1

I am trying to make my Arduino blink "SOS" in Morse Code as my first real programming project ever.

I have succeeded in doing so, however now I would like to more efficiently write the code. Here is the my version. How can a while loop be implemented to get the S blinking twice? That seems to complicate keeping track of iterations with a counter.

int led = 13;
//yj Integer representing dit (morse ' . ')
int dit = 500;
//yj Integer representing dah (morse ' - '>)
//yj Testing a multiple of another constant integer to make the timing scalable.
int dah = dit*3;
int blankTime = 100;

// the setup routine runs once when you press reset:
void setup() {                
  // initialize the digital pin as an output.
  pinMode(led, OUTPUT);     
}

// the loop routine runs over and over again forever:
void loop() {
  digitalWrite(led, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(dit);               // wait
  digitalWrite(led, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(blankTime);               // wait  
  digitalWrite(led, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(dit);               // wait
  digitalWrite(led, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(blankTime);               // wait  
  digitalWrite(led, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(dit);               // wait
  digitalWrite(led, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(blankTime);               // wait

  digitalWrite(led, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(dah);               // wait
  digitalWrite(led, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(blankTime);               // wait
  digitalWrite(led, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(dah);               // wait
  digitalWrite(led, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(blankTime);               // wait
  digitalWrite(led, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(dah);               // wait
  digitalWrite(led, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(blankTime);               // wait

  digitalWrite(led, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(dit);               // wait
  digitalWrite(led, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(blankTime);               // wait
  digitalWrite(led, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(dit);               // wait
  digitalWrite(led, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(blankTime);               // wait
  digitalWrite(led, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
  delay(dit);               // wait
  digitalWrite(led, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
  delay(blankTime);               // wait
}

//TODO:
//Loop counter implementation for multiples (SOS = 3 dit, 3 dah, 3 dit.)
0

I would suggest for a simple function to generate morse code instead of writing interation again and again. It coulde something like this.

GenerateMorseCode(char MorseArray[], int len);

You can fill MorseArray with some identifier for dit and dah: May be you can use dot (.) and hipen(-). So for 3 dit , 3dah and 3 dit. Your array would be

...---...

with length of array as 9. Now inside GenerateMorseCode function all you need to do to parse the MorseArray. You can use simple switch case something like this

GenerateMorseCode(char MorseArray[], int len)
{
  for(int i =0i<len;i++)
{
switch(MorseArray[i])
{
  case '.':
  //Your led logic in case of dot
  break;
  case '-':
  //Your led logic in case of dah
  break;

}

}

}

Further more you can wrap this function inside another function which keep calling GenerateMorseCode function as per specified loops. To generate MorseArray you can create a map of char array with Morse code. You can keep adding new enum and update corresponding Morsemap. Something like this

#define MAX_ELEM 12
enum MorseCode
{
    A_M = 0,
    B_M, 
    C_M,
    SOS_M
};

typedef struct MorseMap
{
    char array[MAX_ELEM];
};

MorseMap mm[3] = {{'.','-','\0'},{'-','.','.','.','\0'},{'-','.','-','.','\0'} };

Also there is no need to length now, it can be calculated from char array. To access any Morse code use mm[A_M] or mm[SOS_M]

GenerateMorseCode(char arr[])
{
  int len = strlen(arry);
  //Above for loop and switch case case 
}
1
  • Thanks a lot, I'll take a look at this later as it seems complicated and I am on my mobile. May 16 '13 at 14:16
0

You want a method to represent "dashes" and a method to represent "dots". Here is an example using pin #13 on an Uno: http://www.devfactor.net/2014/09/22/arduino-made-easy-output-messages-in-morse-code/

/*
Morse SOS
*/

// the setup function runs once when you press reset or power the board
void setup() {
  // initialize digital pin 13 as an output.
  pinMode(13, OUTPUT);
}

// the loop function runs over and over again forever
void loop() {

  for (int a = 0; a < 3; a++) {
    dot();
  }
  for (int b = 0; b < 3; b++) {
    dash();
  }
  for (int c = 0; c < 3; c++) {
    dot();
  }
}

void dot()
{
  digitalWrite(13, HIGH);
  delay(250);
  digitalWrite(13, LOW);
  delay(250);  
}

void dash()
{
  digitalWrite(13, HIGH);
  delay(1000);
  digitalWrite(13, LOW);
  delay(250);
}

Note that the dash() and dot() methods make repeating much more elegant- and require less code than hard-coding each dash or dot.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.