85

I'm wondering how to declare a 2D array in bash and then initialize to 0.

In C it looks like this:

int a[4][5] = {0};

And how do I assign a value to an element? As in C:

a[2][3] = 3;
2
  • 3
    Related: multi-dimensional arrays in BASH
    – Izzy
    Nov 6 '14 at 15:14
  • 4
    Btw a multi-dimensional array is actually (deep down) a one dimensional array, which is handled a little bit different especially when it comes to accessing its elements. For example a 3x4 matrix has 12 cells. The "rows" you traverse with an outer loop with a step of 3 and the "columns" you traverse with an inner loop with a step of 1. Jun 7 '15 at 20:49

12 Answers 12

81

You can simulate them for example with hashes, but need care about the leading zeroes and many other things. The next demonstration works, but it is far from optimal solution.

#!/bin/bash
declare -A matrix
num_rows=4
num_columns=5

for ((i=1;i<=num_rows;i++)) do
    for ((j=1;j<=num_columns;j++)) do
        matrix[$i,$j]=$RANDOM
    done
done

f1="%$((${#num_rows}+1))s"
f2=" %9s"

printf "$f1" ''
for ((i=1;i<=num_rows;i++)) do
    printf "$f2" $i
done
echo

for ((j=1;j<=num_columns;j++)) do
    printf "$f1" $j
    for ((i=1;i<=num_rows;i++)) do
        printf "$f2" ${matrix[$i,$j]}
    done
    echo
done

the above example creates a 4x5 matrix with random numbers and print it transposed, with the example result

           1         2         3         4
 1     18006     31193     16110     23297
 2     26229     19869      1140     19837
 3      8192      2181     25512      2318
 4      3269     25516     18701      7977
 5     31775     17358      4468     30345

The principle is: Creating one associative array where the index is an string like 3,4. The benefits:

  • it's possible to use for any-dimension arrays ;) like: 30,40,2 for 3 dimensional.
  • the syntax is close to "C" like arrays ${matrix[2,3]}
5
  • 2
    the obvious disadvantage of this method is that the length of a dimension cannot be known. Nonetheless, it works great in most other scenarios! Thanks!! Dec 13 '13 at 9:37
  • Please can you explain what f1 and f2 do?
    – CL22
    Oct 6 '16 at 10:03
  • 1
    @Jodes the f1 and f2 contains the format for the printf for the nice aligned printing. It could be hardcoded, for example printf "%2s" but using variables are more flexible - as in the above f1. The width of the row number is calculated as the length of $num_rows variable - e.g. if the number of rows $num_rows is 9, its length is 1 the format will be 1+1 so %2s. For the $num_rows 2500, its length is 4 so the format will be %5s - and so on...
    – jm666
    Oct 6 '16 at 13:51
  • Faced a big issue implementing this mehtod when it came to modifying array elements. E.g. for matrix[1,1]=0; matrix[2,1]=0; matrix[1,1]=1; you expect element matrix[2,1] keep 0 but in fact it comes 1. In other words, attempt to change element by one column index you modify all rows on that column index which is frustrating
    – mechanic
    Jul 14 at 21:13
  • @mechanic You forgot the declare. So this: declare -A matrix; matrix[1,1]=0; matrix[2,1]=0; matrix[1,1]=1; printf ${matrix[2,1]} prints 0 as it should.
    – jm666
    Aug 19 at 8:50
29

Bash doesn't have multi-dimensional array. But you can simulate a somewhat similar effect with associative arrays. The following is an example of associative array pretending to be used as multi-dimensional array:

declare -A arr
arr[0,0]=0
arr[0,1]=1
arr[1,0]=2
arr[1,1]=3
echo "${arr[0,0]} ${arr[0,1]}" # will print 0 1

If you don't declare the array as associative (with -A), the above won't work. For example, if you omit the declare -A arr line, the echo will print 2 3 instead of 0 1, because 0,0, 1,0 and such will be taken as arithmetic expression and evaluated to 0 (the value to the right of the comma operator).

0
24

Bash does not support multidimensional arrays.

You can simulate it though by using indirect expansion:

#!/bin/bash
declare -a a0=(1 2 3 4)
declare -a a1=(5 6 7 8)
var="a1[1]"
echo ${!var}  # outputs 6

Assignments are also possible with this method:

let $var=55
echo ${a1[1]}  # outputs 55

Edit 1: To read such an array from a file, with each row on a line, and values delimited by space, use this:

idx=0
while read -a a$idx; do
    let idx++;
done </tmp/some_file

Edit 2: To declare and initialize a0..a3[0..4] to 0, you could run:

for i in {0..3}; do
    eval "declare -a a$i=( $(for j in {0..4}; do echo 0; done) )"
done
3
  • Can you please demonstrate how to fill the above "2d array simulation" from a file-table? e.g. having a file with random number of rows and in each row containing 5 space delimited numbers.
    – kobame
    May 10 '13 at 18:29
  • @kobame: I edited the answer to provide a solution for what you're asking. It will read a 2d array with a variable number of rows and variable number of columns, into a0, a1 and so on.
    – Sir Athos
    May 10 '13 at 22:40
  • How would you use another delimiter such as a comma or tab?
    – MountainX
    Jul 19 '16 at 21:30
5

