1

I try to read a file backwards (from end to begin). The example below does this, but I would like to ask the community - is there a more elegant solution to my question?

import os, binascii

CHUNK = 10 #read file by blocks (big size)
src_file_path = 'd:\\src\\python\\test\\main.zip' 
src_file_size = os.path.getsize(src_file_path)
src_file = open(src_file_path, 'rb') #open in binary mode
while src_file_size > 0:
    #read file from last byte to first :)
    if src_file_size > CHUNK:
        src_file.seek(src_file_size - CHUNK)
        byte_list = src_file.read(CHUNK)
    else:
        src_file.seek(0)
        byte_list = src_file.read(src_file_size)
    s = binascii.hexlify(byte_list) #convert '\xFB' -> 'FB'
    byte_list = [(chr(s[i]) + chr(s[i+1])) for i in range(0, len(s), 2)] #split, note below
    print(byte_list[::-1]) #output reverse list
    src_file_size = src_file_size - CHUNK
src_file.close() #close file

UPD I would like to know the opinion of experts - what do I need to pay attention as newbie in Python? Is there a potential flaw in this code?

Thanks in advance.

I'm using Python 3.3.1 Note: split by bytes from here!

1

I can see several things to be improved in the code from the question. Firstly, the while loop is rarely used in Python because there is almost always better way to express the same using the for loop or using some built-in functions.

I guess the code is purely for a training purpose or so. Otherwise, I would ask first what is the real goal (because knowing the problem, the better solution may be very different than the first idea).

The goal here is to get the positions for the seek. You know the size, you know the chunk size, you want to go backwards. There is the built-in generator for the purpose in Python named range. A single argument is mostly used; however, range(start, stop, step) is the full form. The generator can be iterated in the for loop, or you can use the values say to build a list of them (but you often do not need the later case). The positions for the seek can be generated like this:

chunk = 10
sz = 235

lst = list(range(sz - chunk, 0, -chunk))
print(lst)

I.e., you start from sz - chunk position, stop at zero (not often) using the negative value for the next generated value. Here the list() iterates through all the values and builds the list of them. But you can iterate directly through the generated values:

for pos in range(sz - chunk, 0, -chunk):
    print('seek({}) and read({})'.format(pos, chunk))

if pos > 0:
    print('seek({}) and read({})'.format(0, pos))

The last generated position is or zero or positive. This way, the last if processes the last portion when it is shorter than chunk. Putting the above code together, it prints:

c:\tmp\_Python\wikicsm\so16443185>py a.py
[225, 215, 205, 195, 185, 175, 165, 155, 145, 135, 125, 115, 105, 95,
85, 75, 65, 55, 45, 35, 25, 15, 5]
seek(225) and read(10)
seek(215) and read(10)
seek(205) and read(10)
seek(195) and read(10)
seek(185) and read(10)
seek(175) and read(10)
seek(165) and read(10)
seek(155) and read(10)
seek(145) and read(10)
seek(135) and read(10)
seek(125) and read(10)
seek(115) and read(10)
seek(105) and read(10)
seek(95) and read(10)
seek(85) and read(10)
seek(75) and read(10)
seek(65) and read(10)
seek(55) and read(10)
seek(45) and read(10)
seek(35) and read(10)
seek(25) and read(10)
seek(15) and read(10)
seek(5) and read(10)
seek(0) and read(5)

I personally would replace the print's by calling the function that would take the file object, pos, and the chunk size. Here the faked body to produce the same prints:

#!python3
import os

def processChunk(f, pos, chunk_size):
    print('faked f: seek({}) and read({})'.format(pos, chunk_size))


fname = 'a.txt'
sz = os.path.getsize(fname)     # not checking existence for simplicity
chunk = 16

with open(fname, 'rb') as f:
    for pos in range(sz - chunk, 0, -chunk):
        processChunk(f, pos, chunk)

    if pos > 0:
        processChunk(f, 0, pos)

The with construct is another one good to learn. (Warning, nothing similar to Pascal's with.) It closes the file object automatically after the block ends. Notice that the code below the withis more readable and need not to be changed in future. The processChunk will be developed further:

def processChunk(f, pos, chunk_size):
    f.seek(pos)
    s = binascii.hexlify(f.read(chunk_size))
    print(s)

or you can change it slightly so that its result is a reversed hexdump (the full code tested on my computer):

