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Below is a class using the singleton design pattern:

class Singleton
{
    private static Singleton instance;
    private Singleton()
    {
        ...
    }

    public static synchronized Singleton getInstance()
    {
        if (instance == null)
            instance = new Singleton();

        return instance;
    }
    ...
    public void doSomething()
    {
        ... 
    }
}

I wanted to know some design issues about the above class? Why is the instance variable instance private and static. I understand that being private make the instance variable accessible only to object of that specific class but how does it help?

marked as duplicate by NINCOMPOOP, ollo, ldav1s, john.k.doe, flavian May 13 '13 at 0:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Added Java since I'm not aware of the synchronized keyword in c#. – Andy May 12 '13 at 15:31
  • Do you really need to instantiate it lazy? – NilsH May 12 '13 at 15:33
  • @NoobUnChained i disagree this is a dup. He's asking if there is anything wrong with this particular implementation, not what abuses of singleton could come about. – Andy May 12 '13 at 15:36

If it was public, everybody could use Singleton.instance and would complain because it's null. Making it private forces them to use getInstance(), which guarantees to return a non-null instance.

If it wasn't static, it would be an instance variable of Singleton, and you would thus need a Singleton instance to access the unique Singleton instance which doesn't make much sense.

  • Deleted........ – Andy May 12 '13 at 15:32

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