8

Why does java require a double equals sign (==) when comparing Integers in a if statement?

For example

if(x = 3.141)
     System.out.println("x is equal to pi.");

is incorrect, it should be

if(x == 3.141)
     System.out.println("x is equal to pi.");

I know that "==" is used to compare integers and "=" is used to set an integer value, but why in a if statement does this remain true?

Is it even allowed to assign a variable a value in an if statement (or initiate a new variable)?

Is there any reason anyone would ever want to assign a variable a new value inside an if statement (if so please provide an example)?

This seems like a question that should already have an answer, but I was unable to find one on here or using google, if this is a duplicate question please tell me and I will remove it immediately.

8 Answers 8

10

Wouldn't it be confusing if = sometimes did assignment, and sometimes comparison, depending in which context you used it?

That sounds like a bad idea, and would introduce errors.

Plus, the current syntax is compatible with C and C++, so a lot of people are familiar with it.

Is there any reason anyone would ever want to assine a variable a new value inside of an if statement (if so please provide an example)?

It's quite common in while loops:

int b;
while ((b=in.read()) != -1){
3
  • Can you int. a variable in a if statement?
    – java
    May 16, 2013 at 2:15
  • 1
    Fun fact: VB (and VB.NET) overload = for both assignment and equality. [VB]a = b = c == [Java]a = b == c; (not [Java]a = b = c;). May 16, 2013 at 2:17
  • @michaelb958: But they don't have == at all then, right? So that's consistent, too.
    – Thilo
    May 16, 2013 at 2:18
3
= 

is used for assignment.

== 

is used for comparison.

Is it even allowed to assign a variable a value in an if statement (or initiate a new variable)?

yes it is allowed.

2
  • Initialize new variable is not allowed, IIRC. That is only allowed in for
    – nhahtdh
    May 16, 2013 at 2:17
  • @nhahtdh Initialization is not allowed. Assignment is.
    – eyadMhanna
    May 16, 2013 at 2:21
1

Note what error message you get for if (x = 3.141); it is a type error (cannot convert from double to boolean).

The assignment's type is the type of its both sides; if the type of the assignment is boolean (if (x = true), or even if (x = a.equals(b))), then it is legal to write.

So since it is legal to assign a value to a boolean in the condition, you'd have to use == for comparison.

2
  • If the type of the assignment is boolean (if (x = true)), then it is legal to write. While this is correct, it is most likely an error. Why would one wants to assign, then test right away?
    – nhahtdh
    May 16, 2013 at 2:12
  • 1
    @nhahtdh changed my example. I agree it is bad style, though.
    – zw324
    May 16, 2013 at 2:14
1

Is it even allowed to assine a variable a value in an if statement (or initiate a new variable)?

Yes. A common idiom for doing this is:

String line = null;
while ( (line = in.readLine()) != null ) {
  // do work
}

In the loop, line is assigned a value and then compared to null. I can't think of an example with ints; it certainly wouldn't be clear there.

3
  • and in a if statement? I cant set and variable = to another or int. a variable with out getting so kind of error
    – java
    May 16, 2013 at 2:13
  • @java: You don't just simply set the variable. If you want to set a bunch of variable, then you can do it before while loop. Unless you can incorporate the assignment in a comparison, like in the example, then you won't be able to do assignment in the condition of while. That said, don't force yourself to write such thing if it is unnatural and confusing.
    – nhahtdh
    May 16, 2013 at 2:17
  • 1
    So you want = to behave differently not just in conditionals and statements, but also differently for conditions of while and if?
    – Thilo
    May 16, 2013 at 2:17
1

History of programming languages 101:

  • Fortran uses = for both.
  • Algol introduced := for assignment and used = for comparison. This was required to resolve a grammar ambiguity.
  • Pascal followed suit.
  • PL/1 did not.
  • I can't speak for B or BCPL but by the time we got C it was = for assignment and == for comparison, again to resolve a grammar ambiguity
  • C++ followed C
  • Java followed C++ in many respects including this one.

The grammar ambiguity arises because of allowing assignments in expressions. Contrary to your assertion, if (x = true) is legal in Java if x is of type boolean.

1

== is the identity comparator, which works for both objects and primitives. It answers the question "are the two things the same thing".

= is the assignment operator. It sets the value of the left side to the right side.

Things can turn buggy when using your example with booleans:

boolean b;

if (b = true) // This compiles, but is a bug, because it sets b, not tests it

While other types won't compile with this syntax, boolean and Boolean do, so that's why the following pattern is advised:

if (b)
0

you can absolutely assign a variable in an if statement. also, that's just the way it works: = always is assignment, and == is always comparison.

0

So..

= is assignment, and == is comparison, and it is always like this, no matter where they are used.

And assignment is different with "declaration". An assignment statement has its return value, while a declaration doesn't. So you can't write boolean a = false in the () of if statement, but you can write a = false when a has been declared before.

Not all assignments are legal. For example:

int index;
if (index = str.indexOf("something")) {
    ...
}

It's not legal, because String.indexOf(String) returns an int, while if requires a boolean.

Also, there is a huge difference between "legal" and "making sense".

int index;
if ((index = str.indexOf("something")) != -1) {
    ...
}

It is legal, as != operation returns a boolean, and it makes sense, as I do want to check if the str contains a substring "something";

However,

int index;
boolean flag;
if ( flag = ((index = str.indexOf("something")) != -1) ) {
    ...
}

is also legal, as the statement as last returns a boolean; but it DOESN'T make sense, because the != statement already returns a boolean.

1
  • The reason you can't use a declaration in a condition is because the syntax doesn't allow it, not because 'a declaration doesn't have a return value'.
    – user207421
    Mar 25, 2015 at 7:14

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