86

Consider JSON in this format :

"Stuffs": [
    {
        "Name": "Darts",
        "Type": "Fun Stuff"
    },
    {
        "Name": "Clean Toilet",
        "Type": "Boring Stuff"
    }
]

In PowerShell 3, we can obtain a list of Stuffs :

$JSON = Get-Content $jsonConfigFile | Out-String | ConvertFrom-Json

Assuming we don't know the exact contents of the list, including the ordering of the objects, how can we retrieve the object(s) with a specific value for the Name field ?

Brute force, we could iterate through the list :

foreach( $Stuff in $JSON.Stuffs ) { 

But I am hopeful there exists a more direct mechanism ( similar to Lync or Lambda expressions in C# ).

6 Answers 6

120
$json = @"
{
"Stuffs": 
    [
        {
            "Name": "Darts",
            "Type": "Fun Stuff"
        },

        {
            "Name": "Clean Toilet",
            "Type": "Boring Stuff"
        }
    ]
}
"@

$x = $json | ConvertFrom-Json

$x.Stuffs[0] # access to Darts
$x.Stuffs[1] # access to Clean Toilet
$darts = $x.Stuffs | where { $_.Name -eq "Darts" } #Darts
3
  • Thanks David. I have amended my question to be more clear. Your answer won't work because the code will not know ahead of time how the JSON is structured. It could be that Darts is in slot 0 and Clean Toilet in slot 1, but it could also be that Clean Toilet is in slot 0 and Darts is in slot 1. Therefore I need some way to match objects on the Name field.
    – BaltoStar
    May 16, 2013 at 11:00
  • Not to be picky but... Isn't this just a "glorified" brute force? It's not like the Where-Object isn't looping through the collection just like foreach. In fact, I think Where-Object uses foreach anyway. Jun 25, 2020 at 14:02
  • Unless PS for some reason would keep a hashtable index on every key in any JSON structure there is no way around a "brute force" here. You could arguably hide it with syntax in some other languages, but that would be all. Oct 28, 2021 at 6:39
42

I just asked the same question here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/23062370/3532136 It has a good solution. I hope it helps ^^. In resume, you can use this:

The Json file in my case was called jsonfile.json:

{
    "CARD_MODEL_TITLE": "OWNER'S MANUAL",
    "CARD_MODEL_SUBTITLE": "Configure your download",
    "CARD_MODEL_SELECT": "Select Model",
    "CARD_LANG_TITLE": "Select Language",
    "CARD_LANG_DEVICE_LANG": "Your device",
    "CARD_YEAR_TITLE": "Select Model Year",
    "CARD_YEAR_LATEST": "(Latest)",
    "STEPS_MODEL": "Model",
    "STEPS_LANGUAGE": "Language",
    "STEPS_YEAR": "Model Year",
    "BUTTON_BACK": "Back",
    "BUTTON_NEXT": "Next",
    "BUTTON_CLOSE": "Close"
}

Code:

$json = (Get-Content "jsonfile.json" -Raw) | ConvertFrom-Json

$json.psobject.properties.name

Output:

CARD_MODEL_TITLE
CARD_MODEL_SUBTITLE
CARD_MODEL_SELECT
CARD_LANG_TITLE
CARD_LANG_DEVICE_LANG
CARD_YEAR_TITLE
CARD_YEAR_LATEST
STEPS_MODEL
STEPS_LANGUAGE
STEPS_YEAR
BUTTON_BACK
BUTTON_NEXT
BUTTON_CLOSE

Thanks to mjolinor.

2
  • Warning: A JSON object can contain 0 or more name-value pairs. This solution works nicely unless the object has 0 name-value pairs. Then powershell fails: PS > $el = ConvertFrom-Json "{ }" PS> $el.psobject.properties.name The property 'name' cannot be found on this object. Verify that the property exists. Nov 9, 2019 at 14:45
  • Another warning: If a JSON object (say $el) has 1 name-value pair then $el.psobject.properties.name returns the length of the name in characters rather than the number of name-value pairs (i.e. 1) Nov 10, 2019 at 0:46
23

David Brabant's answer led me to what I needed, with this addition:

x.Stuffs | where { $_.Name -eq "Darts" } | Select -ExpandProperty Type
6

Hows about this:

$json=Get-Content -Raw -Path 'my.json' | Out-String | ConvertFrom-Json
$foo="TheVariableYourUsingToSelectSomething"
$json.SomePathYouKnow.psobject.properties.Where({$_.name -eq $foo}).value

which would select from json structured

{"SomePathYouKnow":{"TheVariableYourUsingToSelectSomething": "Tada!"}

This is based on this accessing values in powershell SO question . Isn't powershell fabulous!

3

In regards to PowerShell 5.1 (this is so much easier in PowerShell 7)...

Operating off the assumption that we have a file named jsonConfigFile.json with the following content from your post:

{
    "Stuffs": [
        {
            "Name": "Darts",
            "Type": "Fun Stuff"
        },
        {
            "Name": "Clean Toilet",
            "Type": "Boring Stuff"
        }
    ]
}

This will create an ordered hashtable from a JSON file to help make retrieval easier:

$json = [ordered]@{}

(Get-Content "jsonConfigFile.json" -Raw | ConvertFrom-Json).PSObject.Properties |
    ForEach-Object { $json[$_.Name] = $_.Value }

$json.Stuffs will list a nice hashtable, but it gets a little more complicated from here. Say you want the Type key's value associated with the Clean Toilet key, you would retrieve it like this:

$json.Stuffs.Where({$_.Name -eq "Clean Toilet"}).Type

It's a pain in the ass, but if your goal is to use JSON on a barebones Windows 10 installation, this is the best way to do it as far as I've found.

2

This is my json data:

[
   {
      "name":"Test",
      "value":"TestValue"
   },
   {
      "name":"Test",
      "value":"TestValue"
   }
]

Powershell script:

$data = Get-Content "Path to json file" | Out-String | ConvertFrom-Json

foreach ($line in $data) {
     $line.name
}

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