6

I can successfully create a connection to a Postgres db using the following:

my $settings = {
    host => 'myhost',
    db => 'mydb',
    user => 'myuser',
    passwd => 'mypasswd'
};

my $connection = DBI->connect(
    'DBI:Pg:dbname=' . $settings->{'db'} . ';host=' . $settings->{'host'},
    $settings->{'user'},
    $settings->{'passwd'},
    {
        RaiseError => 1,
        ShowErrorStatement => 0,
        AutoCommit => 0
    }
) or die DBI->errstr;

But I'm left with valuable login credentials exposed (yes, I changed them) in my Perl module. Currently, I use psql to issue queries interactively. And to save on having to remember my username/password, I have placed the credentials in a file (~/.pgpass) with permissions 600. The file looks like this:

# host:port:database:user:passwd
myhost:5432:mydb:myuser:mypasswd

How can I safely use this file ("$ENV{HOME}/.pgpass") and the DBI module to hide my credentials? Can it be done? What is best practice?

0
11

YES! There IS a better way.

Change between test & live servers easily.

  • keep passwords in ~/.pgpass (for psql & pg_dump)
  • other config info in ~/.pg_service.conf (or /etc/pg_service.conf)

e.g:

#!/usr/bin/perl -T
use strict;
use warnings;
use DBI;

my $dbh = DBI->connect
(
    #"dbi:Pg:service=live",
    "dbi:Pg:service=test",
    undef,
    undef,
    {
        AutoCommit => 0,
        RaiseError => 1,
        PrintError => 0
    }
) or die DBI->errstr;

~/.pg_service.conf:

# http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.2/static/libpq-pgservice.html
# /usr/local/share/postgresql/pg_service.conf.sample
# http://search.cpan.org/dist/DBD-Pg/Pg.pm
#

[test]
dbname=hotapp_test
user=hotusr_test
# localhost, no TCP nonsense needed:
host=/tmp

[live]
dbname=hotapp_live
user=hotusr_live
host=pgsql-server.example.org

~/.pgpass:

# http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.2/static/libpq-pgpass.html
# hostname:port:database:username:password
localhost:5432:hotapp_test:hotusr_test:kq[O2Px7=g1
pgsql-server.example.org:5432:hotapp_live:hotusr_live:Unm£a7D(H
3
  • Or even connect with my $dbh = DBI->connect("dbi:Pg:", undef, undef); via the shell environment variable export PGSERVICE=test Nov 14 '13 at 14:33
  • Cool answer. I expected all along that there would be a better way to perform the connection without hard-coding a lot of the connection info into the perl. I have created a ~/.pg_service.conf file with the relevant fields, but I am receiving: ERROR: service file "/etc/sysconfig/pgsql/pg_service.conf" not found. Is there a way to force the connection to look at ~/.pg_service.conf instead?
    – Steve
    Nov 14 '13 at 23:54
  • Actually, I found the answer myself. All I need to do is set: $ENV{'PGSYSCONFDIR'}. Thanks!
    – Steve
    Nov 15 '13 at 0:09
2
  1. Put your login credentials in a file called ~/.pgpass as per the question above.

  2. To open a connection, you'll need to hard-code in the host, database and username. But that's ok, because at least you don't need to code in the password field. This field stays hidden in your ~/.pgpass file.

  3. Make sure to set the connection instance's password field to undef.

Here's what worked for me:

my $settings = {
    host => 'myhost',
    db => 'mydb',
    user => 'myuser'
};

my $connection = DBI->connect(
    'DBI:Pg:dbname=' . $settings->{'db'} . ';host=' . $settings->{'host'},
    $settings->{'user'},
    undef,
    {
        RaiseError => 1,
        ShowErrorStatement => 0,
        AutoCommit => 0
    }
) or die DBI->errstr;

The connections establishes successfully because for some reason, unknown to me at least, the instance searches the ~/.pgpass file when attempting the connection. I knew there was some magic with this file, I was just unsure about what to do with it. Doc link:

http://search.cpan.org/dist/DBI/DBI.pm#data_string_diff

Notice how a search for "pgpass" on that page does not return? And I refuse to read all of it. Well, one day maybe..

2
  • 1
    ~/.pgpass is a feature of libpq, the postgres C client library. DBI is built on top of libpq so it just inherits its features. This is why it works with DBI and why it's not mentioned in DBI doc. May 16 '13 at 15:31
  • 2
    It's PostgreSQL-specific, so it should not be mentioned in DBI's docs. On the other hand, it should be mentioned in DBD::Pg's, although it isn't. However, the latter does mention environment variables and a different config file format!
    – ikegami
    May 16 '13 at 20:02
1
open(my $fh, '<', "$ENV{HOME}/.pgpass") or die $!;

my $settings;
while (<>) {
   chomp;
   next if /^\s*(?:#.*)?\z/s;
   @{$settings}{qw( host port database user passwd )} = split /:/;
}

die "No settings" if !$settings;

Any user capable of running the script would still be able to see the creds.

6
  • Yeah, but surely there's a better way? I'm starting to think there isn't.
    – Steve
    May 16 '13 at 4:46
  • To simply pass the creds onto the $connection instance, without declaring them or opening up the file.
    – Steve
    May 16 '13 at 4:49
  • That makes no sense. Passing args to a function has nothing to do with the two things you mentioned. So again, I ask, better way to do what, exactly? And the follow up question is obviously going to be, better by what metric?
    – ikegami
    May 16 '13 at 4:54
  • I do apologize for the poor explanation. However, our last comments helped lead to the solution. If you're interested in the solution, please see my answer. Thank again for your help.
    – Steve
    May 16 '13 at 11:06
  • 1
    While this answer avoids hard-coding the password, sending it as a command line argument, or an environment variable, is an example of how to implement it if you are using a non-libpq PostgreSQL connection and is about as safe as using the .pgpass file from libpq, it re-invents the wheel since DBD::Pg is based on libpq. Just letting libpq deal with it's .pgpass seems like a better practice for DBD::Pg
    – jla
    Mar 13 '15 at 23:10

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