114

I want to handle the special case where multiplying two numbers together causes an overflow. The code looks something like this:

int a = 20;
long b = 30;

// if a or b are big enough, this result will silently overflow
long c = a * b;

That's a simplified version. In the real program a and b are sourced elsewhere at runtime. What I want to achieve is something like this:

long c;
if (a * b will overflow) {
    c = Long.MAX_VALUE;
} else {
    c = a * b;
}

How do you suggest I best code this?

Update: a and b are always non-negative in my scenario.

1

15 Answers 15

109

Java 8 has Math.multiplyExact, Math.addExact etc. for ints and long. These throw an unchecked ArithmeticException on overflow.

0
62

If a and b are both positive then you can use:

if (a != 0 && b > Long.MAX_VALUE / a) {
    // Overflow
}

If you need to deal with both positive and negative numbers then it's more complicated:

long maximum = Long.signum(a) == Long.signum(b) ? Long.MAX_VALUE : Long.MIN_VALUE;

if (a != 0 && (b > 0 && b > maximum / a ||
               b < 0 && b < maximum / a))
{
    // Overflow
}

Here's a little table I whipped up to check this, pretending that overflow happens at -10 or +10:

a =  5   b =  2     2 >  10 /  5
a =  2   b =  5     5 >  10 /  2
a = -5   b =  2     2 > -10 / -5
a = -2   b =  5     5 > -10 / -2
a =  5   b = -2    -2 < -10 /  5
a =  2   b = -5    -5 < -10 /  2
a = -5   b = -2    -2 <  10 / -5
a = -2   b = -5    -5 <  10 / -2
4
  • I should mention that a and b are always non-negative in my scenario, which would simplify this approach somewhat. Nov 1, 2009 at 18:17
  • 3
    I think this may fail a case: a = -1 and b = 10. The maximum / a expression result in Integer.MIN_VALUE and detects overflow when none existed
    – Kyle
    Dec 28, 2014 at 2:34
  • This is really nice. For those wondering, the reason this works is that for integer n, n > x is the same as n > floor(x). For positive integers division does an implicit floor. (For negative numbers it rounds up instead) May 5, 2015 at 22:44
  • To address the a = -1 and b = 10 issue, see my answer below. Nov 3, 2015 at 18:27
18

There are Java libraries that provide safe arithmetic operations, which check long overflow/underflow. For example, Guava's LongMath.checkedMultiply(long a, long b) returns the product of a and b, provided it does not overflow, and throws ArithmeticException if a * b overflows in signed long arithmetic.

6
  • 5
    This is the best answer -- use a library which was implemented by people who really understand machine arithmetic in Java and which has been tested by lots of people. Don't attempt to write your own or use any of the half-baked untested code posted in the other answers!
    – Rich
    Jan 21, 2014 at 11:22
  • @Enerccio -- I don't understand your comment. Are you saying that Guava won't work on all systems? I can assure you that it will work everywhere that Java does. Are you saying that reusing code is a bad idea in general? I disagree if so.
    – Rich
    Aug 10, 2015 at 9:49
  • 2
    @Rich I am saying including huge library so you can use one function is a bad idea.
    – Enerccio
    Aug 10, 2015 at 11:52
  • Why? If you're writing a large application, for example for a business, then an extra JAR on the classpath won't do any harm and Guava has lots of very useful code in it. It's much better to reuse their carefully tested code than to try to write your own version of the same (which I presume is what you recommend?). If you're writing in an environment where an extra JAR is going to be very expensive (where? embedded Java?) then perhaps you should extract just this class from Guava. Is copying an untested answer from StackOverflow better than copying Guava's carefully tested code?
    – Rich
    Aug 10, 2015 at 12:48
  • Isn't throwing an exception a bit overkill for something a conditional if-then can handle?
    – victtim
    Jan 19, 2018 at 14:30
6

You could use java.math.BigInteger instead and check the size of the result (haven't tested the code):

BigInteger bigC = BigInteger.valueOf(a) * multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(b));
if(bigC.compareTo(BigInteger.valueOf(Long.MAX_VALUE)) > 0) {
  c = Long.MAX_VALUE;
} else {
  c = bigC.longValue()
}
4
  • 7
    i find this solution rather slow
    – nothrow
    Nov 1, 2009 at 18:14
  • It's probably the best way to do it, though. I assumed this was a numerical application, which is why I didn't recommend it offhand, but this really is probably the best way to solve this problem. Nov 1, 2009 at 18:15
  • 2
    I'm not sure you can use the '>' operator with BigInteger. the compareTo method should be used.
    – Pierre
    Nov 1, 2009 at 18:16
  • changed to compareTo, and speed might matter or might not, depends on the circumstances where the code will be used. Nov 1, 2009 at 18:21
5

Use logarithms to check the size of the result.

