65

I'd like to sum the values of an object.

I'm used to python where it would just be:

sample = { 'a': 1 , 'b': 2 , 'c':3 };
summed =  sum(sample.itervalues())     

The following code works, but it's a lot of code:

function obj_values(object) {
  var results = [];
  for (var property in object)
    results.push(object[property]);
  return results;
}

function list_sum( list ){
  return list.reduce(function(previousValue, currentValue, index, array){
      return previousValue + currentValue;
  });
}

function object_values_sum( obj ){
  return list_sum(obj_values(obj));
}

var sample = { a: 1 , b: 2 , c:3 };
var summed =  list_sum(obj_values(a));
var summed =  object_values_sum(a)

Am i missing anything obvious, or is this just the way it is?

11 Answers 11

57

You could put it all in one function:

function sum( obj ) {
  var sum = 0;
  for( var el in obj ) {
    if( obj.hasOwnProperty( el ) ) {
      sum += parseFloat( obj[el] );
    }
  }
  return sum;
}
    
var sample = { a: 1 , b: 2 , c:3 };
var summed = sum( sample );
console.log( "sum: "+summed );


For fun's sake here is another implementation using Object.keys() and Array.reduce() (browser support should not be a big issue anymore):

function sum(obj) {
  return Object.keys(obj).reduce((sum,key)=>sum+parseFloat(obj[key]||0),0);
}
let sample = { a: 1 , b: 2 , c:3 };

console.log(`sum:${sum(sample)}`);

But this seems to be way slower: jsperf.com

  • return sum + parseFloat( obj[key] || 0) to check the falsey or null /blank values – sumit Mar 5 '18 at 0:49
75

It can be as simple as that:

const sumValues = obj => Object.values(obj).reduce((a, b) => a + b);

Quoting MDN:

The Object.values() method returns an array of a given object's own enumerable property values, in the same order as that provided by a for...in loop (the difference being that a for-in loop enumerates properties in the prototype chain as well).

from Object.values() on MDN

The reduce() method applies a function against an accumulator and each value of the array (from left-to-right) to reduce it to a single value.

from Array.prototype.reduce() on MDN

You can use this function like that:

sumValues({a: 4, b: 6, c: -5, d: 0}); // gives 5

Note that this code uses some ECMAScript features which are not supported by some older browsers (like IE). You might need to use Babel to compile your code.

  • 3
    This requires you pull a 60K library just to have Object.values(), which will be polyfilled with a for loop on every browser besides Firefox. Even without a polyfill, it's 4x slower than a regular for loop for me. – Blender Aug 19 '16 at 20:21
  • 8
    @Blender You need to use Babel anyway if you want to use any of the new ECMAScript features and still support older browsers. Besides, if someone visits this question for example after 2 years, modern browsers will probably implement Object.values() until that time. – Michał Perłakowski Aug 19 '16 at 20:48
  • The accepted answer has a very similar approach, but the function passed to reduce seems a bit more foolproof. Did you leave out the parsing on purpose? – Cerbrus Aug 20 '16 at 11:59
  • @Cerbrus I assumed that all values in that object are numbers. – Michał Perłakowski Aug 20 '16 at 12:02
  • 8
    @Blender It seems I was right – a year and a half passed, and Object.values() is supported by all modern browsers. – Michał Perłakowski Mar 5 '18 at 0:50
18

A regular for loop is pretty concise:

var total = 0;

for (var property in object) {
    total += object[property];
}

You might have to add in object.hasOwnProperty if you modified the prototype.

18

If you're using lodash you can do something like

_.sum(_.values({ 'a': 1 , 'b': 2 , 'c':3 })) 
12

Any reason you're not just using a simple for...in loop?

var sample = { a: 1 , b: 2 , c:3 };
var summed = 0;

for (var key in sample) {
    summed += sample[key];
};

http://jsfiddle.net/vZhXs/

8

Honestly, given our "modern times" I'd go with a functional programming approach whenever possible, like so:

const sumValues = (obj) => Object.keys(obj).reduce((acc, value) => acc + obj[value], 0);

Our accumulator acc, starting with a value of 0, is accumulating all looped values of our object. This has the added benefit of not depending on any internal or external variables; it's a constant function so it won't be accidentally overwritten... win for ES2015!

