43

How can I quickly get signal name from its number? There is strsignal(), but I just want the name, e.g. SIGUSR1

In other words, if we have macros like SIGUSR1 -> 12 do we have anything like 12 -> SIGUSR1 ?

7
  • 3
    In my /usr/include/sys/signal.h, all of the signal names are just #defined constants. That means the preprocessor has already replaced them with constant integers by the time the compiler runs - the symbolic name doesn't exist as far as the program is concerned. What exactly are you trying to do here?
    – Carl Norum
    May 12, 2013 at 16:37
  • @CarlNorum, nothing special, just fancy output. I thought the actual names could be stored somewhere else so I could get them.
    – Mike Roll
    May 12, 2013 at 16:42
  • 1
    If you want "fancy output", isn't that exactly what strsignal is for?
    – Carl Norum
    May 12, 2013 at 16:43
  • 1
    Yeah it's fancy but not the way I want it :) Just curious, not an issue at all.
    – Mike Roll
    May 12, 2013 at 16:46
  • 3
    My strsignal man page says you can get the names directly from sys_signame.
    – Carl Norum
    May 12, 2013 at 16:48

5 Answers 5

29

My strsignal(3) man page says you can get the names directly from the sys_signame array. Here's a simple example program I wrote to test it:

#include <signal.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>

void upcase(char *s)
{
    while (*s)
    {
        *s = toupper(*s);
        s++;        
    }
}

int main(void)
{    
    for (int sig = 1; sig < NSIG; sig++)
    {
        char *str = strdup(sys_signame[sig]);
        if (!str)
            return -1;

        upcase(str);
        printf("%2d -> SIG%s\n", sig, str);

        free(str);
    }

    return 0;
}

I think this program produces the output you're looking for:

$ ./example 
 1 -> SIGHUP
 2 -> SIGINT
 3 -> SIGQUIT
 4 -> SIGILL
 5 -> SIGTRAP
 6 -> SIGABRT
 7 -> SIGEMT
 8 -> SIGFPE
 9 -> SIGKILL
10 -> SIGBUS
11 -> SIGSEGV
12 -> SIGSYS
13 -> SIGPIPE
14 -> SIGALRM
15 -> SIGTERM
16 -> SIGURG
17 -> SIGSTOP
18 -> SIGTSTP
19 -> SIGCONT
20 -> SIGCHLD
21 -> SIGTTIN
22 -> SIGTTOU
23 -> SIGIO
24 -> SIGXCPU
25 -> SIGXFSZ
26 -> SIGVTALRM
27 -> SIGPROF
28 -> SIGWINCH
29 -> SIGINFO
30 -> SIGUSR1
31 -> SIGUSR2
3
  • 8
    Only strsignal seems to be defined by POSIX it seems, array declarations like sys_signame seem to be extension. May 12, 2013 at 20:53
  • 2
    So this is perhaps an answer to the problem the OP has if he's on OS X, but not an answer to the question as it is formulated. May 13, 2013 at 6:24
  • 1
    ⁺¹, but note that array name was probably changed — it's sys_siglist.
    – Hi-Angel
    Oct 16, 2018 at 14:10
7

glib 2.32 (released on 2020-08-05) introduced the function sigabbrev_np(int). Since that version you cannot use sys_siglist[] anymore too.

From man strsignal:

The sigabbrev_np() function returns the abbreviated name of the signal, sig. For example, given the value SIGINT, it returns the string "INT".
[...]
sigdescr_np() and sigdabbrev_np() first appeared in glibc 2.32. Starting with version 2.32, the sys_siglist symbol is no longer exported by glibc.

And from the release notes:

The functions sigabbrev_np and sigdescr_np have been added. The sigabbrev_np returns the abbreviated signal name (e.g. "HUP" for SIGHUP) [...] both functions return NULL for an invalid signal number.

They should be used instead of sys_siglist or sys_sigabbrev and they are both thread and async-signal safe. These functions are GNU extensions.

3

As Jens Gustedt pointed out in comments years ago, sys_signame and sys_siglist are not portable.

