59

I know there has been many questions about checking for localStorage but what if someone manually shuts it off in their browser? Here's the code I'm using to check:

localStorage.setItem('mod', 'mod');
if (localStorage.getItem('mod') != null){
    alert ("yes");
    localStorage.removeItem('mod');
}else{
    alert ("no");
}

Simple function and it works. But if I go into my Chrome settings and choose the option "Don't Save Data" (I don't remember exactly what it's called), when I try to run this function I get nothing but Uncaught Error: SecurityError: DOM Exception 18. So is there a way to check if the person has it turned off completely?

UPDATE: This is the second function I tried and I still get no response (alert).

try {
 localStorage.setItem("name", "Hello World!");
} catch (e) {
 if (e == QUOTA_EXCEEDED_ERR) {
     alert('Quota exceeded!');
}
}
105

Use modernizr's approach (you might want to change my function name to something better):

function lsTest(){
    var test = 'test';
    try {
        localStorage.setItem(test, test);
        localStorage.removeItem(test);
        return true;
    } catch(e) {
        return false;
    }
}

if(lsTest() === true){
    // available
}else{
    // unavailable
}

It's not as concise as other methods but that's because it's designed to maximise compatibility.

The original source: https://github.com/Modernizr/Modernizr/blob/master/feature-detects/storage/localstorage.js

Working example: http://jsfiddle.net/6sm54/2/

  • 1
    Hey Joe, I get this error when running your function (LS turned on or off) "Uncaught SyntaxError: Illegal return statement" – user2025469 May 7 '13 at 20:18
  • 1
    @user2025469 This code was intended to be used as a function. – Kiruse May 7 '13 at 20:19
  • 1
    Sorry, I should have mentioned that. I've updated my answer and added a demo so you can see it works properly. – Joe May 7 '13 at 20:27
  • 1
    Joe, that's exactly what I've been looking for. When I turn of LS, it alerts unavailable. Is this just a basic javascript function or do I need to include the modernizr JS in my script> – user2025469 May 7 '13 at 20:30
  • 7
    BEWARE! This Modernizr approach will return false if the localStorage quota is reached. If you have functions dealing with localStorage cleaning, you should edit the catch statement to launch appropriate cleaning actions if the exception name e.name ==== 'QUOTA_EXCEEDED_ERR' (Chrome) or 'NS_ERROR_DOM_QUOTA_REACHED' (Firefox/Safari) or if localStorage.remainingSpace === 0 in IE. – KrisWebDev Feb 23 '14 at 12:29
14

I'd check that localStorage is defined prior to any action that depends on it:

if (typeof localStorage !== 'undefined') {
    var x = localStorage.getItem('mod');
} else {
    // localStorage not defined
}

UPDATE:

If you need to validate that the feature is there and that it is also not turned off, you have to use a safer approach. To be perfectly safe:

if (typeof localStorage !== 'undefined') {
    try {
        localStorage.setItem('feature_test', 'yes');
        if (localStorage.getItem('feature_test') === 'yes') {
            localStorage.removeItem('feature_test');
            // localStorage is enabled
        } else {
            // localStorage is disabled
        }
    } catch(e) {
        // localStorage is disabled
    }
} else {
    // localStorage is not available
}
  • 1
    Under the given circumstances, this is just a feature that will prevent other browsers from erroring... so this doesn't really answer the question. If turned off, localStorage still is defined in window. – Kiruse May 7 '13 at 20:17
  • You still get a DOM error...I just can't believe there is no way to check if it's turned off completely... – user2025469 May 7 '13 at 20:21
  • 1
    This isn't a safe approach for Chrome and Opera... likely not Safari either because localStorage is completely inaccessible and an exception will be thrown. – Shikkediel Dec 8 '16 at 17:06
  • You don't need all those elses... Just a single try catch should do. I see you are testing that the result is actually 'yes', but I no of no use case in which that is actually necessary. – Stijn de Witt Jan 23 '17 at 18:44
8

Feature-detecting local storage is tricky. You need to actually reach into it. The reason for this is that Safari has chosen to offer a functional localStorage object when in private mode, but with it's quotum set to zero. This means that although all simple feature detects will pass, any calls to localStorage.setItem will throw an exception.

Mozilla's Developer Network entry on the Web Storage API's has a dedicated section on feature detecting local storage. Here is the method recommended on that page:

function storageAvailable(type) {
    try {
        var storage = window[type],
            x = '__storage_test__';
        storage.setItem(x, x);
        storage.removeItem(x);
        return true;
    }
    catch(e) {
        return false;
    }
}

And here is how you would use it:

if (storageAvailable('localStorage')) {
    // Yippee! We can use localStorage awesomeness
}
else {
    // Too bad, no localStorage for us
}

If you are using NPM, you can grab storage-available using

npm install -S storage-available

then use the function like so:

if (require('storage-available')('localStorage')) {
    // Yippee! We can use localStorage awesomeness
}

Disclaimer: Both the documentation section on MDN and the NPM package were authored by me.

