data and hits the success. It should then .unbind() the form from the submit and resubmit the form but the resubmit never occurs. By default you would instantly know whether it worked by it submitting the form which would lead to example.com, but this doesn't happen. – adamj May 7 '13 at 10:04

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