7
  • do you mean: ceil(log(a)) + ceil(log(b)) > log(Long.MAX)? Nov 1, 2009 at 18:16
  • 1
    I checked it. For small values it is 20% faster than BigInteger and for values near MAX it is nearly the same (5% faster). Yossarian's code is the fastest (95% & 75% faster than BigInteger). Nov 1, 2009 at 19:09
  • I rather suspect that it may fail in some cases. Nov 1, 2009 at 23:47
  • Remember an integer log is effectively just counting the number of leading zeroes, and you can optimise some common cases (e.g. if ((a | b) & 0xffffffff00000000L) == 0) you know you're safe). On the other hand, unless you can get your optimisation down to 30/40-ish clock cycles for the commonest cases, John Kugelman's method will probably perform better (an integer division is c. 2 bits/clock cycle as I recall). Nov 2, 2009 at 4:26
  • P.S. Sorr, I think I need an extra bit set in the AND mask (0xffffffff80000000L)-- it's a bit late, but you get the idea... Nov 2, 2009 at 4:27
5

Here is the simplest way I can think of

int a = 20;
long b = 30;
long c = a * b;

if(c / b == a) {
   // Everything fine.....no overflow
} else {
   // Overflow case, because in case of overflow "c/b" can't equal "a"
}
4

Does Java has something like int.MaxValue? If yes, then try

if (b != 0 && Math.abs(a) > Math.abs(Long.MAX_VALUE / b))
{
 // it will overflow
}

edit: seen Long.MAX_VALUE in question

6
  • I didn't downvote but Math.Abs(a) doesn't work if a is Long.MIN_VALUE. Nov 1, 2009 at 18:31
  • @John - a and b are > 0. I think Yossarian's approach (b != 0 && a > Long.MAX_VALUE / b) is the best. Nov 1, 2009 at 18:44
  • @Thomas, a and b are >= 0, that is, non-negative. Nov 1, 2009 at 18:50
  • 2
    Right, but in that case no need for the Abs's. If negative numbers are allowed then this fails for at least one edge case. That's all I'm saying, just being nitpicky. Nov 1, 2009 at 18:59
  • in Java you must use Math.abs, not Math.Abs (C# guy?)
    – dfa
    Nov 1, 2009 at 22:07
3

Stolen from jruby

    long result = a * b;
    if (a != 0 && result / a != b) {
       // overflow
    }

UPDATE: This code is short and works well; however, it fails for a = -1, b = Long.MIN_VALUE.

One possible enhancement:

long result = a * b;
if( (Math.signum(a) * Math.signum(b) != Math.signum(result)) || 
    (a != 0L && result / a != b)) {
    // overflow
}

Note that this will catch some overflows without any division.

1
3

As has been pointed out, Java 8 has Math.xxxExact methods that throw exceptions on overflow.

If you are not using Java 8 for your project, you can still "borrow" their implementations which are pretty compact.

Here are some links to these implementations in the JDK source code repository, no guarantee whether these will stay valid but in any case you should be able to download the JDK source and see how they do their magic inside the java.lang.Math class.

Math.multiplyExact(long, long) http://hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk/jdk11/file/1ddf9a99e4ad/src/java.base/share/classes/java/lang/Math.java#l925

Math.addExact(long, long) http://hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk/jdk11/file/1ddf9a99e4ad/src/java.base/share/classes/java/lang/Math.java#l830

etc, etc.

UPDATED: switched out invalid links to 3rd party website to links to the Mercurial repositories of Open JDK.

2

I am not sure why nobody is looking at solution like:

if (Long.MAX_VALUE/a > b) {
     // overflows
} 

Choose a to be larger of the two numbers.