You can also approach this in a much less smarter fashion

q=()
q+=( 1-2 )
q+=( a-b )

for set in ${q[@]};
do
echo ${set%%-*}
echo ${set##*-}
done

of course a 22 line solution or indirection is probably the better way to go and why not sprinkle eval every where to .

3
  • Where does the 22 line solution use indirection? For your solution, what are you going to do when writing a script that requires i/o and a user wants to input a - into the 'array'. Also if you want to simulate an array probably makes more sense to echo ${set//-/ } instead of your two. Jun 25 '14 at 1:23
  • That was my mistake i missed an or . I think that ${set//-/} is probably a better way to go ( I don`t know about the portability issues of %% and ## though I believe you ) . What if is a very dangerous question , if you ask it to many times you'll find you need A.I. for your option parser :{p
    – Arcabard
    Jun 25 '14 at 1:27
  • 1
    I don't understand how that is relevant or helps answer the question. ${set//-/ } would eliminate the '-', merging the values together. i.e., the echo results in 'ab' whereas the original code returns either 'a' or 'b' depending on which side of the '-' you want. Feb 2 '19 at 14:31
5

Another approach is you can represent each row as a string, i.e. mapping the 2D array into an 1D array. Then, all you need to do is unpack and repack the row's string whenever you make an edit:

# Init a 4x5 matrix
a=("00 01 02 03 04" "10 11 12 13 14" "20 21 22 23 24" "30 31 32 33 34")

aset() {
  row=$1
  col=$2
  value=$3
  IFS=' ' read -r -a tmp <<< "${a[$row]}"
  tmp[$col]=$value
  a[$row]="${tmp[@]}"
}

# Set a[2][3] = 9999
aset 2 3 9999

# Show result
for r in "${a[@]}"; do
  echo $r
done

Outputs:

00 01 02 03 04
10 11 12 13 14
20 21 22 9999 24
30 31 32 33 34
4

A way to simulate arrays in bash (it can be adapted for any number of dimensions of an array):

#!/bin/bash

## The following functions implement vectors (arrays) operations in bash:
## Definition of a vector <v>:
##      v_0 - variable that stores the number of elements of the vector
##      v_1..v_n, where n=v_0 - variables that store the values of the vector elements

VectorAddElementNext () {
# Vector Add Element Next
# Adds the string contained in variable $2 in the next element position (vector length + 1) in vector $1

    local elem_value
    local vector_length
    local elem_name

    eval elem_value=\"\$$2\"
    eval vector_length=\$$1\_0
    if [ -z "$vector_length" ]; then
        vector_length=$((0))
    fi

    vector_length=$(( vector_length + 1 ))
    elem_name=$1_$vector_length

    eval $elem_name=\"\$elem_value\"
    eval $1_0=$vector_length
}

VectorAddElementDVNext () {
# Vector Add Element Direct Value Next
# Adds the string $2 in the next element position (vector length + 1) in vector $1

    local elem_value
    local vector_length
    local elem_name

    eval elem_value="$2"
    eval vector_length=\$$1\_0
    if [ -z "$vector_length" ]; then
        vector_length=$((0))
    fi

    vector_length=$(( vector_length + 1 ))
    elem_name=$1_$vector_length

    eval $elem_name=\"\$elem_value\"
    eval $1_0=$vector_length
}

VectorAddElement () {
# Vector Add Element
# Adds the string contained in the variable $3 in the position contained in $2 (variable or direct value) in the vector $1

    local elem_value
    local elem_position
    local vector_length
    local elem_name

    eval elem_value=\"\$$3\"
    elem_position=$(($2))
    eval vector_length=\$$1\_0
    if [ -z "$vector_length" ]; then
        vector_length=$((0))
    fi

    if [ $elem_position -ge $vector_length ]; then
        vector_length=$elem_position
    fi

    elem_name=$1_$elem_position

    eval $elem_name=\"\$elem_value\"
    if [ ! $elem_position -eq 0 ]; then
        eval $1_0=$vector_length
    fi
}

