56

I have a structure like this:

var myMap = {
    partnr1: ['modelA', 'modelB', 'modelC'],
    partnr2: ['modelA', 'modelB', 'modelC']
};

I am going to iterate through each of the elements (partnr) with their associatives (models).

I am trying a double $each iteration in order to achieve this, but nothing happens:

$.each(myMap, function (i, val) {
    $.each(i, function (innerKey, innerValue) {

        setTimeout(function () {
            $('#variant').fadeOut("slow", function () {
                $(this).text(innerKey + "-" + innerValue).fadeIn("slow");

            });

        }, i * 6000);

    });
});

The effect with fading in and out that I am trying to achieve is working fine when using a single value array (Object), but not when I need to have more than one value for each key like here.

Any ideas of how to accomplish this iteration succesfully and are there other ways than using a map that would be better in this case ?

Any suggestions would be of interest.

1
  • 3
    This is not a Map, but an Object. – John Weisz Sep 10 '16 at 8:54
84

An answer to your Question from 2019:

It depends on what version of ECMAScript you use.

Pre ES6:

Use any of the answers below, e.g.:

for (var m in myMap){
    for (var i=0;i<myMap[m].length;i++){
    ... do something with myMap[m][i] ...
    }
} 

For ES6 (ES 2015):

You should use a Map object, which has the entries() function:

var myMap = new Map();
myMap.set("0", "foo");
myMap.set(1, "bar");
myMap.set({}, "baz");

for (const [key, value] of myMap.entries()) {
  console.log(key, value);
}

For ES8 (ES 2017):

Object.entries() was introduced:

const object = {'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c' : 3};
for (const [key, value] of Object.entries(object)) {
  console.log(key, value);
}
2
  • I want to ask a stupid question, why use the ES8 when end User could be on an older browser? – Erik Feb 22 at 14:52
  • 4
    @Erik: JS development also happens in fields other than web development. There, you may not have to worry about older browser version and can enjoy the improvements ES8 brings. – David Schumann Mar 1 at 11:30
39

I'd use standard javascript:

for (var m in myMap){
    for (var i=0;i<myMap[m].length;i++){
    ... do something with myMap[m][i] ...
    }
} 

Note the different ways of treating objects and arrays.

3
  • 1
    Why? And you omitted the necessary closure… – Bergi May 12 '13 at 14:16
  • It's quicker and in my opinion cleaner. And I skipped the rest because it's unclear to me what it's supposed to do. What is #variant? What should #variant end up doing? – Atle May 12 '13 at 14:23
  • #variant is an id of a div that is going to be showed (faded in) with the info from the map. For each partnr there should be faded in a list with the corrensponding models. – user2374903 May 12 '13 at 14:57
24

Functional Approach for ES6+

If you want to take a more functional approach to iterating over the Map object, you can do something like this

const myMap = new Map() 
myMap.forEach((value, key) => {
    console.log(value, key)
})
4

The callback to $.each() is passed the property name and the value, in that order. You're therefore trying to iterate over the property names in the inner call to $.each(). I think you want:

$.each(myMap, function (i, val) {
  $.each(val, function(innerKey, innerValue) {
    // ...
  });
});

In the inner loop, given an object like your map, the values are arrays. That's OK, but note that the "innerKey" values will all be numbers.

edit — Now once that's straightened out, here's the next problem:

    setTimeout(function () {

      // ...

    }, i * 6000);

The first time through that loop, "i" will be the string "partnr1". Thus, that multiplication attempt will result in a NaN. You can keep an external counter to keep track of the property count of the outer map:

var pcount = 1;
$.each(myMap, function(i, val) {
  $.each(val, function(innerKey, innerValue) {
    setTimeout(function() {
      // ...
    }, pcount++ * 6000);
  });
});
4
  • Thank you for the reply. By changing $.each(i... to $.each(val.. my code above is working in the way that its showing a result. But unfortunally its only showing the last result from the map, so its jumping straight to the final iteration. – user2374903 May 12 '13 at 14:10
  • @user2374903 no, it's not jumping to the last one, though it appears to be doing so. I hadn't looked closely at the "setTimeout" call, so I'll add to my answer. – Pointy May 12 '13 at 14:16
  • By changing the pcount from 1 to 0 (which means it starts from the first loop) the code worked, but only as showing the models one by one. My mistake for not making this clear, the goal is to get all the models that correspond to that partnumer showing as a list beeing faded in. – user2374903 May 12 '13 at 15:03
1

Don't use iterators to do this. Maintain your own loop by incrementing a counter in the callback, and recursively calling the operation on the next item.

$.each(myMap, function(_, arr) {
    processArray(arr, 0);
});

function processArray(arr, i) {
    if (i >= arr.length) return;

    setTimeout(function () {
        $('#variant').fadeOut("slow", function () {
            $(this).text(i + "-" + arr[i]).fadeIn("slow");

            // Handle next iteration
            processArray(arr, ++i);
        });
    }, 6000);
}

Though there's a logic error in your code. You're setting the same container to more than one different value at (roughly) the same time. Perhaps you mean for each one to update its own container.

5
  • Thank you for the suggestion. I've tried you code, but you 're right about thats there 's a problem with the container. The code below works though, but here its only a single value array: – user2374903 May 12 '13 at 14:21
  • This looks like a nice way to do it. – Pointy May 12 '13 at 14:22
  • $.each(jArray, function(i, val) { setTimeout(function() { $('#reklame2').fadeOut("slow", function() { $(this).text(val).fadeIn("slow"); }); $('#reklame17').fadeOut("slow", function() { $(this).text(val).fadeIn("slow"); }); }, i * 6000); }); – user2374903 May 12 '13 at 14:23
  • @user2374903: What is the intention? Should each partnr update a separate container, or are they all meant to run in sequence? Or should it be partnr1[0] -> partnr2[0] -> partnr1[1] -> partnr2[1] -> etc – user1106925 May 12 '13 at 14:24
  • Sorry for not making clear the object for the iteration. For each time the partnr shows up ALL the corrensponding models are going to be faded in as a list in that moment. – user2374903 May 12 '13 at 14:54
1

Well, it looks like this old JQuery thread has been coopted by ES6 Map users.

If this is what you're looking for, may I suggest using the Array.from() function which converts the Map to an Array. This allows you to easily chain transforms such as filter(), map(), etc.

const map = new Map([
  ['key one', 'value one'],
  ['key two', 'value two'],
]);

// Loop through key-value-pairs
Array.from(map.entries()).map(([key, val]) => console.log(key, val));

// Loop through map keys
Array.from(map.keys()).map(key => console.log(key));

// Loop through values
Array.from(map.values()).map(value => console.log(value));

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