#!python3

import binascii
import os

def processChunk(f, pos, chunk_size):
    f.seek(pos)
    b = f.read(chunk_size)
    b1 = b[:8]                  # first 8 bytes
    b2 = b[8:]                  # the rest
    s1 = ' '.join('{:02x}'.format(x) for x in b1)
    s2 = ' '.join('{:02x}'.format(x) for x in b2)
    print('{:08x}:'.format(pos), s1, '|', s2)


fname = 'a.txt'
sz = os.path.getsize(fname)     # not checking existence for simplicity
chunk = 16

with open(fname, 'rb') as f:

    for pos in range(sz - chunk, 0, -chunk):
        processChunk(f, pos, chunk)

    if pos > 0:
        processChunk(f, 0, pos)

When a.txt is the copy of the last code, it produces:

c:\tmp\_Python\wikicsm\so16443185>py d.py
00000274: 75 6e 6b 28 66 2c 20 30 | 2c 20 70 6f 73 29 0d 0a
00000264: 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 70 | 72 6f 63 65 73 73 43 68
00000254: 20 20 69 66 20 70 6f 73 | 20 3e 20 30 3a 0d 0a 20
00000244: 6f 73 2c 20 63 68 75 6e | 6b 29 0d 0a 0d 0a 20 20
00000234: 72 6f 63 65 73 73 43 68 | 75 6e 6b 28 66 2c 20 70
00000224: 75 6e 6b 29 3a 0d 0a 20 | 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 70
00000214: 20 2d 20 63 68 75 6e 6b | 2c 20 30 2c 20 2d 63 68
00000204: 20 70 6f 73 20 69 6e 20 | 72 61 6e 67 65 28 73 7a
000001f4: 61 73 20 66 3a 0d 0a 0d | 0a 20 20 20 20 66 6f 72
000001e4: 65 6e 28 66 6e 61 6d 65 | 2c 20 27 72 62 27 29 20
000001d4: 20 3d 20 31 36 0d 0a 0d | 0a 77 69 74 68 20 6f 70
000001c4: 69 6d 70 6c 69 63 69 74 | 79 0d 0a 63 68 75 6e 6b
000001b4: 20 65 78 69 73 74 65 6e | 63 65 20 66 6f 72 20 73
000001a4: 20 20 23 20 6e 6f 74 20 | 63 68 65 63 6b 69 6e 67
00000194: 65 74 73 69 7a 65 28 66 | 6e 61 6d 65 29 20 20 20
00000184: 0d 0a 73 7a 20 3d 20 6f | 73 2e 70 61 74 68 2e 67
00000174: 0a 66 6e 61 6d 65 20 3d | 20 27 61 2e 74 78 74 27
00000164: 31 2c 20 27 7c 27 2c 20 | 73 32 29 0d 0a 0d 0a 0d
00000154: 27 2e 66 6f 72 6d 61 74 | 28 70 6f 73 29 2c 20 73
00000144: 20 20 70 72 69 6e 74 28 | 27 7b 3a 30 38 78 7d 3a
00000134: 66 6f 72 20 78 20 69 6e | 20 62 32 29 0d 0a 20 20
00000124: 30 32 78 7d 27 2e 66 6f | 72 6d 61 74 28 78 29 20
00000114: 32 20 3d 20 27 20 27 2e | 6a 6f 69 6e 28 27 7b 3a
00000104: 20 78 20 69 6e 20 62 31 | 29 0d 0a 20 20 20 20 73
000000f4: 7d 27 2e 66 6f 72 6d 61 | 74 28 78 29 20 66 6f 72
000000e4: 20 27 20 27 2e 6a 6f 69 | 6e 28 27 7b 3a 30 32 78
000000d4: 65 20 72 65 73 74 0d 0a | 20 20 20 20 73 31 20 3d
000000c4: 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 | 20 20 20 20 23 20 74 68
000000b4: 62 32 20 3d 20 62 5b 38 | 3a 5d 20 20 20 20 20 20
000000a4: 73 74 20 38 20 62 79 74 | 65 73 0d 0a 20 20 20 20
00000094: 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 | 20 20 20 23 20 66 69 72
00000084: 31 20 3d 20 62 5b 3a 38 | 5d 20 20 20 20 20 20 20
00000074: 75 6e 6b 5f 73 69 7a 65 | 29 0d 0a 20 20 20 20 62
00000064: 20 20 20 62 20 3d 20 66 | 2e 72 65 61 64 28 63 68
00000054: 20 20 66 2e 73 65 65 6b | 28 70 6f 73 29 0d 0a 20
00000044: 63 68 75 6e 6b 5f 73 69 | 7a 65 29 3a 0d 0a 20 20
00000034: 73 73 43 68 75 6e 6b 28 | 66 2c 20 70 6f 73 2c 20
00000024: 20 6f 73 0d 0a 0d 0a 64 | 65 66 20 70 72 6f 63 65
00000014: 62 69 6e 61 73 63 69 69 | 0d 0a 69 6d 70 6f 72 74
00000004: 74 68 6f 6e 33 0d 0a 0d | 0a 69 6d 70 6f 72 74 20
00000000: 23 21 70 79 |

