1

I found a wiki page about how to calculate the depth of a list: http://wiki.tcl.tk/11602

How can I rewrite the above code as a single proc using tcl 8.6 features lmap and apply? Perhaps "apply" is not really needed.

proc max list {
    set res [lindex $list 0]
    foreach e [lrange $list 1 end] {if {$e>$res} {set res $e}}
    set res
}

# llmap perhaps can be replaced with lmap from Tcl 8.6
proc llmap {func list} {
    set res {}
    foreach e $list {lappend res [$func $e]}
    set res
 }

proc ldepth list {
    expr {
        [llength $list] == 0? 1:
        [expr {[lindex $list 0] eq $list}]?       0:
           1+[max [llmap ldepth $list]]
    }
 }
5

The first level of adaptation already gets us close to where you want to go, sufficiently so that this is what I'd consider as a production solution:

proc ldepth {list} {
    expr {
        [llength $list] == 0 ? 1 :
        [lindex $list 0] eq $list ? 0 :
        1 + [tcl::mathfunc::max {*}[lmap e $list {
            ldepth $e
        }]]
    }
}

This uses the standard lmap and tcl::mathfunc::max (which is the implementation of the max() function). Note that expansion and tcl::mathfunc::max are features of Tcl 8.5, but they're very useful here.

Eliminating expansion

Let's see if we can get rid of that call to tcl::mathfunc::max with the expansion.

proc ldepth {list} {
    set m -inf
    expr {
        [llength $list] == 0 ? 1 :
        [lindex $list 0] eq $list ? 0 :
        1 + [lindex [lmap e $list {
            set m [expr { max($m, [ldepth $e]) }]
        }] end]
    }
}

Hmm, that's just a touch ugly. We might as well do this:

proc ldepth {list} {
    set m -inf
    expr {
        [llength $list] == 0 ? 1 :
        [lindex $list 0] eq $list ? 0 :
        [foreach e $list {
             set m [expr { max($m,[ldepth $e]) }]
         }
         expr {$m + 1}]
    }
}

This definitely isn't getting better, except in that it doesn't keep so much state around (just a running maximum, not a list of depths). Let's go back to the version with lmap! (What is really needed for true beauty is lfold, but that didn't get done on the grounds that sometimes you've just got to stop adding features and call a release.)

“Eliminating” recursion

The other way we can go is to see about removing the outer recursion. We can't completely eliminate the recursion altogether — we're dealing with a recursive operation over a recursive structure — but we don't need to put it in the outer level where a rename ldepth fred will cause problems. We do this by using apply to create an internal procedure-like thing, and since we're doing recursive calls, we pass the lambda term into itself. (There are tricks you can do to get that value without explicitly passing it in, but they're ugly and we might as well be honest here.)

proc ldepth {list} {
    set ldepth {{ldepth list} {expr {
        [llength $list] == 0 ? 1 :
        [lindex $list 0] eq $list ? 0 :
        1 + [tcl::mathfunc::max {*}[lmap e $list {
            apply $ldepth $ldepth $e
        }]]
    }}
    apply $ldepth $ldepth $list
}

Full-bytecode version

Subject to still doing a recursive call.

proc ldepth {list} {
    expr {
        [llength $list] == 0 ? [return 1] :
        [lindex $list 0] eq $list ? [return 0] :
        [set m -inf
         foreach e $list {
             set m [expr {[set d [ldepth $e]]+1>$m ? $d+1 : $m}]
         }
         return $m]
    }
}

Fully recursion-free by using a work queue instead. This is 8.5 code — no 8.6 features required — and you could write this to be 8.4-suitable by replacing the lassigns:

proc ldepth {list} {
    set work [list $list 0]
    set maxdepth 0
    while {[llength $work]} {
        ### 8.4 version
        # foreach {list depth} $work break
        # set work [lrange $work 2 end]
        set work [lassign $work[unset -nocomplain work] list depth]
        if {[llength $list] == 0} {
            incr depth
        } elseif {[lindex $list 0] ne $list} {
            incr depth
            foreach e $list {
                lappend work $e $depth
            }
            continue
        }
        set maxdepth [expr {$maxdepth<$depth ? $depth : $maxdepth}]
    }
    return $maxdepth
}

The moral of the story? The 8.6 features don't make sense for everything.

0

Here's a simple one that works. It just flattens the list until it can't be flattened any further. The number of attempts is the depth. No recursion needed.

proc ldepth {lst} {
    set depth 1
    set fatter $lst
    set flatter [join $fatter]
    while {$flatter ne $fatter} {
        set fatter $flatter
        set flatter [join $fatter]
        incr depth
    }
    return depth
}

Hope this helps!

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