Since this question is tagged [unix], you can most portably #ifdef your way to a mapping of names and numeric values specific to your environment. Something like:

//
//  const char * signame(int s)
//
//    return the name of the given signal number as a string,
//    or NULL if the number is unrecognized.
//
#define _POSIX_C_SOURCE 200809L
#include <signal.h>

#define SIGNAMEANDNUM(s)  { #s, s }

static struct {
  const char *name,
  int value,
} known_signals[] = {
  SIGNAMEANDNUM(SIGABRT),   // get the POSIX signals
  SIGNAMEANDNUM(SIGALRM),
  SIGNAMEANDNUM(SIGBUS),
  SIGNAMEANDNUM(SIGCHLD),
  /* ... */
  SIGNAMEANDNUM(SIGXFSZ),
#ifdef SIGUNUSUAL           // get nonstandard signals 
  SIGNAMEANDNUM(SIGUNUSUAL),
#endif
  /* ... */
};

const char *
signame(int s) {
  const char *name = NULL;

  for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(known_signals)/sizeof(*known_signals); i++) {
    if (s == known_signals[i].value) {
      name = known_signals[i].name;
      break;
    }
  }

  return name;
}

This requires some a priori knowledge of you platform, of course.

1

Tested the below code on Ubuntu 22.04 and it works fine.

#include <signal.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>

extern const char * const sys_siglist[];

void upcase(char *s)
{
    while (*s)
    {
        *s = toupper(*s);
        s++;
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    int sig;
   /*
    * NSIG returns the number of signals available in a system and it 
    * may vary according to platform; Found on Ubuntu-22.04 it returns 
    * 65 whereas in MIPS it is 31; Found in both platforms it leads to 
    * a core dump after signal 31 so limiting scanning of signal till 
    * 31 instead of using NSIG.
    */
    for (sig = 1; sig < 32; sig++)
    {
        char *str = strdup(strsignal(sig));
        if (!str)
            return -1;

        upcase(str);
        printf("%2d -> %s\n", sig, str);

        free(str);
    }

    return 0;
}

The output of the above code on Ubuntu-22.04 (Intel x86_64 GNU/Linux):

 1 -> HANGUP
 2 -> INTERRUPT
 3 -> QUIT
 4 -> ILLEGAL INSTRUCTION
 5 -> TRACE/BREAKPOINT TRAP
 6 -> ABORTED
 7 -> BUS ERROR
 8 -> FLOATING POINT EXCEPTION
 9 -> KILLED
10 -> USER DEFINED SIGNAL 1
11 -> SEGMENTATION FAULT
12 -> USER DEFINED SIGNAL 2
13 -> BROKEN PIPE
14 -> ALARM CLOCK
15 -> TERMINATED
16 -> STACK FAULT
17 -> CHILD EXITED
18 -> CONTINUED
19 -> STOPPED (SIGNAL)
20 -> STOPPED
21 -> STOPPED (TTY INPUT)
22 -> STOPPED (TTY OUTPUT)
23 -> URGENT I/O CONDITION
24 -> CPU TIME LIMIT EXCEEDED
25 -> FILE SIZE LIMIT EXCEEDED
26 -> VIRTUAL TIMER EXPIRED
27 -> PROFILING TIMER EXPIRED
28 -> WINDOW CHANGED
29 -> I/O POSSIBLE
30 -> POWER FAILURE
31 -> BAD SYSTEM CALL
2
  • 1
    but there's no SIGHANGUP or SIGINTERRUPT, they're SIGHUP and SIGINT. The ones with spaces are even more obviously wrong. The only that's right here is SIGQUIT...
    – ilkkachu
    Oct 13, 2021 at 17:41
  • @ikkachu since I was adding a SIG keyword in my printf statement it was printing it like that. I have modified the code and removed that extra string keyword to reflect the correct output.
    – Ankit Raj
    Apr 1 at 8:42
-2

May be, you can declare a global array, like this

char *signame[]={"INVALID", "SIGHUP", "SIGINT", "SIGQUIT", "SIGILL", "SIGTRAP", "SIGABRT", "SIGBUS", "SIGFPE", "SIGKILL", "SIGUSR1", "SIGSEGV", "SIGUSR2", "SIGPIPE", "SIGALRM", "SIGTERM", "SIGSTKFLT", "SIGCHLD", "SIGCONT", "SIGSTOP", "SIGTSTP", "SIGTTIN", "SIGTTOU", "SIGURG", "SIGXCPU", "SIGXFSZ", "SIGVTALRM", "SIGPROF", "SIGWINCH", "SIGPOLL", "SIGPWR", "SIGSYS", NULL};

and can use it to print signal name in signal handler, like

void sig_handler(int signum){
     printf("Received signal : %s\n", signame[signum]);
}
2
  • 4
    This is a bad idea because most signal numbers are implementation-dependent. SIGKILL is always 9 but not all signals have fixed numbers like that. Nov 3, 2016 at 20:21
  • but it is nice to have to use in a signal handler since strsignal is not signal-safe
    – SRombauts
    Jan 4, 2018 at 10:24

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