For the src_file_path = 'd:\\src\\python\\test\\main.zip', you can use forward slashes like src_file_path = 'd:/src/python/test/main.zip' also in Windows. Or you can use raw strings like src_file_path = r'd:\src\python\test\main.zip'. The last case is used when you need to avoid doubling backslashes -- often when writing regular expresions.

  • Thank you for your comments, pepr. For me, your opinion is valuable, I will try to stop using while. Unfortunately, this is not for the purpose of training, I want to write a program simulating the behavior of my algorithm. Chose language Python, because of its clarity and broad support. But as I'm new, I'm looking at all the code samples eyes wide open, even frightening at times :). – user1372972 May 8 '13 at 17:02
  • For three days, I have already moved well - I know how to read a file, process it and write back to the file. It remains the case for small - to connect all the small features into one ... The construction for pos in range (sz - chunk, 0,-chunk): I liked, it intuitive. Thank you again for your comment. – user1372972 May 8 '13 at 17:02
  • If the while loop should be used, then I recommend to rename the src_file_size to pos. Then you will notice the bug in while pos > 0:. Actually, the zero value must be also accepted (i.e. >= 0). – pepr May 8 '13 at 17:33
  • Fantastic! I'm impressed! :) You filled space positive energy, I want to do more than planned for today! Thank you very much for the educational program! ;) – user1372972 May 8 '13 at 17:33
  • Actually, there is a bug in the last def processChunk implementation. You will get my +1 for your comment when finding it, and another +1 if you describe as short fix as possible ;) Opinions may differ what should be the output and how it should be fixed. This is not important. The important is to spot the bug. – pepr Jul 3 '13 at 7:03
2

Elaborating on tim-hoffman 's great answer with mmap here. (sorry, I would comment instead of answer, but I don't have enough stackfoo to comment yet).

import mmap
# Reverses a binary byte-wise in an efficient manner
with open("out.bin","wb") as w:
    with open("in.bin,"rb") as f:
        # read-only access or you get an access-denied or need to use r+b permissions
        mm = mmap.mmap(f.fileno(),0,access=mmap.ACCESS_READ)
        w.write(mm[::-1])
1

An alternative approach is to use mmap.

http://docs.python.org/2/library/mmap.html

In this example the text file has contents of '0987654321\n'

>>> import mmap
>>> f = open("x.txt","r+b")
>>> mm = mmap.mmap(f.fileno(), 0)
>>> mm[0:]
'0987654321\n'
>>> 
>>> for i in range(len(mm),0,-1):
...     if i == 1:
...          print i,repr(mm[0:1])
...     else:
...          print i,repr(mm[i-1:i-2:-1])
... 
11 '\n'
10 '1'
9 '2'
8 '3'
7 '4'
6 '5'
5 '6'
4 '7'
3 '8'
2 '9'
1 '0'

You can then alter you chunksize using range and slicing. Lets step backwards in chunks of 3.

>>> for i in range(len(mm)-1,-1,-3):
...   if i < 3:
...      print i,repr(mm[0:i+1])
...   else:
...      print i,repr(mm[i:i-3:-1])
... 
10 '\n12'
7 '345'
4 '678'
1 '09'
>>> 

A big advantage is you do not need to do any reversing etc....

  • Thanks for the reply, Tim. I'm about to catch the essence of your idea, but I know little English, minimum night will translate the documentation for this function :( – user1372972 May 8 '13 at 16:19

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