1

I've asked a couple of people what the issue is, and have walked away twice without a solution. I haven't played with batch much before, so it may be a simple mistake. The code is currently supposed to give a list of processes using wmic. Eventually, I'd like to set it up to kill processes (which I should be able to do fairly easily), but I have to get over this roadblock first.

@echo off
set getprocesslistlocal=wmic process get name,processid
set /P remotemachinecheck=Type the name of the remote machine to view processes of (or type local for local machine), and press Enter.
if %remotemachinecheck%==local
(
%getprocesslistlocal%
) else (
set remotemachine=%remotemachinecheck%
set /P remoteuser=Type the user name to access %remotemachine% with, then press Enter.
set /P remotepassword=[Type the password for %remoteuser% on %remotemachine%, then press Enter. Watch your back, it won't be hidden!
set getprocesslistremote=wmic /node %remotemachine% /user:%remoteuser% /password:%remotepass% process get name,processid
%getprocesslistremote%
)
echo End of list. Press any key to choose process to kill.
@echo off
pause>null
0

First thing you do is comment out the @echo off (or change it to @echo on) so that you can see exactly which line is causing the error.


Second thing you should look at is the fact that commands are processed for substitutions before they're executed, not lines.

That means the entire if ( ) else ( ) structure will have substitution done on it before the remotemachine variable is set, meaning it won't be set to what you want, when you want to use it.

For example, this code:

@echo off
set xyzzy=plugh
if a==a (
    set xyzzy=twisty
    echo %xyzzy%
)

will not output twisty as you may think, but instead gives you plugh.

You need to look into delayed expansion and the !! expansion operator:

@setlocal enableextensions enabledelayedexpansion
@echo off
set xyzzy=plugh
if a==a (
    set xyzzy=twisty
    echo !xyzzy!
)
endlocal

Third thing, and I suspect this is what's causing your immediate problem, move the ( to the end of the if line:

if %remotemachinecheck%==local (

With the ( on the following line, it generates an error like:

The syntax of the command is incorrect.

but here's the tricky thing: it outputs that before the if line, which may lead you to believe the error is on the previous line, as per the following transcript (indenting the lines generated by the computer):

c:\pax> type qq1.cmd
    set q=w
    if a==a
    (
        echo yes
    )

c:\pax> qq1

    c>\pax> set q=w
    The syntax of the command is incorrect.

    c:\pax> if a==a

c:\pax> type qq2.cmd
    set q=w
    if a==a (
        echo yes
    )

c:\pax> qq2

    c>\pax> set q=w

    c:\pax> if a==a (echo equal )
    equal
  • or change @echo off to @echo on. – user2033427 May 14 '13 at 5:21
  • @user2033427, that's probably safer if a user has customised the command shell to make echo off the default (such as with cmd /q) but I've never seen this in the wild. Still it's a valid option so I'll incorporate it into the answer. – paxdiablo May 14 '13 at 5:24
  • Even when I've modified the code to use just remotemachine (no duplicated variables that change), I still have the issue, so I believe it's a something different. Though I do appreciate the heads-up on that, as it would clearly have been an issue as well. – EpicCyndaquil May 14 '13 at 6:12
  • @Epic: and, when you turned on the echo, which line exactly showed the problem? – paxdiablo May 14 '13 at 6:13
  • I had turned off the echo previously, @paxdiablo. It informs me of a syntax error after it recieves input from set /P remotemachine=Type the name of the remote machine to view processes of (or type local for local machine), and press Enter.. – EpicCyndaquil May 14 '13 at 6:14

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