VectorAddElementDV () {
# Vector Add Element
# Adds the string $3 in the position $2 (variable or direct value) in the vector $1

    local elem_value
    local elem_position
    local vector_length
    local elem_name

    eval elem_value="$3"
    elem_position=$(($2))
    eval vector_length=\$$1\_0
    if [ -z "$vector_length" ]; then
        vector_length=$((0))
    fi

    if [ $elem_position -ge $vector_length ]; then
        vector_length=$elem_position
    fi

    elem_name=$1_$elem_position

    eval $elem_name=\"\$elem_value\"
    if [ ! $elem_position -eq 0 ]; then
        eval $1_0=$vector_length
    fi
}

VectorPrint () {
# Vector Print
# Prints all the elements names and values of the vector $1 on sepparate lines

    local vector_length

    vector_length=$(($1_0))
    if [ "$vector_length" = "0" ]; then
        echo "Vector \"$1\" is empty!"
    else
        echo "Vector \"$1\":"
        for ((i=1; i<=$vector_length; i++)); do
            eval echo \"[$i]: \\\"\$$1\_$i\\\"\"
            ###OR: eval printf \'\%s\\\n\' \"[\$i]: \\\"\$$1\_$i\\\"\"
        done
    fi
}

VectorDestroy () {
# Vector Destroy
# Empties all the elements values of the vector $1

    local vector_length

    vector_length=$(($1_0))
    if [ ! "$vector_length" = "0" ]; then
        for ((i=1; i<=$vector_length; i++)); do
            unset $1_$i
        done
        unset $1_0
    fi
}

##################
### MAIN START ###
##################

## Setting vector 'params' with all the parameters received by the script:
for ((i=1; i<=$#; i++)); do
    eval param="\${$i}"
    VectorAddElementNext params param
done

# Printing the vector 'params':
VectorPrint params

read temp

## Setting vector 'params2' with the elements of the vector 'params' in reversed order:
if [ -n "$params_0" ]; then
    for ((i=1; i<=$params_0; i++)); do
        count=$((params_0-i+1))
        VectorAddElement params2 count params_$i
    done
fi

# Printing the vector 'params2':
VectorPrint params2

read temp

## Getting the values of 'params2'`s elements and printing them:
if [ -n "$params2_0" ]; then
    echo "Printing the elements of the vector 'params2':"
    for ((i=1; i<=$params2_0; i++)); do
        eval current_elem_value=\"\$params2\_$i\"
        echo "params2_$i=\"$current_elem_value\""
    done
else
    echo "Vector 'params2' is empty!"
fi

read temp

## Creating a two dimensional array ('a'):
for ((i=1; i<=10; i++)); do
    VectorAddElement a 0 i
    for ((j=1; j<=8; j++)); do
        value=$(( 8 * ( i - 1 ) + j ))
        VectorAddElementDV a_$i $j $value
    done
done

## Manually printing the two dimensional array ('a'):
echo "Printing the two-dimensional array 'a':"
if [ -n "$a_0" ]; then
    for ((i=1; i<=$a_0; i++)); do
        eval current_vector_lenght=\$a\_$i\_0
        if [ -n "$current_vector_lenght" ]; then
            for ((j=1; j<=$current_vector_lenght; j++)); do
                eval value=\"\$a\_$i\_$j\"
                printf "$value "
            done
        fi
        printf "\n"
    done
fi

################
### MAIN END ###
################
3

2D array can be achieved in bash by declaring 1D array and then elements can be accessed using (r * col_size) + c). Below logic delcares 1D array (str_2d_arr) and prints as 2D array.

col_size=3
str_2d_arr=()
str_2d_arr+=('abc' '200' 'xyz')
str_2d_arr+=('def' '300' 'ccc')
str_2d_arr+=('aaa' '400' 'ddd')

echo "Print 2D array"
col_count=0
for elem in ${str_2d_arr[@]}; do
    if [ ${col_count} -eq ${col_size} ]; then
        echo ""
        col_count=0
    fi
    echo -e "$elem \c"
    ((col_count++))
done
echo ""

Output is

Print 2D array
abc 200 xyz 
def 300 ccc
aaa 400 ddd

Below logic is very useful to get each row from the above declared 1D array str_2d_arr.

# Get nth row and update to 2nd arg
get_row_n()
{
    row=$1
    local -n a=$2
    start_idx=$((row * col_size))
    for ((i = 0; i < ${col_size}; i++)); do
        idx=$((start_idx + i))
        a+=(${str_2d_arr[${idx}]})
    done
}

arr=()
get_row_n 0 arr
echo "Row 0"
for e in ${arr[@]}; do
    echo -e "$e \c"
done
echo ""

Output is

Row 0
abc 200 xyz
2

If each row of the matrix is the same size, then you can simply use a linear array and multiplication.

