32

I am trying to find a simple and fast way of counting the number of Objects in a list that match a criteria. e.g.

class Person:
    def __init__(self, Name, Age, Gender):
        self.Name = Name
        self.Age = Age
        self.Gender = Gender

# List of People
PeopleList = [Person("Joan", 15, "F"), 
              Person("Henry", 18, "M"), 
              Person("Marg", 21, "F")]

Now what's the simplest function for counting the number of objects in this list that match an argument based on their attributes? E.g., returning 2 for Person.Gender == "F" or Person.Age < 20.

39
class Person:
    def __init__(self, Name, Age, Gender):
        self.Name = Name
        self.Age = Age
        self.Gender = Gender


>>> PeopleList = [Person("Joan", 15, "F"), 
              Person("Henry", 18, "M"), 
              Person("Marg", 21, "F")]
>>> sum(p.Gender == "F" for p in PeopleList)
2
>>> sum(p.Age < 20 for p in PeopleList)
2
  • 20
    I prefer sum(1 for p in PeopleList if p.Gender == "F") because it doesn't abuse the fact that bool subclass int. – wim May 9 '13 at 6:40
  • 5
  • 3
    I have to agree with @wim here. Even being a long time python programmer, it took me awhile to evaluate what was being done with the sum statement. I find sum(1 for p in PeopleList if p.Gender == "F") more explicit. – monkut May 9 '13 at 7:12
  • 5
    But it is not perfectly clear. Perhaps it's clear to computer science folks and those who have been using python before bools even existed in the language, but it's not obvious to someone with a mathematical mind for whom "True" and "the number 1" are conceptually very different objects. The sum over the condition is a mental stumbling block, and it requires an extra moment of thinking compared to reading the direct comprehension. – wim May 9 '13 at 8:18
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    @monkut Guido States using False and True as list indices is perfectly fine. He also said other such clear idioms. This is also a clear use of False and True – jamylak May 23 '15 at 9:13
11

I know this is an old question but these days one stdlib way to do this would be

from collections import Counter

c = Counter(getattr(person, 'gender') for person in PeopleList)
# c now is a map of attribute values to counts -- eg: c['F']
  • 1
    Why are you using getattr(person, 'gender') instead of simply just person.gender? It's unnecessary and superfluous – jamylak Feb 25 at 1:20
  • @jamylak good point. I don't really remember. I perhaps was thinking in terms of dynamically selected attributes. For instance: c = { attr: Counter(getattr(person, attr) for person in PeopleList) for attr in ['Name', 'Age', 'Gender'] } , c now is a map of attributes to counter of values. Edit: I do remember now. It is that way because it evolved that way :) – lonetwin Feb 26 at 20:58
  • thanks for the clarification i can see how that . makes sense if we are simply counting each attribute but the question has examples . eg. Person.Age < 20 which isnt suited to this and better as a simple if statement – jamylak Feb 27 at 1:10
5

I found that using a list comprehension and getting its length was faster than using sum().

According to my tests...

len([p for p in PeopleList if p.Gender == 'F'])

...runs 1.59 times as fast as...

sum(p.Gender == "F" for p in PeopleList)
  • 1
    Not a fair test unless you also test sum([p.Gender == "F" for p in PeopleList]) and post results for tiny, medium and gigantic data – jamylak Feb 2 '18 at 5:48
1

Personally I think that defining a function is more simple over multiple uses:

def count(seq, pred):
    return sum(1 for v in seq if pred(v))

print(count(PeopleList, lambda p: p.Gender == "F"))
print(count(PeopleList, lambda p: p.Age < 20))

Particularly if you want to reuse a query.

  • Edit: I see, I swapped the position of the 'if'. thanks, fixed. – kampu May 13 '13 at 5:30
0

I prefer this:

def count(iterable):
    return sum(1 for _ in iterable)

Then you can use it like this:

femaleCount = count(p for p in PeopleList if p.Gender == "F")

which is cheap (doesn't create useless lists etc) and perfectly readable (I'd say better than both sum(1 for … if …) and sum(p.Gender == "F" for …)).

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