49

I have created a 2 dimension array like:

rows =3
columns= 2
mylist = [[0 for x in range(columns)] for x in range(rows)]
for i in range(rows):
    for j in range(columns):
        mylist[i][j] = '%s,%s'%(i,j)
print mylist

Printing this list gives an output:

[  ['0,0', '0,1'], ['1,0', '1,1'], ['2,0', '2,1']   ]

where each list item is a string of the format 'row,column'

Now given this list, i want to iterate through it in the order:

'0,0'
'1,0'
'2,0'
'0,1'
'1,1'
'2,1'

that is iterate through 1st column then 2nd column and so on. How do i do it with a loop ?

This Question pertains to pure python list while the question which is marked as same pertains to numpy arrays. They are clearly different

1
  • 7
    @NominSim that refers to a numpy array, which doesn't necessarily translate to his problem – Ivo Flipse May 14 '13 at 16:58
31

Use zip and itertools.chain. Something like:

>>> from itertools import chain
>>> l = chain.from_iterable(zip(*l))
<itertools.chain object at 0x104612610>
>>> list(l)
['0,0', '1,0', '2,0', '0,1', '1,1', '2,1']
3
  • @AndyHayden Actually, it's ok for active interactive shell user. Updated answer with direct variable name. – Alexey Kachayev May 14 '13 at 17:03
  • 1
    name 'l' is not defined – Sérgio Mar 2 '18 at 17:53
  • 1
    @Sérgio l is a list... – user4396006 Sep 3 '18 at 17:23
111

same way you did the fill in, but reverse the indexes:

>>> for j in range(columns):
...     for i in range(rows):
...        print mylist[i][j],
... 
0,0 1,0 2,0 0,1 1,1 2,1
>>> 
4
  • 21
    This should be the accepted answer, because it is simple and easy to understand. One may not be familiar with the clever functions used in the other answers, but with only a quick look at the code, it's obvious how this solution works. Because of that, this answer is the most Pythonic. – Mr. Lance E Sloan Nov 5 '13 at 12:28
  • 2
    Hmm.. What if each of the children lists doesn't have the save length (rows here) ? – sonlexqt Dec 13 '16 at 17:45
  • @sonlexqt iterate indexes of the longest row and use try ... except IndexError around the print operand. (On my cell so can't provide exact example) – Iliyan Bobev Dec 14 '16 at 3:44
  • But this doesn't work if the number of rows is more than the number of columns. – codeness93 Dec 19 '20 at 19:11
84

This is the correct way.

>>> x = [ ['0,0', '0,1'], ['1,0', '1,1'], ['2,0', '2,1'] ]
>>> for i in range(len(x)):
        for j in range(len(x[i])):
                print(x[i][j])


0,0
0,1
1,0
1,1
2,0
2,1
>>> 
1
  • 2
    This isn't very pythonic. – nelsontruran Feb 23 '20 at 19:11
7
>>> mylist = [["%s,%s"%(i,j) for j in range(columns)] for i in range(rows)]
>>> mylist
[['0,0', '0,1', '0,2'], ['1,0', '1,1', '1,2'], ['2,0', '2,1', '2,2']]
>>> zip(*mylist)
[('0,0', '1,0', '2,0'), ('0,1', '1,1', '2,1'), ('0,2', '1,2', '2,2')]
>>> sum(zip(*mylist),())
('0,0', '1,0', '2,0', '0,1', '1,1', '2,1', '0,2', '1,2', '2,2')
4

zip will transpose the list, after that you can concatenate the outputs.

In [3]: zip(*[ ['0,0', '0,1'], ['1,0', '1,1'], ['2,0', '2,1'] ])
Out[3]: [('0,0', '1,0', '2,0'), ('0,1', '1,1', '2,1')]
3
  • 2
    But @Alexey's answer is better. – Adrian Ratnapala May 14 '13 at 16:54
  • Why is Alexey's answer better? This uses built-in functions only, and doesn't seem substantially more resource intensive. – Z4-tier Apr 25 '20 at 21:27
  • @Z4-tier This response returns a list with 2 tuples. Alexey's answer returns a single list with all values – Vincent LE GARREC Nov 28 '20 at 8:11
2

Ref: zip built-in function

zip() in conjunction with the * operator can be used to unzip a list

unzip_lst = zip(*mylist)
for i in unzip_lst:
    for j in i:
        print j
1
>>> [el[0] if i < len(mylist) else el[1] for i,el in enumerate(mylist + mylist)]
['0,0', '1,0', '2,0', '0,1', '1,1', '2,1']
3

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