29

I was wondering if in Java there is a function like the python range function.

range(4)

and it would return

[0,1,2,3]

This was an easy way to make for enhanced loops. It would be great to do this in Java because it would make for loops a lot easier. Is this possible?

3
55

Java 8 (2014) has added IntStream (similar to apache commons IntRange), so you don't need external lib now.

import java.util.stream.IntStream; 

IntStream.range(0, 3).forEachOrdered(n -> {
    System.out.println(n);
});

forEach can be used in place of forEachOrdered too if order is not important.

IntStream.range(0, 3).parallel() can be used for loops to run in parallel

21

Without an external library, you can do the following. It will consume significantly less memory for big ranges than the current accepted answer, as there is no array created.

Have a class like this:

class Range implements Iterable<Integer> {

    private int limit;

    public Range(int limit) {
        this.limit = limit;
    }

    @Override
    public Iterator<Integer> iterator() {
        final int max = limit;
        return new Iterator<Integer>() {

            private int current = 0;

            @Override
            public boolean hasNext() {
                return current < max;
            }

            @Override
            public Integer next() {
                if (hasNext()) {
                    return current++;   
                } else {
                    throw new NoSuchElementException("Range reached the end");
                }
            }

            @Override
            public void remove() {
                throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Can't remove values from a Range");
            }
        };
    }
}

and you can simply use it like this:

    for (int i : new Range(5)) {
        System.out.println(i);
    }

you can even reuse it:

    Range range5 = new Range(5);

    for (int i : range5) {
        System.out.println(i);
    }
    for (int i : range5) {
        System.out.println(i);
    }

As Henry Keiter pointed out in the comment below, we could add following method to the Range class (or anywhere else):

public static Range range(int max) {
    return new Range(max);
}

and then, in the other classes we can

import static package.name.Range.range;

and simply call

for (int i : range(5)) {
    System.out.println(i);
}
3
  • 3
    +1 for actually writing out an Iterator for this! For fun: you could further wrap this in Python-like syntax with a simple getter method: public static Range range(int max) { return new Range(max); }, so your loop becomes for (int i : range(5)) {} – Henry Keiter May 15 '13 at 17:08
  • @HenryKeiter That's a nice suggestion, I like it so much I'll update my answer (and give you the credit). – jlordo May 15 '13 at 17:12
  • It is a nice answer, but not to the question. It simply implies that 'No, there is not a function like range, you must implement your own iterator'. Sorry, -1 for that. – OndroMih Sep 1 '15 at 14:06
13

Um... for (int i = 0; i < k; i++)? You don't have to write enhanced for loops all day, you know, although they are cool...

And just for the sake of argument:

for (int i : range(k)) char count: 22

for (int i = 0; i < k; i++) char count: 27

Discounting the implementation of range, it is pseudo even.

6
  • Well this is the normal way to do it, but it would be a lot simpler if you could make an array for the loop to use. – Kacper Lubisz May 15 '13 at 16:17
  • 1
    This isn't what he's asking, though; he wants to know if there's an "easier" way. – Henry Keiter May 15 '13 at 16:19
  • 1
    @HenryKeiter:that's true, just trying to counter OP's argument: "It would be great to do this in java because it would makes for loops a lot easier". – zw324 May 15 '13 at 16:20
  • 1
    Well, I certainly can't disagree with you there. Seems like a lot of effort just to save a couple of characters (and ignore all conventions on the way), but I'm not here to judge what (anti-)idioms people might want to use :) – Henry Keiter May 15 '13 at 16:28
  • @ExotickBoyPl you can make somethink like an array, just much more efficient, if you look at my answer ;) – jlordo May 15 '13 at 16:45
11

Use Apache Commons Lang:

new IntRange(0, 3).toArray();

I wouldn't normally advocate introducing external libraries for something so simple, but Apache Commons are so widely used that you probably already have it in your project!

Edit: I know its not necessarily as simple or fast as a for loop, but its a nice bit of syntactic sugar that makes the intent clear.

Edit: See @zengr's answer using IntStream in Java 8 .

