14

I already have a database named "mydb", where I have a table called "AERODROME".

My models.py looks like this:

from django.db import models

class Aerodrome(models.Model):
    Name = models.CharField(max_length=48)
    Latitude = models.DecimalField(decimal_places=4, max_digits=7)
    Longitude = models.DecimalField(decimal_places=4, max_digits=7)

And I have this method at views.py:

from django.shortcuts import render
from helloworld.models import Aerodrome

def aerodromes(request):
    return render(request, 'aerodromes.html', {'aerodromes': Aerodrome.objects.all()})

At my templates folder, I have aerodromes.html, which is quite simple too:

<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
    </head>
    <body>
        <table>
        {% for aerodrome in aerodromes %}
            <tr>
                <td>{{ aerodrome.Name }}</td>
                <td>{{ aerodrome.Longitude }}</td>
                <td>{{ aerodrome.Latitude }}</td>
            </tr>
            {% endfor %}
        </table>
    </body>
</html>

When I test through my browser, I get an error, because it looks like it's accessing the table with a wrong name. My application is called "helloworld" since it's a test, and instead of accessing to mydb.AERODROMES, it is accessing to mydb.helloworld_aerodrome (Also note the case sensitive problem).

Since I already had the database populated, I haven't run syncdb (I understood it wasn't neccessary, but maybe this is the problem).

So, the problem is that I don't know why it is adding "helloworld_" to the table name, and also that I still don't know for sure where exactly am I fixing the table name (and from there comes the case sensitive problem having "aerodrome" and not "AERODROMES").

Any help here?

37

Use the Meta class (documentation here) inside your models.py model definition:

class Aerodrome(models.Model):
    Name = models.CharField(max_length=48)
    Latitude = models.DecimalField(decimal_places=4, max_digits=7)
    Longitude = models.DecimalField(decimal_places=4, max_digits=7)

    class Meta:
        db_table = 'AERODROMES'

This will override the default naming scheme for model tables in the SQL database.


You can also add the managed attribute to control whether or not python manage.py syncdb and python manage.py flush manage the table.

class Aerodrome(models.Model):
    # ...

    class Meta:
        db_table = 'AERODROMES'
        managed = False

With this you can syncdb without fear of wiping your data.

2
  • 1
    Does managed imply only that the table was externaly populated, or would it also imply that it is not possible to write into that table from the application? – Roman Rdgz May 7 '13 at 14:42
  • 2
    Invoking Aerodrome.save() will work as expected provided the database table actually jives with the model definition (e.g. has the correct schema to match your Name, Latitude, and Longitude). From the documentation: "If False, no database table creation or deletion operations will be performed for this model. ... This is the only difference when managed=False. All other aspects of model handling are exactly the same as normal." – pztrick May 7 '13 at 14:49
3

from the django docs: It is strongly advised that you use lowercase table names when you override the table name via db_table, particularly if you are using the MySQL backend. See the MySQL notes for more details.

https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.11/ref/databases/#table-names

1

Specifying table name for your model explicitly should help:

from django.db import models

class Aerodrome(models.Model):
    Name = models.CharField(max_length=48)
    Latitude = models.DecimalField(decimal_places=4, max_digits=7)
    Longitude = models.DecimalField(decimal_places=4, max_digits=7)

    class Meta:
        db_table = 'AERODROMES'
1

You can set the db table name in models Meta class. as

class Aerodrome(models.Model):
    Name = models.CharField(max_length=48)
    Latitude = models.DecimalField(decimal_places=4, max_digits=7)
    Longitude = models.DecimalField(decimal_places=4, max_digits=7)

    class Meta:
        db_table="AERODROMES"

If you are prepopulating table externally. take care the data is appropriate/compatible in each record/field.

However, you have to syncdb as other tables required for django are created.

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