4

I have come across a case where I need to make a design decision (not so much for the program itself, but for learning what others do in the situation, it would be best to look at this as though it was going to be an API). I have an Enum Class:

public enum Type
{

    CAPTAIN(2),  // Only Use CalcMorale never other
    LEADER(5),   // Only use CalcMorale never other
    PARTIER(80); // Only use CalcMorale2 never other

    int calcMorale(int inMorale)
    {
        return inMorale * (100 + morale) / 100;
    }

    int calcMorale2(int inMorale, int teamCount)
    {
        return inMorale + morale * teamCount;
    }

    int morale;

    private Type(int aMor)
    {
        morale = aMor;
    }

}

There is a class Character that holds one of these enums and is also the one passing in parameters.

The problem as commented, is that I only want certain enums to use certain methods inside the enum class. A leader adds 5 percent to the team morale, but a partier adds 80 for each member inside that party thus requiring another parameter. I could solve the problem a few ways, but would like to know the general consensus of the community on how they'd go about it.

I could:

Make it the programmers responsibility to call the right method. (This sounds wrong to me).

Give each enum it's own version of the function. (This would make a massive file, and I would be repeating A LOT of code).

Leave responsibility to 'Character' class which has a method with a switch processing this. (This means a programmer could change the calculations and not intended). This would however cause less problems if I wanted to move the enums to a file later instead. However I question if this would be breaking encapsulation if this should solely be the enums responsibility.

Make Type a class and define methods via anonymous inner classes. In this case, classes will added to a map, as opposed to having a getByName() in the enum class.

--

What would you consider to be most appropriate? (I prefer my classes to be as self dependent as possible as though I was using an API (it won't be), and how/would your suggestion be affected depending on the amount of enums? And what about a case where I wanted an enum to be able to use both methods? The language is Java.

2
  • They are different beasts (different method signatures), so you shouldn't try to cram them together into one class.
    – Bohemian
    Commented May 14, 2013 at 14:03
  • @Bohemian Well by separating them, I could not have a single 'Type' member in the character class. But instead would have to go with an inheritance type structure which would not be preferable at all. You also agree that hoaz's method would be the correct solution, is that not cramming them together also? Commented May 14, 2013 at 14:13

3 Answers 3

3

Like you said, you have to think about how your application is going to handle this. If you want the enum class to handle this itself, you will need some sort of conditional and some form of overloading (which means that the developers will be responsible for calling the right methods anyway.

However you could force the developers to always send teamcount regardless:

public enum Type {
    CAPTAIN(2),
    LEADER(5),
    PARTIER(80);

    private final int morale;

    private Type(int m){
        morale = m;
    }

    public int getMorale(int inMorale) {
         return getMorale (inMorale, 0);
    }

    public int getMorale(int inMorale, int teamCount) {
        switch (this) {
            case CAPTAIN:       
            case LEADER:
                return inMorale * (100 + morale) / 100;
            case PARTIER:
                return inMorale + morale * teamCount;
        }
        return 0;
    }
}

EDIT: changed switch to 'this'

4
  • This would probably be the most ideal solution IMO so far, thanks. But again this leaves the responsibility to call the right method in the programmers hands which is not so much a problem as they can't break anything with proper checks. Commented May 14, 2013 at 14:05
  • +1 - although I'd suggest changing the switch from morale to this, and switching on the enum type instead (in case two or more morales match up/is more readable/quicker).
    – ddmps
    Commented May 14, 2013 at 14:06
  • @RickTaemen However you do it when calling getMorale() you'll need to specify teamCount when it's a PARTIER to get the right amount. The easy way to overcome this is to demand it even if it won't be used by the calculation.
    – ddmps
    Commented May 14, 2013 at 14:08
  • @Pescic That seems appropriate, there can't be a perfect way to do everything I suppose (without causing a mess of code that is). I can't +1 without reputation, but +1 :) Commented May 14, 2013 at 14:17
1

You can pass and store multiple parameters to Enum values:

public enum Type
{

    CAPTAIN(2, true),  // Only Use CalcMorale never other
    LEADER(5, true),   // Only use CalcMorale never other
    PARTIER(80, false); // Only use CalcMorale2 never other
    ...

    int morale;
    boolean useFirstMethod;

    ...

    int calcMorale(int inMorale, int teamCount)
    {
        if (useFirstMethod) {
            return inMorale * (100 + morale) / 100;
        } else {
            return inMorale + morale * teamCount;
        }
    }

    ...
}
7
  • You'll need to get teamCount in at calcMorale() - there lies the main problem as I see it.
    – ddmps
    Commented May 14, 2013 at 13:51
  • @hoaz In that case, teamCount would be undefined. Thanks for the reply nevertheless. Commented May 14, 2013 at 13:52
  • You are right, I missed that part, I'll add second parameter that is not used in first routine, but I don't like this solution anymore
    – hoaz
    Commented May 14, 2013 at 13:53
  • +1 this is the right approach. But both fields should be final. and the else is redundant - just have if(X) return A; return B;
    – Bohemian
    Commented May 14, 2013 at 13:56
  • Also, this won't work for more than two versions of the method. Commented May 14, 2013 at 13:58
1

Make it the programmers responsibility to call the right method. (This sounds wrong to me).

You're right, that would not be an optimal solution.

Give each enum it's own version of the function. (This would make a massive file, and I would be repeating A LOT of code)

This sounds like an extension of the first option: now the caller is responsible for sorting out which of n methods to call for n enum values.

Rather than enums, consider an inheritance approach:

The methods calcMorale and calcMorale2 are very similar, and can be combined in an interface:

public interface Type
{
    int calcMorale(int inMorale);
}

This abstract class can define your common calcMorale functionality (others will override it when necessary).

public abstract class AbstractType
{
    protected final int morale;

    public AbstractType(int morale)
    {
        this.morale = morale;
    }

    int calcMorale(int inMorale)
    {
        return inMorale * (100 + morale) / 100;
    }
}

Captain and Leader extend directly from AbstractType

public class Captain extends AbstractType
{
    public Captain()
    {
        super(2);
    }
}

public class Leader extends AbstractType
{
    public Leader()
    {
        super(5);
    }
}

But the Partier overrides the calcMorale method (the second parameter is passed as a constructor argument)

public class Partier extends AbstractType
{
    private final int teamCount;

    public Partier(int teamCount)
    {
        super(80);
        this.teamCount = teamCount;
    }

    @Override
    public int calcMorale(int inMorale)
    {
        return inMorale + morale * teamCount;
    }
}
3
  • Thanks for the suggestion. However, while this approach would work. I'm concerned that as the amount of classes needed to extend AbstractType grow large (Say 1000), this would be a very tedious approach, and make file size large, while changing very little in each class. Commented May 14, 2013 at 14:00
  • @RickTaemen You could have one massive file that combines all the logic, or you could separate your logic into bite size, easy to understand chunks. If you really are going to have 1000 different ways of calculating morale, trying to maintain a massive case-switch might be equally tedious. Also, each time you need to add a new Type, you'll have to edit the massive enum class. On the other hand, you could just add a new class; other people working with your code might not be able to edit the enum.
    – kuporific
    Commented May 14, 2013 at 14:16
  • That's a valid point indeed, especially on the part about not being able to access/edit the enum. While this is a small enough project and there wouldn't be much mess at all, I'm definitely going to keep this in mind for future larger projects, where this could be the better solution. +1 When I can. However, for the fact that I can allow switchs to flow through multiple values, presumably reduced overhead of multiple classes, and the higher consensus on that method, the other answer will remain accepted. Commented May 14, 2013 at 14:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.