3
  • Well its not ,but I was expecting it to be, its still go to know – Kacper Lubisz May 15 '13 at 16:24
  • 3
    This will also be much slower than the traditional for loop. – Louis Wasserman May 15 '13 at 16:26
  • This solution is pretty inefficient - you need a big array for big ranges. Extending AbstractList is the simplest efficient solution I can think of. – OndroMih Sep 1 '15 at 14:12
3

If you really, really want to obtain an equivalent result in Java, you'll have to do some more work:

public int[] range(int start, int end, int step) {
    int n = (int) Math.ceil((end-start)/(double)step);
    int[] arange = new int[n];
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        arange[i] = i*step+start;
    return arange;
}

Now range(0, 4, 1) will return the expected value, just like Python: [0, 1, 2, 3]. Sadly there isn't a simpler way in Java, it's not a very expressive language, like Python.

1
  • The implementation has some flaws. Run int[] range = range(5, 33, 5); System.out.println(Arrays.toString(range)); – jlordo May 15 '13 at 16:47
1

Its not available that true. But you make a static method and use it -

public static int[] range(int index){
    int[] arr = new int[index];
    for(int i=0;i<index;i++){
        arr[i]=i;
    }
    return arr;
}
2
  • That will create a huge array, if you want a range to Integer.MAX_VALUE ;) – jlordo May 15 '13 at 16:43
  • You could just check you available primary memory, even you may add some more heheh :P – Subhrajyoti Majumder May 15 '13 at 16:47
0

As far as I know, there's not an equivalent function in java. But you can write it yourself:

public static int[] range(int n) {
    int[] ans = new int[n];
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        ans[i] = i;
    }
    return ans;
}
3
  • That will create a huge array, if you want a range to Integer.MAX_VALUE ;) – jlordo May 15 '13 at 16:48
  • @jlordo If you push it to that, yes, it will... and so would python's range() function – Barranka May 15 '13 at 16:50
  • 1
    that's why I like Java, because it is easy to have the functionality without using that much memory :) – jlordo May 15 '13 at 16:51
0

There's no Java equivalent to the range function, but there is an enhanced for-loop:

for (String s : strings) {
    // Do stuff
}

You could also roll your own range function, if you're really attached to the syntax, but it seems a little silly.

public static int[] range(int length) {
    int[] r = new int[length];
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        r[i] = i;
    }
    return r;
}

// ...

String s;
for (int i : range(arrayOfStrings.length)) {
    s = arrayOfStrings[i];
    // Do stuff
}
3
  • That will create a huge array, if you want a range to Integer.MAX_VALUE ;) – jlordo May 15 '13 at 16:48
  • @jlordo Well that's certainly true ;-) But the same is true of the range function in Python (2), and I felt like writing up an Iterator was overkill for just trying to avoid writing a basic loop (+1 to your answer for actually doing it though, lol). – Henry Keiter May 15 '13 at 17:04
  • certainly overkill for a simple loop. Although you could modify the iterator to use all of the other options the Python range() method has and use much less memory ;) Thanks for +1 – jlordo May 15 '13 at 17:06
0

What you can do to substitute the range in python in java can be done with the following code. NOTE: I am not going off of your code, I am just writing a small piece of code and showing it to you.

in python you would do.. . .

if -2 <= x <= 10:
     print(x) 

in java you would substitute this range and do. . ..

if(x >= -2 && x <= 10){
System.out.println("x")
}

By doing the above code in java, you don't need a range, but you have the -2 <= x <=10 range and split it into x >= -2 and x <= 10. It means the same thing, but the one I explained in java may take the compiler a longer time to read. So if you are using python go with the former's code format, and if you are using java, use the latter's code format.

1
  • Welcome to Stackoverflow and congratulations on your first answer. Here we try to keep answers focused on the specific question asked -- it is not immediately clear how what you wrote relates to the specific question of whether there was an equivalent of range(,,) in Java. You may want to enhance your answer by linking it more directly to the specific question – piterbarg Nov 29 '20 at 0:32

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