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I am writing a python script to keep a buggy program open and I need to figure out if the program is not respoding and close it on windows. I can't quite figure out how to do this.

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2 Answers 2

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On Windows you can do this:

import os
def isresponding(name):
    os.system('tasklist /FI "IMAGENAME eq %s" /FI "STATUS eq running" > tmp.txt' % name)
    tmp = open('tmp.txt', 'r')
    a = tmp.readlines()
    tmp.close()
    if a[-1].split()[0] == name:
        return True
    else:
        return False

It is more robust to use the PID though:

def isrespondingPID(PID):
    os.system('tasklist /FI "PID eq %d" /FI "STATUS eq running" > tmp.txt' % PID)
    tmp = open('tmp.txt', 'r')
    a = tmp.readlines()
    tmp.close()
    if int(a[-1].split()[1]) == PID:
        return True
    else:
        return False

From tasklist you can get more information than that. To get the "NOT RESPONDING" processes directly, just change "running" by "not responding" in the functions given. See more info here.

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  • Thanks, Quick question: How would I get the PID of the process I want if I'm putting it into a while loop (because I want it to run infintely and the PID might change because I'm going to close and reopen it) Commented May 19, 2013 at 20:17
  • @user2125510 If you are using subprocess to open the software (recommended) you can easily do like: p = subprocess.Popen('calc.exe') and access the PID with PID=p.pid Commented May 20, 2013 at 8:29
  • 1
    for my crashed and hanging application I get Traceback (most recent call last): File "<pyshell#9>", line 1, in <module> isrespondingPID(9064) File "<pyshell#8>", line 6, in isrespondingPID if int(a[-1].split()[1]) == PID: ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'Es' I then just wrapped it in try: ... except ValueError: ...
    – hardmooth
    Commented Mar 23, 2018 at 6:32
  • @hardmooth we could also just search the corresponding name or PID in the file content. Might be easier. I have taken this approach for my solution. Commented Feb 3, 2019 at 5:28
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Piling up on the awesome answer from @Saullo GP Castro, this is a version using subprocess.Popen instead of os.system to avoid creating a temporary file.

import subprocess

def isresponding(name):
    """Check if a program (based on its name) is responding"""
    cmd = 'tasklist /FI "IMAGENAME eq %s" /FI "STATUS eq running"' % name
    status = subprocess.Popen(cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE).stdout.read()
    return name in str(status)

The corresponding PID version is:

def isresponding_PID(pid):
    """Check if a program (based on its PID) is responding"""
    cmd = 'tasklist /FI "PID eq %d" /FI "STATUS eq running"' % pid
    status = subprocess.Popen(cmd, stdout=subprocess.PIPE).stdout.read()
    return str(pid) in str(status)

The usage of timeit showed that the usage of subprocess.Popen is twice as fast (mainly because we don't need to go through a file):

+-----------------------------+---------------------------+
|          Function           | Time in s (10 iterations) |
+-----------------------------+---------------------------+
|       isresponding_os       |           8.902           |
+-----------------------------+---------------------------+
|     isrespondingPID_os      |           8.318           |
+-----------------------------+---------------------------+
|   isresponding_subprocess   |           4.852           |
+-----------------------------+---------------------------+
| isresponding_PID_subprocess |           4.868           |
+-----------------------------+---------------------------+

Suprisingly, it is a bit slower for os.system implementation if we use PID but not much different if we use subprocess.Popen.

Hope it can help.

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