4

I have a c# function that finds patters of text in side an input and does some processing. (I am using 3.5 version of the .net framework)

public void func(string s)
{
    Regex r = new Regex("^\s*Pattern\s*$", RegexOptions.Multiline | RegexOptions.ExplicitCapture );
    Match m = r.Match(s);
    //Do something with m
}

A use of the function might look like this

string s = "Pattern \n Pattern \n non-Pattern";
func(s);

However, I am finding that sometimes my input is looking more like this

string s = "Pattern \r Pattern \r non-Pattern"
func(s);

And it is not being matched. Is there a way to have \r be treated like a \n within the regex? I figure I could always just replace all \rs with \ns, but I was hoping I could minimize operations if I could just get the regex do it all at once.

2

Unfortunatly, when I have run in to similar situations the only situation I found that works is I just do two passes with the regex (like you where hoping to avoid), the first one normalizes the line endings then the 2nd one can do the search as normal, there is no way to get Multiline to trigger on just /r that I could find.

public void func(string s)
{
    s = Regex.Replace(s, @"(\r\n|\n\r|\n|\r)", "\r\n");
    Regex r = new Regex("^\s*Pattern\s*$", RegexOptions.Multiline | RegexOptions.ExplicitCapture );
    Match m = r.Match(s);
    //Do something with m
}
  • Yeah, I guess I'm going to have to do something similar. I wonder why $ doesn't match \r like this? Feels like it should. – MarkB42 May 14 '13 at 18:18
  • 3
    Because \r is not considered a windows line-ending and .NET is a windows technology. The definition "Multiline" is not a feature of regex but a feature .NET added to regex, therefor there is no standard to follow. – Scott Chamberlain May 14 '13 at 18:20
  • 1
    I think 2 pass solution makes sense and easier to maintain. Just wondering: why \n\r is consider end of 1 line? – nhahtdh May 14 '13 at 18:31
  • 2
    I was just trying to get all possible combinations of malformed data, I don't think I have hit it before, but \r is not considered a valid ending in any modern OS either and running in to a data-source that had only \r is what prompted me to write the snippet I copy and pasted the above code from. Who knows, maybe I might run in to data from a BBC Micro system some day :) – Scott Chamberlain May 14 '13 at 18:34
  • I certainly wasn't expecting \r to be a new line, and excluded it from my unit tests (which all passed with \n!). However my code started failing live since \r showed up where I was expecting \n. – MarkB42 May 14 '13 at 19:11
2

According to the documentation Anchors in Regular Expression:

  • ^ in Multiline mode will match the beginning of input string, or the start of the line (as defined by \n).
  • $ in Multiline mode will match the end of input string, or just before \n.

If your purpose is to redefine the anchors to define a line with both \r and \n, then you have to simulate it with look-ahead and look-behind.

  • ^ should be simulated with (?<=\A|[\r\n])
  • $ should be simulated with (?=\Z|[\r\n])

Note that the simulation above will consider \r\n to have 3 starts of line and 3 ends of line. 1 start of line and 1 end of line are defined by start and end of the string. The other 2 starts of line and 2 ends of line are defined by \r and \n.

  • Please update your question on how to define a line. This answer define a line when it is ended with \r or \n. – nhahtdh May 14 '13 at 18:18
  • I'm not sure entirely understand what you mean. For my application \r\n being one line or two doesn't make any difference. Just as long as the Pattern exists as an entire line of the input text and I can Match every line that is such a Pattern. – MarkB42 May 14 '13 at 19:07
  • @MarkB42: It depends on your pattern. Can't make an example on top of my head now, but I believe there will be difference for certain pattern. – nhahtdh May 14 '13 at 19:15
1

You can match either /n or /r if you place them in an character set

[\n\r]

that will match one of either \n or \r characters

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