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I was wondering why

'((atom1) . atom2)

is the improper List out of the following selections

'(atom1 . (atom2))
'((atom1) . atom2)
'(atom1 atom2)
(cdr '(atom1))
(cons 'atom1 '(atom2))
3
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A proper list is either the empty list, or a cons cell in which the car points to a datum (which may be another cons structure, such as a list), and the cdr points to another proper list. See here for details. In this example:

'((atom1) . atom2)

atom2 is not the null list, so it follows that it's improper. Let's look at the other examples:

; `(atom2)` is a list, so the whole expression is a list
'(atom1 . (atom2))

; it's a well-formed list of atoms
'(atom1 atom2)         

; the `cdr` part of '(atom1) is the null list, which is also a proper list
(cdr '(atom1))         

; consing an element at the head of a proper lists yields a proper list
(cons 'atom1 '(atom2)) 
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    By definition, an atom is not a list. I'm assuming that the name atom2 indicates precisely this: that it's an atom. Of course, if someone named atom something that is not an atom, I wouldn't have a way to know it :) – Óscar López May 15 '13 at 17:20
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    atom2 is not a list, it's an atom. It can't become a list - but you can put it inside a list. This list is proper: '((atom1) . (atom2)) – Óscar López May 15 '13 at 17:26
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    atom2 is actually a symbol, so of course it's not a list. Remember your list is quoted, so it can't possibly be evaluated as a variable reference or anything. – Chris Jester-Young May 15 '13 at 17:29
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    @ÓscarLópez null symbol? This isn't Common Lisp. :-) (In Scheme, an empty-list object is not a symbol. In CL, the nil symbol is used as the representation of an empty list.) – Chris Jester-Young May 15 '13 at 17:31
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    @WilliamMcCarty Yes, '((atom1) . '(atom2 atom3 atom4)) is the same as '((atom1) quote (atom2 atom3 atom4)) and is a proper list. But I think you actually meant '((atom1) . (atom2 atom3 atom4)), which is also a proper list ('((atom1) atom2 atom3 atom4)). – Chris Jester-Young May 15 '13 at 17:43
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An improper list is where any pair satisfies:

(define (improper? pair)
  (and (not (eq?   (cdr pair) '()))
       (not (pair? (cdr pair)))))

In words an improper list is one where any pair is anything other than another pair or the empty list.

> (improper? '(atom1 . (atom2)))
#f
> (improper? '((atom1) . atom2))
#t
> (improper? '(atom1 atom2))
#f
> (improper? (cdr '(atom1)))
#f ;; (cdr '(atom1)) is not a pair - can't use my improper?
> (improper? (cons 'atom1 '(atom2)))
#f

Or stated inversely for any 'thing' (not just a 'pair'):

(define (proper? thing)       ;; the cdr of the last pair must be '()
  (or (null? thing)
      (and (pair? thing)
           (proper? (cdr thing)))))
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  • 1
    the last pair with a pair in its cdr is not a last pair. – Will Ness May 15 '13 at 19:11
  • Adjusted 'last' -> 'any', which is closer but feels a bit wrong. – GoZoner May 15 '13 at 19:13
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    I don't think that's right. All the pairs in an improper list except the last pair are normal pairs. Besides, the name is not very good. is it improper-list? or improper-pair? or improper-atom? or what? :) BTW your first code was OK; just the wording/naming was a little bit off. I've never saw pairs being referred to as "improper". But if we talk about lists, a list is improper if its last pair's cdr is not null?, that's all. :) – Will Ness May 15 '13 at 19:17

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