1
  • 2
    I don't think it matters if a is the larger or the smaller? May 5, 2015 at 22:46
2

I'd like to build on John Kugelman's answer without replacing it by editing it directly. It works for his test case (MIN_VALUE = -10, MAX_VALUE = 10) because of the symmetry of MIN_VALUE == -MAX_VALUE, which isn't the case for two's complement integers. In actuality, MIN_VALUE == -MAX_VALUE - 1.

scala> (java.lang.Integer.MIN_VALUE, java.lang.Integer.MAX_VALUE)
res0: (Int, Int) = (-2147483648,2147483647)

scala> (java.lang.Long.MIN_VALUE, java.lang.Long.MAX_VALUE)
res1: (Long, Long) = (-9223372036854775808,9223372036854775807)

When applied to the true MIN_VALUE and MAX_VALUE, John Kugelman's answer yields an overflow case when a == -1 and b == anything else (point first raised by Kyle). Here's a way to fix it:

long maximum = Long.signum(a) == Long.signum(b) ? Long.MAX_VALUE : Long.MIN_VALUE;

if ((a == -1 && b == Long.MIN_VALUE) ||
    (a != -1 && a != 0 && ((b > 0 && b > maximum / a) ||
                           (b < 0 && b < maximum / a))))
{
    // Overflow
}

It's not a general solution for any MIN_VALUE and MAX_VALUE, but it is general for Java's Long and Integer and any value of a and b.

2
  • I just thought it would unnecessarily complicate it, since this solution only works if MIN_VALUE = -MAX_VALUE - 1, not any other case (including your example test case). I'd have to change a lot. Nov 3, 2015 at 21:15
  • 1
    For reasons beyond the needs of the original poster; for people like me who found this page because they needed a solution for a more general case (handling negative numbers and not strictly Java 8). In fact, since this solution doesn't involve any functions beyond pure arithmetic and logic, it could be used for C or other languages as well. Nov 6, 2015 at 4:19
1

Maybe:

if(b!= 0 && a * b / b != a) //overflow

Not sure about this "solution".

Edit: Added b != 0.

Before you downvote: a * b / b won't be optimized. This would be compiler bug. I do still not see a case where the overflow bug can be masked.

6
  • Also fails when overflow causes a perfect loop. Nov 1, 2009 at 18:17
  • Do you have an example of what you meant? Nov 1, 2009 at 18:29
  • Just wrote a little test: Using BigInteger is 6 times slower than using this division approach. So I assume additional checks for corner cases is worth it performance-wise.
    – mhaller
    Nov 1, 2009 at 18:36
  • Don't know much about java compilers, but an expression like a * b / b is likely to be optimized to just a in many other contexts. Nov 1, 2009 at 22:09
  • TokenMacGuy - it cannot be optimised like that if there is a danger of overflow. Nov 1, 2009 at 23:46
1

maybe this will help you:

/**
 * @throws ArithmeticException on integer overflow
 */
static long multiply(long a, long b) {
    double c = (double) a * b;
    long d = a * b;

    if ((long) c != d) {
        throw new ArithmeticException("int overflow");
    } else {
        return d;
    }
}
2
  • Wont help as one of the operands is long. Nov 1, 2009 at 23:50
  • 1
    Did you even test this? For any large but not overflowing values of a & b this will fail due to rounding errors in the double version of the multiply (try e.g. 123456789123L and 74709314L). If you don't understand machine arithmetic, guessing an answer to this kind of precise question is worse than not answering, as it will mislead people.
    – Rich
    Jan 21, 2014 at 11:13
1

I don't answer, but looking at the Java's code, it is simple. In JDK8, It converts into long operation, and downcast the result to int value, and compares with long result to see if value has changed. Below code explains better than me.

@HotSpotIntrinsicCandidate
public static int multiplyExact(int x, int y) {
    long r = (long)x * (long)y;
    if ((int)r != r) {
        throw new ArithmeticException("integer overflow");
    }
    return (int)r;
}
-1

c / c ++ (long * long):

const int64_ w = (int64_) a * (int64_) b;    
if ((long) (w >> sizeof(long) * 8) != (long) w >> (sizeof(long) * 8 - 1))
    // overflow

java (int * int, sorry I didn't find int64 in java):

const long w = (long) a * (long) b;    
int bits = 32; // int is 32bits in java    
if ( (int) (w >> bits) != (int) (w >> (bits - 1))) {
   // overflow
}

1.save the result in large type (int*int put the result to long, long*long put to int64)

2.cmp result >> bits and result >> (bits - 1)

0

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