2

I have the following C code:

typedef struct DListNode_ {
    void    *data;
    struct DListNode_ *prev;
    struct DListNode_ *next;
} DListNode;


typedef struct DList_ {
    int size;
    DListNode  *tail;
    DListNode  *head;
} DList;

void insert(DList * list, DListNode * element, int data) {
    DListNode * new_element = (DListNode *)malloc(sizeof(DListNode));
    new_element->data = &data;
    if (list->head==NULL) {
        list->head=list->tail=new_element;
        list->size++;
        return;
    }
    if(element == NULL) {
        // handle size==0?
        new_element->next=list->head;
        list->head->prev=new_element;
        list->head=new_element;
        list->size++;
    } else {
        printf("Not yet implemented!\n");
    }
}

void printNodes(DList *list) {
    DListNode * pointer = list->head;
    if (pointer!=NULL) {
        int v= *((int*)pointer->data);
        printf("Node has value: %d\n", v);
        while (pointer->next != NULL) {
            v = *((int*)pointer->data);
            printf("Node has value: %d\n", v);
            pointer=pointer->next;
        }
    }
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{

    int e0 = 23;
    int e1 = 7;
    int e2 = 11;
    DList *list = (DList *)malloc(sizeof(DList));
    initList(list);
    assert(count(list)==0);
    insert(list, NULL, e0);
    assert(count(list)==1);

    insert(list,NULL, e1);
    assert(count(list)==2);

    insert(list,NULL, e2);
    assert(count(list)==3);
    printNodes(list);

    return 0;
}

I have a few problems:

  1. does DListNode * new_element = (DListNode *)malloc(sizeof(DListNode)); also allocate space for the, data, prev, next pointer or do I manually need to call malloc on each of those pointers?
  2. When I print the content of the data pointer in each node they all have the value 3 even though I insert 23, 7 and 11 and set the data pointer to the address of the int: ** new_element->data = &data;**.

(Introductionary textbooks on C have been ordered)

EDIT:

insert now takes a void pointer to the data:

// Insert data as the new head
void insert(DList *list, DListNode *element, void *data) {
    DListNode *new_element = malloc(sizeof(DListNode));
    new_element->data = data;
    if (list->head==NULL) {
        list->head=list->tail=new_element;
        list->size++;
        return;
    }
    if(element == NULL) {
        new_element->next=list->head;
        list->head->prev=new_element;
        list->head=new_element;
        list->size++;
    } else {
        printf("Not yet implemented!\n");
    }
}

In main I do:

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    int i0=7;
    int *ip0 = malloc(sizeof(int));
    ip0 = &i0;

    int i1=8;
    int *ip1 = malloc(sizeof(int));
    ip1 = &i1;

    int *ip2 = malloc(sizeof(int));
    int i2=44;
    ip2 = &i2;

    DList *list = malloc(sizeof(DList));
    initList(list);
    // create some nodes
    assert(count(list)==0);
    insert(list, NULL, ip0);
    assert(count(list)==1);

    insert(list,NULL, ip1);
    assert(count(list)==2);

    insert(list,NULL, ip2);
    assert(count(list)==3);
    printNodes(list);

    return 0;
}

which outputs:

Node has value: 44
Node has value: 44
Node has value: 8

but it should be:

Node has value: 44
Node has value: 8
Node has value: 7
  • 4
    You don't need to cast the return value of malloc in a C program. – Carl Norum May 14 '13 at 18:21
  • A DListNode_ is nothing more than the sum of its fields. There is nothing to allocate other than than the pointers you mentioned. – ApproachingDarknessFish May 14 '13 at 18:25
3
  1. malloc(sizeof(DListNode)) allocates space for exactly one DListNode, which by definition consists of a void* and two DListNode pointers. It does not initialize those pointers, though.

  2. You're assigning the address of the data argument to insert. That's a pointer to a temporary which is invalidated once insert returns. The behavior of the program is undefined. The easy solution is to just replace void *data by int data.

  • 1
    .. and initializing them may not require a call to malloc. In fact, for normal linked-list behaviour, you probably won't malloc them. – Carl Norum May 14 '13 at 18:23
  • @CarlNorum: I'm not sure what you mean. Whenever (or: the few times that) I implemented linked lists in C, I malloc'd every node, separately, although that's not required in every situation. – Fred Foo May 14 '13 at 18:27
  • I'm pretty sure (though he can correct me if I'm wrong) that the OP is asking if he needs to call malloc three more times after his program's current call to initialize the pointers in his list structure. I'm just saying that he probably doesn't. – Carl Norum May 14 '13 at 18:28
  • @CarlNorum: ah, right. – Fred Foo May 14 '13 at 18:29
0
  1. You need to manually set those pointers to where they point with malloc. Without it, they will point to a space that isn't of size DListNode.

  2. Don't make the data a pointer. Just make the data an int (it gets auto allocated) and then just set data = data (the data that is passed into insert).

  • malloc is probably not necessary for normal list semantics. Just point them at preexisting nodes (or to NULL if there aren't any). – Carl Norum May 14 '13 at 18:23
  • 1
    Yes, as long as there is already a node there, you are correct. Otherwise, when you create a node, the easiest way is to malloc these structures from the next pointers. – Magn3s1um May 14 '13 at 18:24
  • Why would you ever do that? If you didn't already have a node, you'd want the list pointers all to be NULL, right? – Carl Norum May 14 '13 at 18:24
  • It is the same thing to malloc a node, and then set the pointers, as it is to malloc the space from the pointers and place a node struct there. – Magn3s1um May 14 '13 at 18:26
  • OK, I think I see what you're getting at. I think you're going to confuse the OP more than help him, though. – Carl Norum May 14 '13 at 18:27

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