4

Now you can make use of reduce function and get the sum.

const object1 = { 'a': 1 , 'b': 2 , 'c':3 }

console.log(Object.values(object1).reduce((a, b) => a + b, 0));

1

I am a bit tardy to the party, however, if you require a more robust and flexible solution then here is my contribution. If you want to sum only a specific property in a nested object/array combo, as well as perform other aggregate methods, then here is a little function I have been using on a React project:

var aggregateProperty = function(obj, property, aggregate, shallow, depth) {
    //return aggregated value of a specific property within an object (or array of objects..)

    if ((typeof obj !== 'object' && typeof obj !== 'array') || !property) {
        return;
    }

    obj = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj)); //an ugly way of copying the data object instead of pointing to its reference (so the original data remains unaffected)
    const validAggregates = [ 'sum', 'min', 'max', 'count' ];
    aggregate = (validAggregates.indexOf(aggregate.toLowerCase()) !== -1 ? aggregate.toLowerCase() : 'sum'); //default to sum

    //default to false (if true, only searches (n) levels deep ignoring deeply nested data)
    if (shallow === true) {
        shallow = 2;
    } else if (isNaN(shallow) || shallow < 2) {
        shallow = false;
    }

    if (isNaN(depth)) {
        depth = 1; //how far down the rabbit hole have we travelled?
    }

    var value = ((aggregate == 'min' || aggregate == 'max') ? null : 0);
    for (var prop in obj) {
        if (!obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
            continue;
        }

        var propValue = obj[prop];
        var nested = (typeof propValue === 'object' || typeof propValue === 'array');
        if (nested) {
            //the property is an object or an array

            if (prop == property && aggregate == 'count') {
                value++;
            }

            if (shallow === false || depth < shallow) {
                propValue = aggregateProperty(propValue, property, aggregate, shallow, depth+1); //recursively aggregate nested objects and arrays
            } else {
                continue; //skip this property
            }
        }

        //aggregate the properties value based on the selected aggregation method
        if ((prop == property || nested) && propValue) {
            switch(aggregate) {
                case 'sum':
                    if (!isNaN(propValue)) {
                        value += propValue;
                    }
                    break;
                case 'min':
                    if ((propValue < value) || !value) {
                        value = propValue;
                    }
                    break;
                case 'max':
                    if ((propValue > value) || !value) {
                        value = propValue;
                    }
                    break;
                case 'count':
                    if (propValue) {
                        if (nested) {
                            value += propValue;
                        } else {
                            value++;
                        }
                    }
                    break;
            }
        }
    }

    return value;
}

It is recursive, non ES6, and it should work in most semi-modern browsers. You use it like this:

const onlineCount = aggregateProperty(this.props.contacts, 'online', 'count');

Parameter breakdown:

obj = either an object or an array
property = the property within the nested objects/arrays you wish to perform the aggregate method on
aggregate = the aggregate method (sum, min, max, or count)
shallow = can either be set to true/false or a numeric value
depth = should be left null or undefined (it is used to track the subsequent recursive callbacks)

Shallow can be used to enhance performance if you know that you will not need to search deeply nested data. For instance if you had the following array:

[
    {
        id: 1,
        otherData: { ... },
        valueToBeTotaled: ?
    },
    {
        id: 2,
        otherData: { ... },
        valueToBeTotaled: ?
    },
    {
        id: 3,
        otherData: { ... },
        valueToBeTotaled: ?
    },
    ...
]

If you wanted to avoid looping through the otherData property since the value you are going to be aggregating is not nested that deeply, you could set shallow to true.

0

I came across this solution from @jbabey while trying to solve a similar problem. With a little modification, I got it right. In my case, the object keys are numbers (489) and strings ("489"). Hence to solve this, each key is parse. The following code works:

var array = {"nR": 22, "nH": 7, "totB": "2761", "nSR": 16, "htRb": "91981"}
var parskey = 0;
for (var key in array) {
    parskey = parseInt(array[key]);
    sum += parskey;
};
return(sum);
0

A ramda one liner:

import {
 compose, 
 sum,
 values,
} from 'ramda'

export const sumValues = compose(sum, values);

Use: const summed = sumValues({ 'a': 1 , 'b': 2 , 'c':3 });

0

Use Lodash

 import _ from 'Lodash';
 
 var object_array = [{a: 1, b: 2, c: 3}, {a: 4, b: 5, c: 6}];
 
 return _.sumBy(object_array, 'c')
 
 // return => 9

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