3

MDN updated the storage detect function. In 2018, it's more reliable:

function storageAvailable() {
    try {
        var storage = window['localStorage'],
            x = '__storage_test__';
        storage.setItem(x, x);
        storage.removeItem(x);
        return true;
    }
    catch(e) {
        return e instanceof DOMException && (
            // everything except Firefox
            e.code === 22 ||
            // Firefox
            e.code === 1014 ||
            // test name field too, because code might not be present
            // everything except Firefox
            e.name === 'QuotaExceededError' ||
            // Firefox
            e.name === 'NS_ERROR_DOM_QUOTA_REACHED') &&
            // acknowledge QuotaExceededError only if there's something already stored
            storage.length !== 0;
    }
}

Browsers that support localStorage will have a property on the window object named localStorage. However, for various reasons, just asserting that property exists may throw exceptions. If it does exist, that is still no guarantee that localStorage is actually available, as various browsers offer settings that disable localStorage. So a browser may support localStorage, but not make it available to the scripts on the page. One example of that is Safari, which in Private Browsing mode gives us an empty localStorage object with a quota of zero, effectively making it unusable. However, we might still get a legitimate QuotaExceededError, which only means that we've used up all available storage space, but storage is actually available. Our feature detect should take these scenarios into account.

See here for a brief history of feature-detecting localStorage.

  • This isn't the exact behavior I'm seeing in Safari with iOS 12.1. I'm able to set things and retrieve them - they just don't persist after I close that tab. Even if I visit another website in the same tab and come back my saved data is still there. So not sure how old this comment is. – Simon_Weaver Apr 2 at 19:39
  • Apparently it was a bug that was since fixed - stackoverflow.com/questions/14555347/…. Have to assume if your users are in private mode they expect to lose 'session' when they go away and come back. – Simon_Weaver Apr 2 at 19:41
0

With this function you can check if localstorage is available or not, and you keep under control the possible exceptions.

function isLocalStorageAvailable() {

    try {
        var valueToStore = 'test';
        var mykey = 'key';
        localStorage.setItem(mykey, valueToStore);
        var recoveredValue = localStorage.getItem(mykey);
        localStorage.removeItem(mykey);

        return recoveredValue === valueToStore;
    } catch(e) {
        return false;
    }
}
-2

Here is an easy check:

if(typeof localStorage === 'undefined'){

  • 3
    The type of localStorage returns object, even if it is disabled in Firefox or IE. In Chrome and Opera typeof throws an exception and breaks the whole script when the user has turned it off... – Shikkediel Dec 8 '16 at 3:29
  • 1
    great comment @Shikkediel thanks for that – Brady Dec 8 '16 at 15:47
  • And in Safari in Private Browsing mode, you get a working localStorage object that has a quota of zero and thus throws an exception whenever you try to write to it. Which is why the local storage feature detecting code now always tries to write an item. – Stijn de Witt Jan 23 '17 at 18:42
-2

Modifying Joe's answer to add a getter makes it easier to use. With the below you simply say: if(ls)...

Object.defineProperty(this, "ls", {
  get: function () { 
    var test = 'test';
    try {
      localStorage.setItem(test, test);
      localStorage.removeItem(test);
      return true;
    } catch(e) {
      return false;
    }
  }
});
  • Why the downvote? It works, and typing ls is better than typing lsTest() === true. ...? – Ron Royston Jan 4 '17 at 16:12
  • It does not work. You are assigning an object to ls... as such if (ls) will always evaluate to true. Just check it by changing your get method to read get: function(){return false} and you will see. Also, typing ls is not better.... This test is going to not be too often in your code (if you write it in a smart way), so why pollute the (global) scope with a very short variable? – Stijn de Witt Jan 23 '17 at 18:33
  • your right. I'm gonna have to fix that... Thank you! – Ron Royston Jan 23 '17 at 18:52
  • @StijndeWitt it works now. Thanks for your feedback... In terms of polluting the global scope, I see your point but I think that's an opinion. Somebody might find that typing if(ls){... is worth it. – Ron Royston Jan 23 '17 at 20:23
-3

Use this to check localStorage is set or not. Its help you to get status of Localstorage.

    if( window.localStorage.fullName !== undefined){

           //action
   }else{
          }
  • 4
    You don't need to wait for the document to be loaded to access localStorage (so $() is pointless) More importantly, this code will throw an error if localStorage is unavailable. – 1j01 Mar 8 '14 at 14:38
  • Actually, Mozilla docs state that localStorage is synchronous in nature so it can block rendering of the main document. Waiting for it to be ready would therefore be a good approach. – Shikkediel Dec 8 '16 at 17:35
  • What they mean by saying that localStorage is synchronous is that localStorage.getItem('someKey') actually immediately returns the item. It does not accept a callback function or return a Promise, it just returns the data right away. Contrast that to e.g. var result = fetch('https://example.com/data.json')... that returns a Promise, which makes it async. You'll have to call the then method to get at the data (will only happen during the next tick): result.then(function(data){ /* only here do we get the data */ }) – Stijn de Witt Jan 23 '17 at 18:40
  • It's about the fact that synchronous calls block rendering, interrupting further parsing of the page. Callback behaviour is rather irrelevant here. – Shikkediel Jan 30 '17 at 8:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.