If I execute the following code:

QList<int> l;
QList<int>::const_iterator lI;

l.append(1);
l.append(2);
l.append(3);
l.append(4);
lI = l.constEnd();

while(lI != l.constBegin()) {
  std::cout << *lI << std::endl;
  --lI;
}

I get this output:

17
4
3
2

I already solved it by using the QListIterator<int>, but I really don't get why this isn't working!

Thanks in advance ...

  • 1
    In the first iteration you're dereferencing an end iterator. These are not dereferencable and you're invoking undefined behavior. – jrok May 8 '13 at 13:04
  • Then I don't understand why it is working the other way around! If you set lI to constBegin, change the if-condition to ask for constEnd and increment the iterator in each iteration, then you get the correct output. – janr May 8 '13 at 13:11
  • 3
    begin() == first element, end() == one past the end. That's why it works the other way around. – cmannett85 May 8 '13 at 13:15

Try

lI = l.constEnd() - 1;

I'm not sure if that solves your problem, but as far as I know, end iterators always point one past the end of the container.

I just wanted to address your concern in the comments. When you do this:

lI = l.constEnd();

while(lI != l.constBegin()) {
  std::cout << *lI << std::endl;
  --lI;
}

You start off the end of the container, and the loop never reaches constBegin. That's because when you decrement, lI becomes constBegin and the while loop doesn't execute. (That's why 1 is never outputted.)

But if you do:

lI = l.constBegin();

while(lI != l.constEnd()) {
  std::cout << *lI << std::endl;
  ++lI;
}

The same thing happens, except the loop terminates once it reaches constEnd. Logically it makes sense, as if constEnd didn't point past the end of the container, it would cut off and not output 4.

  • Thanks, this doesn't fully solve my problem, but I came up with a solution. You've to change the position of the decrementation. I'll add this in a new answer ... – janr May 8 '13 at 13:18
  • 1
    lI = l.constEnd() - 1; is a mistake. If the list is empty, l.constBegin() == l.constEnd(), so you should never use l.constEnd() - 1 unless you are certain that list is not empty. – Alexey Sep 25 '13 at 6:59
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Thanks for the help, I didn't know that end() isn't pointing to the last element. Therefore, you only have to decrement before you use the node value.

while(lI != l.constBegin()) {
  --lI;
  std::cout << *lI << std::endl;
}

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.