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When I read the book related to compiler , I saw that there are two major memory models.

Register to Register model and Memory to memory model.

In the book, it says that register-to-register models ignore machine limitations on the number of registers, and compiler back-ends must insert loads and stores. Is it because register-to-register models can use virtual registers...and this model keeps all values that can be stored in registers, so before finishing it must insert loads and stores (related to memory)?

Also, in the memory to memory part, the book says that the compiler back-end can remove redundant loads and stores. Does it mean that the model has to remove redundant uses of memory for optimization?

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I'm going to answer your question in the context of compilers because that's what you said you were reading about. In a computer architecture context these answers will not apply, so read with caution.

Is it because register-to-register models can use virtual registers...and this model keeps all values that can be stored in registers, so before finishing it must insert loads and stores (related to memory)?

That's likely one reason. If the underlying machine does not support register/register operations, then the "virtual register" operations will need to be translated into loads and stores instead. Similarly, if your compiler assumes an infinite register machine during the IR phase, it might be necessary to spill some registers to memory during the register allocation phase (in which you map your infinite set of virtual registers to a finite set of real registers, using memory accesses when you run out).

Does it mean that the model has to remove redundant uses of memory for optimization?

Yes, this is something the compiler may do as an optimization step. If we do something like this:

register1 <- LOAD 1234
// Operation using register 1 that leaves the result in register 1
STORE register1, 1234
register1 <- LOAD 1234
// Another operation that uses register 1
STORE register1, 1235

This can be optimised to simply leave the value in the register instead, like this:

register1 <- LOAD 1234
// Operation using register 1 that leaves the result in register 1
// Another operation that uses register 1
STORE register1, 1235

This is clearly more efficient because it avoids additional DRAM accesses that are slow when compared to registers.

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