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How can I use modulo operator (%) in calculation of numbers for JavaScript projects?

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It's the remainder operator and is used to get the remainder after integer division. Lots of languages have it. For example:

10 % 3 // = 1 ; because 3 * 3 gets you 9, and 10 - 9 is 1.

Apparently it is not the same as the modulo operator entirely.

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    You can fit 3 exactly 3 times in 9. If you would add 3 one more time to 9, you would end up with 12. But you were dividing 10, so instead you say it's 3 times 9 with the remainder being 1. That's what modulo gets you. – MarioDS May 12 '13 at 8:38
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    I think it is better to explain it this way: Modulo is the difference left when dividing a value. You can use this to calculate listing lists with items, for example: 10 % 10 gives you 0. When it is 0 you know there a 10 items in a list. For example 20 % 10 gives you the same value, 0, another 10 items in a list...... – Codebeat Mar 5 '14 at 6:43
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    There is no "integer division" operator in JS AFAIK; 10 / 3 will result in 3.333.... You need to truncate the fraction, for instance by using Math.floor(). – Lucero Aug 20 '14 at 17:02
  • @Lucero you're right, I never realised that! I just assumed it used the same basic operator available in many languages. – MarioDS Aug 20 '14 at 17:31
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    @MDeSchaepmeester, well it kind of is using the same basic operator as in other languages, but it lacks a specific integer primitive. JS natively only has "number" primitives which are floating-point, and thus there also are no integer-only operators. – Lucero Aug 20 '14 at 21:07
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That would be the modulo operator, which produces the remainder of the division of two numbers.

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    In C-like languages, including JavaScript, % is the remainder operator, not modulo/modulus. They are equivalent for positive values, but different for negative ones. – Aaron Franke Jun 4 '19 at 4:34
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    downvoting this answer as it doesn't add anything useful to this conversation. – Peter Nov 20 '19 at 17:43

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