7

I have just started learning javascript from w3school and I have found out that "You can only use document.write in the HTML output. If you use it after the document has loaded, the whole document will be overwritten." so I have tried to write following code to check the validity:

<html>
    <head>
        <title>ashish javascript learning</title>
        <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
    </head>
    <body>
        <p> sample html with javascript </p>
        <script>
            document.write("<h1>this is heading</h1>");
            document.write("<p>this is sample para</p>");
        </script>
        <script>
            if(document.readyState === "complete"){
                loaded();
            }
            function loaded(){
                document.write("<p>loading content after the document has been loaded");
            }
        </script>
    </body>
</html>

Code is still showing the old value and is not overwriting the content of the web page. Could you suggest me what am I doing wrongly.

5
  • 3
    Why are you using document.write? – Šime Vidas May 8 '13 at 22:05
  • 4
    @Ashish: One of the reliable JavaScript resources would be the JavaScript MDN which has tons of links to good resources and guides. – Nope May 8 '13 at 22:05
  • 1
    Basically each of your document.write calls still happens during initial page creation. The if part will just evaluate to false and loaded() will never be called. – devnull69 May 8 '13 at 22:06
  • 1
    @ŠimeVidas 'cause of the terrible w3schools examples, I'd guess. – Fabrício Matté May 8 '13 at 22:06
  • @FrançoisWahl Thanks for the link. I will stop learning from w3 school and start learning for the link you have posted. – Ashish May 8 '13 at 22:17
17

At the time you're testing document.readyState === "complete", the document's readyState isn't "complete", it "loading", so nothing happens, and loaded is never called.

You can listen for the readyState to change, and then check to see if it is "complete" (or listen to window.onload which is easier):

document.onreadystatechange = function () {
  if(document.readyState === "complete"){
    loaded();
  }
}
2
  • if my document is popup with pdf to download that is generated , the popup opens and its in complete ready state but the file is not loaded yet , can you advise thanks. – shareef Jan 25 '18 at 19:21
  • 1
    Avoid assigning value of document.onreadystatechange Instead use document.addEventListener('readystatechange', function(evt) {}) – Vishnu May 22 '18 at 5:46
4

Because the mechanism is event based. You should only ever use that once the DOM is actually loaded, so it's pointless.

The evaluation is done in place, but at the time of the evaluation document.readyState == "complete" is false, so nothing happens.

The simple way to do things:

window.onload = function() {
    loaded();
};
3

What you need to do is hook a function to the readystatechange event then check for the readystate value.

document.onreadystatechange = function () {
    if (document.readyState === 'complete') {
        initApplication();
    }
}
0

sorry for no explanation; when the code execute on the javascript the dom is not completed ,so the document's readyState is not 'complete',then the initApplication funtion will not be called; If you want to call the initApplication function,you have to add an trigger to the document.I add an trigger like 'document.onreadystatechange'."document.onreadystatechange" will be called when the document's state is changed; so when the document is loaded ,the "document.onreadystatechange" will be called

0

An excellent resource with multiple examples and explanations is: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/API/Document/readyState

So in your case this applies:

document.onreadystatechange = function () {
  if (document.readyState === "complete") {
    initApplication();
  }
}
0

write like this ,you will get the result you want

document.onreadystatechange = function(){
   if(document.readyState == 'complete'){
      document.write('document is overwrite')
   }
}
1
  • could you explain why? just giving an answer with no explanation whatsoever is not constructive, and does not answer the Why part of the question – glls Aug 26 '16 at 3:13

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