That is,

a=()
for (( i=0; i<4; ++i )); do
  for (( j=0; j<5; ++j )); do
     a[i*5+j]=0
  done
done

Then your a[2][3] = 3 becomes

a[2*5+3] = 3

This approach might be worth turning into a set of functions, but since you can't pass arrays to or return arrays from functions, you would have to use pass-by-name and sometimes eval. So I tend to file multidimensional arrays under "things bash is simply Not Meant To Do".

1

One can simply define two functions to write ($4 is the assigned value) and read a matrix with arbitrary name ($1) and indexes ($2 and $3) exploiting eval and indirect referencing.

#!/bin/bash

matrix_write () {
 eval $1"_"$2"_"$3=$4
 # aux=$1"_"$2"_"$3          # Alternative way
 # let $aux=$4               # ---
}

matrix_read () {
 aux=$1"_"$2"_"$3
 echo ${!aux}
}

for ((i=1;i<10;i=i+1)); do
 for ((j=1;j<10;j=j+1)); do 
  matrix_write a $i $j $[$i*10+$j]
 done
done

for ((i=1;i<10;i=i+1)); do
 for ((j=1;j<10;j=j+1)); do 
  echo "a_"$i"_"$j"="$(matrix_read a $i $j)
 done
done
1
  • 2
    Hi, do add a bit of explanation along with the code as it helps to understand your code. Code only answers are frowned upon.
    – Bhargav Rao
    Sep 10 '16 at 18:17
0

For simulating a 2-dimensional array, I first load the first n-elements (the elements of the first column)

local pano_array=()  

i=0

for line in $(grep  "filename" "$file")
do 
  url=$(extract_url_from_xml $line)
  pano_array[i]="$url"
  i=$((i+1))
done

To add the second column, I define the size of the first column and calculate the values in an offset variable

array_len="${#pano_array[@]}"

i=0

while [[ $i -lt $array_len ]]
do
  url="${pano_array[$i]}"
  offset=$(($array_len+i)) 
  found_file=$(get_file $url)
  pano_array[$offset]=$found_file

  i=$((i+1))
done
0

The below code will definitely work provided if you are working on a Mac you have bash version 4. Not only can you declare 0 but this is more of a universal approach to dynamically accepting values.

2D Array

declare -A arr
echo "Enter the row"
read r
echo "Enter the column"
read c
i=0
j=0
echo "Enter the elements"
while [ $i -lt $r ]
do
  j=0
  while [ $j -lt $c ]
  do
    echo $i $j
    read m
    arr[${i},${j}]=$m
    j=`expr $j + 1`
  done
  i=`expr $i + 1`
done

i=0
j=0
while [ $i -lt $r ]
do
  j=0
  while [ $j -lt $c ]
  do
    echo -n ${arr[${i},${j}]} " "
    j=`expr $j + 1`
  done
  echo ""
  i=`expr $i + 1`
done
0

Mark Reed suggested a very good solution for 2D arrays (matrix)! They always can be converted in a 1D array (vector). Although Bash doesn't have a native support for 2D arrays, it's not that hard to create a simple ADT around the mentioned principle.

Here is a barebone example with no argument checks, etc, just to keep the solution clear: the array's size is set as two first elements in the instance (documentation for the Bash module that implements a matrix ADT, https://github.com/vorakl/bash-libs/blob/master/src.docs/content/pages/matrix.rst )

#!/bin/bash

matrix_init() {
    # matrix_init instance x y data ...

    declare -n self=$1                                                          
    declare -i width=$2 height=$3                                                
    shift 3;                                                                    

    self=(${width} ${height} "$@")                                               
}                                                                               

matrix_get() {                                                                  
    # matrix_get instance x y

    declare -n self=$1                                                          
    declare -i x=$2 y=$3                                                        
    declare -i width=${self[0]} height=${self[1]}                                

    echo "${self[2+y*width+x]}"                                                 
}                                                                               

matrix_set() {                                                                  
    # matrix_set instance x y data

    declare -n self=$1                                                          
    declare -i x=$2 y=$3                                                        
    declare data="$4"                                                           
    declare -i width=${self[0]} height=${self[1]}                                

    self[2+y*width+x]="${data}"                                                 
}                                                                               

matrix_destroy() {                                                                     
    # matrix_destroy instance

    declare -n self=$1                                                          
    unset self                                                                  
}

# my_matrix[3][2]=( (one, two, three), ("1 1" "2 2" "3 3") )
matrix_init my_matrix \                                                         
        3 2 \                                                               
        one two three \                                                     
        "1 1" "2 2" "3 3"

# print my_matrix[2][0]
matrix_get my_matrix 2 0

# print my_matrix[1][1]
matrix_get my_matrix 1 1

# my_matrix[1][1]="4 4 4"
matrix_set my_matrix 1 1 "4 4 4"                                                

# print my_matrix[1][1]
matrix_get my_matrix 1 1                                                        

# remove my_matrix
matrix_destroy my_matrix

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.